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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
- because everything you know is wrong. Take nothing for granted. When you go for your regular dental visit, ask to see studies about the benefits of flossing; I personally would add that you should ask for studies documenting the benefits of fluoride, regular x-rays, regular cleanings, and other routines that one takes for granted.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/03/health/flossing-teeth-cavities.html?_r=0
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...ionid=6F00E2117DADD44210E6875E8D27AC47.f01t02

The same goes for routine childhood vaccines.

"SHOW ME THE SCIENCE!"
 

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You mean, we should question the 'experts'? That could come with horrible consequences, - like getting kicked out of the office...the 'do as i say or get out' attitude.

'What, you don't trust my word? Find another dr' (dentist, etc, etc)
In my experience, family practice doctors, optometrists and dentists are usually less rigid than pediatricians. Just about everyone is less rigid than pediatricians. The exception is a politician who is being called "anti-vaccine." Most start immediately talking about how devoted they are to vaccines.
 
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In my experience, family practice doctors, optometrists and dentists are usually less rigid than pediatricians. Just about everyone is less rigid than pediatricians. The exception is a politician who is being called "anti-vaccine." Most start immediately talking about how devoted they are to vaccines.
i had pediatricians only in mind when i responded...does make one wonder what a dentist would say to a patient when they're asking about flouride safety studies. Somehow I doubt it's a 'take my word, or get out of my office' type scene.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was lucky when my children were little, I rarely took them to a dentist.

One of my little ones needed dental attention, and I found a young dentist starting out. He listened to me and we got along fine. I used him for a long time and he has a thriving practice today.

I have an ongoing struggle with my own dentist about bi-annual xrays. I worry about the carcinogenic properties of those things. If I ever, God forever forbid, developed cancer in the area where the dental x-rays hit, I am sure it would be a coincidence. I had a run-in with a dental assistant who did my last xrays and had to repeat some of them. When I asked the next time I went in about the repeat xrays, the dental assistant had not noted them in my record.

I would think that an optomologist, optometrist, dentist or some other doctor would listen to their client. I have had problems with veterinarians, oddly.
 
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Here's a HuffPost piece on the same topic.

When flossing first gained acceptance, no proof was required of remedies. Dentist Levi Spear Parmly is credited with inventing floss in the early 19th century. By the time the first floss patent was issued, in 1874, the applicant noted that dentists were widely recommending its use. The ADA has been promoting floss universally since 1908.
This is why we need to question many common practices. The "we've been doing this forever" - "this is the way we've always done _______" answers are just not good enough nor are they scientific. But don't expect the Dental Industry to let go of it anytime soon:

National Institutes of Health dentist Tim Iafolla acknowledged that if the highest standards of science were applied in keeping with the flossing reviews of the past decade, "then it would be appropriate to drop the floss guidelines.''
Regardless, he added, Americans should still floss.
"It's low risk, low cost,'' he said. "We know there's a possibility that it works, so we feel comfortable telling people to go ahead and do it.''
My bold.

How much money is there in convincing people to keep flossing?

Even companies with a big market share of the flossing business — by next year, the global market is predicted to reach almost $2 billion, with half in the United States, according to publisher MarketSizeInfo.com — struggled to provide convincing evidence of their claims that floss reduces plaque or gingivitis.
my bold

I gave up flossing a few years back. I was concerned about the "wax" on the floss so I started using the "un-waxxed". Well that just got shredded by my teeth and I would have strands stuck between them. Frustrated, I bought a Waterpik and quit the floss. My gums have improved and when I go for cleanings, the scaling (which I absolutely hate) has been reduced to next to nothing.

Using non-fluoride toothpaste has also seemed to improved my dental health. We had to stop using fluoride because of our ds with autism who would swallow the toothpaste even though we were standing next to him guiding him to spit. We also quit getting fluoride treatments at the dentist. My children have never had a cavity.

I also put a halt to the x-rays. It seemed like they were being taken all the time at the dentist and the orthodontist when the kids were small. So I told them once a year and they could share the set between them. Now I tell them only take x-rays if there are complaints or you see something questionable during the exam. We have also said no to having the third molars (wisdom teeth) removed unless absolutely necessary. A study I read stated that only around 12% of the population absolutely needs them removed.

Luckily our dentist is really laid back. I would book two cleanings a year for the kids (insurance only covered one) to show that we were not neglecting their dental health. But I think the results (no cavities, no issues with the wisdom teeth coming in) should speak for themselves.
 

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Interesting about the flossing. I've been using dental picks between my teeth and only occasionally flossing and the results at the dentist seem to be about the same in terms of plaque.
 

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I switched to a naturopath almost a decade ago, and haven't looked back since. During that time I was still seeing a regular dentist... because that's just what you do, right? My dental clinic was at a very well known and respected university. The last time I went in the hygienist asked if I was pregnant or trying to conceive. I told her that we were trying to conceive and I was in that gray area between ovulation and starting my period so I didn't know if I was pregnant. She said, "Okay, well we will use a different x-ray vest (or whatever they're called) to protect your thyroid." I thought, "What?! Why don't you give everyone that vest to protect everyone's thyroid?!!". Lightbulb moment for me. I'm now with a fantastic holistic/biological dentist. Loves that I do high dose vitamin c to treat infections, loves that I use Earth Paste, doesn't care that I have my wisdom teeth, will not do root canals (go down that rabbit hole sometime), and he refuses to use nitrous in his office. I feel like every day I find something else that I've been lied to about. I'm thankful that I figured it out before my kids were born. I will always ask WHY and ask for proof before putting anything in their bodies.
 

