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<p>Newly pregnant mom here...worrying about everything. :)</p>
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<p>Anyway, I am a school psychologist and test kids.  To lug my test kits around, I have them in a little rolling cart.  Today is was heavier than usual because I had picked up some extra files.  It was heavy getting in and out of the car.  I won't do that anymore.  I will empty is partially and then then fill it back up to lighten the load.  Any reassurance that I didn't hurt the baby/pregnancy for now?  Are there any lifting guidelines? </p>
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<p>Bree</p>
 

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<p>I've read 30 lbs.  But, what you lifted before pregnancy you should be able to lift now.  If you never lifted anything and were in really bad shape, I personally wouldn't start picking up 20lb boxes.  If regularly lifting 50lbs was part of your job, I'd be confident that my new found pregnant body would be capable to continue on as is.</p>
 

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<p>At my job during my pregnancy with DS I had to regularly lift up to 50 lbs.</p>
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<p>I was told that would be fine until 5-6 months when I had to lower the amount to 30.</p>
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<p>Lifting more would not hurt the baby, but could hurt me as the muscles used to lift it would be stretching out by that point</p>
 

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<p>Not sure what weight we're talking about, but I sometimes need to pick up my 40 lb dog and haven't suffered any ill effects yet.  I don't go out of my way to lift heavy things, but sometimes it's just unavoidable with taking out the trash or lugging groceries when DH is not there.  As long as you don't get any stomach pain, contractions or bleeding from it I think you should be fine.  If it hurts your back that's probably a good sign that it's too heavy so try and avoid it.  Eventually the belly will get in the way which I'm sure will make picking things up tricky anyway. <span><img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/smile.gif"></span></p>
 

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<p>I was use to schleping 50 lb grain bags and hay bales all over the place and wrestling with the alpacas at times and was told to lift no more than 30 lbs because I could tear my placenta.  So that is what I am going by.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<p>Thanks ladies.  I will be sure to have the cart a little lighter just to be sure, but it sounds like I didn't hurt anything.  It didn't hurt to pick it up or anything.  I used to help my 70 lb labrador in and out of the car.  We got her a ramp so I don't have to do that now.  The ramp is a little awkward, but not overly heavy.  I need to chill out.  I see my midwife on Monday for the first time so I'm hoping she can help me relax a bit.  I'll be 6 weeks tomorrow and this is my first (if you couldn't tell <span><img alt="smile.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/smile.gif">).</span></p>
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<p><span>Bree</span></p>
 

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<p>I'm 33 weeks and regularly pick up my 25 lb two year old.</p>
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<p>I also happen to work in foster care and have an almost two year old on my caseload that weighs around 32 lbs and when I have that kid with me, I often am picking him up.</p>
 

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<p>i don't know what the actual guidelines for weight lifting are however, if it's something you are used to doing (ie. not starting a new activity or lifting weights you are not used to), it should be fine.</p>
<p>i am a physiotherapist and when pregnant with dd1, i was working with folks with spinal cord injuries.  my day consisted of literally moving people, positioning them, helping to lift them, etc.  i worked until 10 days before my due date with no problems. </p>
<p>even now with my third, i sometimes have to carry both kids (~55lbs).  so far i've been alright.</p>
 

