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As I'm entering my third tri, I've been thinking about life with a babe and realizing how very little I know about the everyday workings of a wee one. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> So here are my current newbie questions (I'm sure I'll think of more...):<br><br>
1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people? My dad said something about not wanting to be around my new nephew too much in his first few days because the "baby hadn't built up his immunity yet" and I wondered if that was old wives' tale thinking or had validity.<br><br>
2) How do you know if your baby is too hot or too cold?<br><br>
3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not?<br><br>
4) Do receiving blankets need to be washed before use, like clothes and dipes do? My birth center asks us to bring 8 receiving blankets (I have no idea why!), and I'd rather keep most of them in the packages in case we don't end up using them.<br><br>
5) At what age does a baby start getting a little water to drink?<br><br>
Thanks for responses!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>NYCVeg</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people? My dad said something about not wanting to be around my new nephew too much in his first few days because the "baby hadn't built up his immunity yet" and I wondered if that was old wives' tale thinking or had validity.</div>
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Immediately. Our ped in the hosp just said to keep him away from "obviously drippy" people, lol. We took him to the store his first day home because he came 5 weeks early and we needed supplies!<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">2) How do you know if your baby is too hot or too cold?</td>
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I've gone by the way DS's skin feels.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not?</td>
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Doesn't matter.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">4) Do receiving blankets need to be washed before use, like clothes and dipes do? My birth center asks us to bring 8 receiving blankets (I have no idea why!), and I'd rather keep most of them in the packages in case we don't end up using them.</td>
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I'd wash them. And yes, you may not believe it, but you will use them.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">5) At what age does a baby start getting a little water to drink?</td>
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DS is 9 mos now and hasn't yet. Ped said we could start giving him some so he could practice drinking from a cup. Just haven't yet.<br><br><br><br>
Best wishes to you! motherhood is the BEST!
 

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1. When my babies were born I liked to keep them away from others for the first 2 weeks if not a little longer. That was just my personal preference I would suggest you go by the way you feel trust your instincts.<br><br>
2. When a babe is too hot they will sweat too cold they shiver.<br><br>
3. If you are using cloth I would recommend changing them first so when they drift back off after eating you don't need to wake them to change.<br><br>
4. Wash them and yes you will use them for a variety of things.<br><br>
5. BF babies don't need water. It's mostly used for entertainment between the ages of 9mo and one year.<br><br>
Congrats on the new babe
 

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1. You can take them out right away. My ped said to make people wash their hands before touching the babe though, so I wouldn't let strangers touch him at all.<br><br>
2. I feel the back of his neck.<br><br>
3. In the early days I changed at every night feeding because he was pretty much pooping and peeing constantly. I changed before the nursing session so he could nurse to sleep and I wouldn't have to wake him up. Now that my baby's 6 weeks, he doesn't poop anymore at night so I don't change his dipe at all until morning (we use Fuzzi Bunz so his tush stays feeling dry though). We nurse in bed and everyone gets better sleep this way.<br><br>
4. Wash everything. You really can't have too many recieving blankets. You can always cut them up and use them as burp cloths or wipes if you don't end up needing so many.<br><br>
5. Nothing but breastmilk for at least 6 months. After that, I'm not sure when water is supposed to be introduced.
 

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Just a heads up, some babies have colder hands a feet. That is ok as long as the rest of them feels warm.<br>
LOL I freaked out because my DD's hands were so chilly, so i would wrap her up in more things, she was SO warm because of that, too warm!!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>NYCVeg</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people? My dad said something about not wanting to be around my new nephew too much in his first few days because the "baby hadn't built up his immunity yet" and I wondered if that was old wives' tale thinking or had validity.</div>
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We took DS to the local grocery (for maybe 10 minutes) at 2 days old, and his first "real" excursion at 8 days. I wore him in the sling and didn't let strangers touch him. As far as the immunity, that's probably true for FF from birth babies. But colostrum is pumped full of antibodies from mom to protect the baby from all the new germs he'll come into contact with the minute he emerges. And of course BM keeps replenishing antibodies for any new germs he comes into contact with.<br><br>
Oh and as far as cold/hot, the general advice I've read is: When it's warm, dress baby similar to you, and when it's cold, dress similarly plus one extra layer (sweater or blanket).
 

