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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">It is the story of Americans, in and out of the U.S. government, who moved mountains to help seven horribly maimed Iraqi men. It is not always pleasant reading, but there are rewards to staying with it, especially now.</td>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">As perfect justice, the story in fact begins in Abu Ghraib prison, in 1995. With Iraq's economy in a tailspin, Saddam arrested nine Iraqi businessmen to scapegoat them as dollar traders. They got a 30-minute "trial," and were sentenced, after a year's imprisonment, to have their right hands surgically cut off at Abu Ghraib prison.</td>
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<a href="http://www.opinionjournal.com/forms/printThis.html?id=110005081" target="_blank">The rest of the story</a>
 

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That's great SQ
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Last year, after we liberated Iraq, a veteran TV news producer named Don North--who has worked for major U.S. broadcasters--was in Baghdad with the U.S. to restore TV service. Iraqi contacts there brought him a tape of the men's amputations. Mr. North says dismemberment was common in Saddam's Iraq and that if one walks down a crowded Baghdad street one may see a half-dozen people missing an ear, eye, limb or tongue. He decided to seek out the men whose stubbed arms represented the civilized world's lowest act--the perversion of medicine.<br>
He found seven. Mr. North determined to make a documentary of their story and get medical help for them. How he found that help, if one may still use this phrase, is an all-American story.<br><br>
An oil engineer from Houston, named Roger Brown, overheard Mr. North's tale in a Baghdad café. He suggested Don North get in touch with a famed Houston TV newsman named Marvin Zindler. Mr. Zindler put him in touch with Dr. Joe Agris, a Houston reconstructive surgeon, who has worked in postwar Vietnam and Nicaragua repairing children.<br><br>
Mr. North sent Dr. Agris a copy of the videotape of the surgical atrocities, and Dr. Agris said: Send me the men; I will fix them.</td>
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Now, wouldn't it have been great if Bush could have got this same message through to his occupiers? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hammer.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hammer"><br><br>
then you wouldn't now be in the position of having to find stories about ordinary americans to try to make you feel better.
 

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someone posted a bunch of pictures of soldiers petting kittens and holding orphans on another site I go to. I get the point. Not all soldiers are bad. I never thought so to begin with. But where were the kitty picture posters BEFORE the prison scandal?<br><br>
On a sensitive note, I forwarded the kitty pictures to my vet dad, who really did appreciate them. He told me about feeding orphans in Nam, etc. My own grandfather found and cared for a Japanese child for a week while there during WWII, and continued to send him money for fifteen years afterward.<br><br>
All the happy touchy feely stories on earth, though, don't change what happened. And I get a little perplexed when people say, "They only show the BAD part of war on TV!"
 
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