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<p>I think official guidelines for lifting are way on the cautious side.  Main damage, I think, would be to your own system which has to deal with loosening ligaments, not to the baby / pregnancy.  Important is that you lift in the correct way and that you don't lift more than feels right (and it's only later on, with 20+ weeks, that this will change from what it was pre-pregnancy and that you'll feel the limitations of your pregnancy on activities such as lifting).</p>
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<p>It's important to try to be relaxed about all these things: it's my first pregnancy as well and in the first few weeks I freaked out over EVERYTHING (won't give examples, they may be infectious).  I learnt to focus on actively doing the right things (eating well, getting sufficient sleep and exercise) rather than trying to avoid doing 'bad' things.  Knowing I was doing the right things helped me get the right mindset.  Very important, because being overly stressed is in itself harmful!</p>
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<p>Enjoy your pregnancy!</p>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>gumshoegirl007</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1284573/another-paranoid-question#post_16105394"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I've read 30 lbs.  But, what you lifted before pregnancy you should be able to lift now.  If you never lifted anything and were in really bad shape, I personally wouldn't start picking up 20lb boxes.  If regularly lifting 50lbs was part of your job, I'd be confident that my new found pregnant body would be capable to continue on as is.</p>
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<p>FYI, I'm a professional fitness instructor & certified as a personal trainer. I worked out like a fiend my whole PG with DS & had a fantastically healthy pregnancy & quick, relatively easy birth. If you really want to know the science, definitely check out the book, "Exercising through your pregnancy" by Dr. Clapp. Very interesting read!</p>
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<p>Yup, pretty much, I agree with the above.</p>
<p>HOWEVER - it is crucial to note that the reason you should not <span style="text-decoration:underline;"><em>start</em></span> exerting yourself more than previously is just because <em><span style="text-decoration:underline;">you could injure yourself</span></em>! <span style="text-decoration:underline;"><strong>It's not a risk to the developing fetus.</strong></span> It's just that you could strain some back muscles, etc. (Since those muscles <em>aren't used to</em> the exertion.) So don't worry that if you do chose to exert yourself, there could be some unknown, unseen detrimental effect for the baby. Not at all! <strong>Exercising in your pregnancy is as good for you <em>and baby</em> as exercising is for every other human on the planet</strong>.. i.e. VERY good! :)</p>
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<p>As my DH wisely & succinctly put it, "<span style="text-decoration:underline;">When is exercising <em>NOT</em> beneficial to your health?</span>" & he is sooo right! Don't fear exercise.</p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Buddhamom</strong> <a href="another-paranoid-question#post_16105476"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="../../../img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div class="quote-block">told to lift no more than 30 lbs because I could tear my placenta.</div>
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<p>Hm, never heard that one. I've heard no more than 25# and I think that may be an ACOG guideline, but "tear your placenta" - that seems really odd to me. What muscles do they think you'd be lifting with?</p>
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<p>Incidentally, I don't agree with ACOG's 25# guideline anyway. (& it's certainly not the only issue I disagree with ACOG on!) How many of us are regularly picking up toddler's heavier than that? My DS is about 35# & I pick him up often.</p>
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<p>I'm 27W now and just Monday I did dumb bell chest presses with a 25# dumbbell in each hand. I regularly do barbell rows with about 65# total. & with my DS I kept all this up the whole time. I only stopped going to the gym to lift at 40W and only then because I was going to lose my mind if someone else said, "No baby yet?" ha!</p>
<p><br>
The "stretching" thing does have some truth to it - the hormone relaxin kicks in in the 3rd tri that makes all your joints a bit lax. It's purpose is to help your hips separate for birth, but it has a negative side effect of leaving you with the potential to accidentally over-stretch. Just be very careful when stretching & don't stretch farther than you used to - don't necessarily push stretches to the point of "mild discomfort" as we usually say.</p>
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<p>But, again, on the whole, you are really better off doing SOME physical exertion than none. A "sedentary lifestyle" is not a good thing - so try to be active somehow.</p>
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<p>If you think about human history, life involved a LOT of physical exertion up until recently. If physical exertion were incompatible with reproduction, there certainly wouldn't be as many humans on the planet! It's not that heavy lifting is at all detrimental to gestation - again, it's just that for those who aren't used to physical exertion -which is most Americans- it could lead to muscle/back strains. But if you often exert yourself, you shouldn't feel any need to place any sort of specific restrictions on your activity. LISTEN TO YOUR BODY, of course & if continuing to pump iron feels good, pump on! :D</p>
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<p>My MWs - both the hospital-based CNMs I saw for DS' birth and the HB MW (CPM) I'm seeing now all have no problem with my activity level. I think it's very unusual for them to encounter, but they always say, "Oh, yeah, well you did that before you got PG and you did that with your pregnancy with your DS, so yeah, no problem, don't worry about it."</p>
 

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<p>Well, for me, since it took 8 years to concieve this baby (we weren't even trying) after being told we could never get preg. again after failed IF treatments then one adoption and the fact I am 40 years, there is no fourth chance at pregnancy. So  I think I personally will stick to my MW advice and keep to graining, haying and watering alpacas and leave the schleping to my sister, her wife and DH.  I certainly get plenty of exercise. So I guess maybe the answers actually lay with each individual MW/OB of the particular person as we all have different lifestyles and needs.</p>
 

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<p>I have heard 45#, I have always been wearing, carrying, or picking up a toddler in my pregnancies because they are all so close together.  I wouldn't worry too much about it, really.  Take an easy and make sure you are lifting things properly-- of course.  Lighten the load if you can, for your own comfort, once your belly gets bigger your back will appreciate it.  But I don't think you have done anything that would cause damage at this point.</p>
 

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<p>My OB said not to lift anything I wouldn't feel OK to lift when I wasn't pregnant, but that if I was used to picking up a 40 pound feed sack before pregnancy, it was fine during pregnancy.</p>
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<p>He said an exception was in women who have had many children, very heavy lifting <strong>late</strong> in pregnancy can sometimes force the cervix open early (or something like that).</p>
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<p>But he said I could feel free to use pregnancy as an excuse to get out of picking up heavy stuff all I want!</p>
 
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