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1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people? My dad said something about not wanting to be around my new nephew too much in his first few days because the "baby hadn't built up his immunity yet" and I wondered if that was old wives' tale thinking or had validity.<br><br>
If you are breastfeeding and baby is getting immunities from you they will probably be immune to anything already in the house...or people you see or have seen often...for example if you were exposed to your nephew's most recent virus and built an immunity to it baby will likely have it too. All of us had a virus before, during and after babies birth...it went through the house...baby didn't get a sniffle. If someone isn't obviously sick then I think it's ok.<br><br>
2) How do you know if your baby is too hot or too cold? One layer more than I need is what the midwife said...I agree. so if I am wearing pants and a shirt baby wears pants and a shirt and a light blanket. hands and feet may be colder. booties and mittens for that.<br><br>
3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not? I always did because often baby fell back to sleep while nursing. Also I didn't always change a diaper...I use cloth so I would check...sometimes she would be dry.<br><br>
4) Do receiving blankets need to be washed before use, like clothes and dipes do? My birth center asks us to bring 8 receiving blankets (I have no idea why!), and I'd rather keep most of them in the packages in case we don't end up using them. I wash them...I like them freshly washed.<br><br>
5) At what age does a baby start getting a little water to drink? after a year..I don't know...with bfing I never gave water until they were big and tried ours.<br><br>
Good Luck! You must be so excited.
 

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1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people? My dad said something about not wanting to be around my new nephew too much in his first few days because the "baby hadn't built up his immunity yet" and I wondered if that was old wives' tale thinking or had validity. <b>Don't know if that's an old wives tail or not. Maybe they do have to get enough breast milk to receive your immunities. That said, I brought DD out at like 4 days old - but safely lying in her sling where people couldn't touch her. And believe me - people like to get *very* close if they can to a newborn. I loved that she was hidden!</b><br><br>
2) How do you know if your baby is too hot or too cold? <b>Sweaty if hot, hands and feet adn ears will get chilly first. Usually one thin layer more than you are ok in is good.</b><br><br>
3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not? <b>personal opinion, but i always changed first. that way she was awake more to latch on and drifted off to sleep with nursing. If you use cloth, you can tell more easily if baby is wet - well, if you have on pants or nightgown and can stick a finger in the diaper.</b><br><br>
4) Do receiving blankets need to be washed before use, like clothes and dipes do? My birth center asks us to bring 8 receiving blankets (I have no idea why!), and I'd rather keep most of them in the packages in case we don't end up using them. <b>I wash everything! And yes, you will probably use that many. They get peed on, pood on, burped up on etc</b><br><br>
5) At what age does a baby start getting a little water to drink?<b>not until at least 6 months and even then if you are still BF a lot it's not necessary. My dd is 7 and 1/2 months and if she sees me with water wants a sip - so she has just that - a sip of mine. Babies can drink out of cups if you hold it to them carefully. DD was cup fed at birth due to latch on issues.</b><br><br>
Thanks for responses![/QUOTE]<br><br><br>
Good luck!!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not?</td>
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I nursed one side, had dh change the diaper<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> , then nursed the other side. When I only nursed after changing, baby would go to sleep before really getting full and be awake sooner. Try different ways and see what works for you and your baby.
 

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I don't know if what I do is the "right" thing, but here's what I do:<br><br>
1. I don't take her out much, cause our carseat is too big. (Got a convertible, and am just realizing that she isn't going to grow into it anytime soon, and have to get an infant seat.) But I'm not worried about germs, she's breastfed, so she's getting my immunity.<br><br>
2. I go by how I feel, combined with her hands. If I'm chilly, and her hands are cold, I'll give her an extra layer. Or a hat. She's usually ON me, and therefore, I assume she's ok.<br><br>
3. I don't change at all in the middle of the night, unless she's poopy. She hardly wakes to nurse, and changing her would wake her all the way up. Sometimes we do an early morning change.<br><br>
4. I'd wash them.<br><br>
5. I wouldn't give water til we started solids.
 