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Here's a HuffPost piece on the same topic.



This is why we need to question many common practices. The "we've been doing this forever" - "this is the way we've always done _______" answers are just not good enough nor are they scientific. But don't expect the Dental Industry to let go of it anytime soon:

My bold.

How much money is there in convincing people to keep flossing?

my bold

I gave up flossing a few years back. I was concerned about the "wax" on the floss so I started using the "un-waxxed". Well that just got shredded by my teeth and I would have strands stuck between them. Frustrated, I bought a Waterpik and quit the floss. My gums have improved and when I go for cleanings, the scaling (which I absolutely hate) has been reduced to next to nothing.

Using non-fluoride toothpaste has also seemed to improved my dental health. We had to stop using fluoride because of our ds with autism who would swallow the toothpaste even though we were standing next to him guiding him to spit. We also quit getting fluoride treatments at the dentist. My children have never had a cavity.

I also put a halt to the x-rays. It seemed like they were being taken all the time at the dentist and the orthodontist when the kids were small. So I told them once a year and they could share the set between them. Now I tell them only take x-rays if there are complaints or you see something questionable during the exam. We have also said no to having the third molars (wisdom teeth) removed unless absolutely necessary. A study I read stated that only around 12% of the population absolutely needs them removed.

Luckily our dentist is really laid back. I would book two cleanings a year for the kids (insurance only covered one) to show that we were not neglecting their dental health. But I think the results (no cavities, no issues with the wisdom teeth coming in) should speak for themselves.
Think you could post a link about the 12% needing wisdom teeth out? My niece's mother has been pressured about having my niece's out & something like this could help her prevent the removal of them. Or pm it to me. ;-)

Thanks,
Sus
 
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@mama24-7 I think it is this one:

The Prophylactic Extraction of Third Molars: A Public Health Hazard

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1963310/
Wow! Great information. I love that they busted the myth about wisdom teeth shifting your other teeth. How does this inaccurate information even start? Who was the first person to say "Hmm... I think we should pull out everyone's third molar!" or more related to this forum, "We should start giving pregnant women the DTaP!"

(mumble "trust no one" and go back into my bunker) :wink:
 

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I'm now with a fantastic holistic/biological dentist. Loves that I do high dose vitamin c to treat infections, loves that I use Earth Paste, doesn't care that I have my wisdom teeth, will not do root canals (go down that rabbit hole sometime), and he refuses to use nitrous in his office. I feel like every day I find something else that I've been lied to about. I'm thankful that I figured it out before my kids were born. I will always ask WHY and ask for proof before putting anything in their bodies.
I recently posted some info regarding root canals:
http://www.mothering.com/forum/308-dental/1571961-root-canal-first-trimester.html#post19485177
 

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Wow! Great information. I love that they busted the myth about wisdom teeth shifting your other teeth. How does this inaccurate information even start? Who was the first person to say "Hmm... I think we should pull out everyone's third molar!" or more related to this forum, "We should start giving pregnant women the DTaP!"

(mumble "trust no one" and go back into my bunker) :wink:
Well, my wisdom teeth definitely shifted my teeth. Destroyed my bite.i take that one on a case by case basis. Before orthodontia, my lower jaw (and the kids like me, facially) is a little short, so there isn't room for another set of teeth there. In times when we would have lost a couple by 22, there would have been.

My elder daughter didn't get 12 year molars until after 16. When I asked the oral surgeon about wisdom teeth, he just laughed.
 

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My daughter's teeth also shifted and she had to have her wisdom teeth removed. Turned out she had an extra one besides.

I retained mine until my late 50s and then lost them to decay. They didn't push my teeth out of place, but I ended up with braces in my 40s because I had a tooth that came down very late. The baby tooth was still there when I was 39 or so and finally got it pulled. The tooth that came down late emerged behind my other teeth and was pushing one out of place.
 
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I cracked an amalgam filled molar eating oatmeal during my last trimester. Of course it was on a holiday weekend and had to wait a few days until a specialist could take it out. :eek: :crying:

So had I not been persuaded to remove the third molars as a teen, they would have been nice to have now.
 

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I think the moral of the story is all medicine should be treated on a case by case basis. In the information age, people are starting to expect more personalized care. Growing up I heard that I *had* to get my wisdom teeth out or I would develop bigger issues. I *had* to get my tetanus booster, even though I lived in the suburbs and had almost zero risk of getting it. I *had* to take antibiotics for (fill in the blank infection or sickness). I didn't know that there were other options out there, and they never volunteered that information.

I had a friend that used to say, "Say anything with confidence, and people will believe you."
 

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Ahhh...cynicism. Or is it self righteousness with an extra heavy side of entitlement masquerading as intellect and concern?.....OK, will you accept the validity of "Those studies" if they contradict some deeply held misbelief?
 

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Ahhh...cynicism. Or is it self righteousness with an extra heavy side of entitlement masquerading as intellect and concern?.....OK, will you accept the validity of "Those studies" if they contradict some deeply held misbelief?

Unless you self identify as non-vax, you are not permitted to post on this subforum. Check the forum guidelines.
 
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