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1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people? My dad said something about not wanting to be around my new nephew too much in his first few days because the "baby hadn't built up his immunity yet" and I wondered if that was old wives' tale thinking or had validity.<br><br>
I started going out just 4 days after giving birth. It was winter, so just to the store or relatives' houses. By 2 weeks, I was cruising the mall with DS in a sling. I never worried about germs. If someone was obviously sick, I didn't let them hold him, but otherwise, it didn't concern me. That's what the immunites in breastmilk are for! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> Or so I tell myself... A sling definitely made people keep their hands to themselves.<br><br>
2) How do you know if your baby is too hot or too cold?<br><br>
I just always dressed DS the way I was dressed. If I'm wearing long-sleeves, so is he. I always put socks and a hat on him as a newborn, though, even if I wasn't wearing them.<br><br>
3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not?<br><br>
I always waited until after, because DS always pooped while he was nursing. Plus, he didn't like to wait for his meal. Newborns usually poop a lot, so they don't really get a chance to get soaked before they need changed. If you use disposables, you will have a hard time telling if the baby is wet. If the diaper feels mushy, it's definitely time to change. Cloth is much easier to tell!<br><br>
4) Do receiving blankets need to be washed before use, like clothes and dipes do? My birth center asks us to bring 8 receiving blankets (I have no idea why!), and I'd rather keep most of them in the packages in case we don't end up using them.<br><br>
Yes. And trust me, you will use them! Even if you don't use them at the BC, you will use them later. As spit-up rags, back-up diapers, a cape when your baby is a toddler and wants to play superman!<br><br>
5) At what age does a baby start getting a little water to drink?<br><br>
Not sure when it's ok. DS started reaching for my water at about 7 1/2 months and I figured it was ok then (in small amounts from my cup, you don't want to give a baby 8 oz in a bottle, it can fill them up and make them skip a meal.
 

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1. We started taking DD out around 2 weeks but not too often, and not to places with a lot of people. At 6 weeks now I am comfortable taking her out for longish walks or to the mall but I don't let people touch her or get near her except when we are at home and I know them and I know they are not sick. Having a sling is great for hiding the little one!<br><br>
2. As PP said, I check the back of her neck. If sweating, she is too hot. I find that she's hardly ever too cold (unlike me) - must have her dad's genes. I also find that her grandmamas are always trying to dress her in a million layers and she gets just boiling hot - I think a lot of it depends on the temperature of your house and we keep ours pretty warm. Outside, I usually only put a hat on if we are going for a walk. For quick trips to the car and then into another bldg I don't bother with a hat because her car seat cover is fleece and the head snugger thing keeps her pretty warm.<br><br>
3. For the first 4 weeks I changed her diaper before feeding her at night so she would be a bit more awake for eating because otherwise we had a lot of latching problems. Since then I've stopped changing her unless she's pooped (which usually doesn't happen as she's on the once a day in the afternoon poop schedule now) or unless I've done a bad diapering job and she's leaked all over her clothes and the bed.<br><br>
4. I would wash them. I thought that I had enough blankets for an orphanage (what with the 5 I bought and the 25 I got either as gifts or as lonaners) but it turns out that I only have a few that I don't use on a regular basis. I also leave blankets in most of the rooms throughout the house so I don't have to go searching for one if I need it.<br><br>
5. As most have mentioned, babies don't need water for a long time - since we're early on, I haven't worried about it and likely won't for months.<br><br>
Best wishes with the birth and babymoon!
 

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NYCVeg said:
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1- I'd go with your own instinct on this one. If I had a newborn, I'd stay inside for a week or two. Maybe I'd venture out for a walk, weather permitting, but I'd stay away from mass groups of people with the new baby (mall/grocery store...)<br><br>
2- Contrary to a PP, our doctor told us to dress a baby one layer LESS than what we wear. I had always heard the add a layer train of thought. I think the best bet is to check the tenp of the chest/belly area. As another poster said, hands and feet are not a good measure of a babies temperature. Also, you'll get a sense of what level of covering makes your baby most comfortable. G for example gets hot (and grunpy!) easily.<br><br>
3- chances are, you'll be able to tell if she is wet. I have heard that bf babies tend to poop after eating so you might want to wait so you only have to change once!<br><br>
4- wash them and count on using them at some point.<br><br>
5- I'd wait till begining solids to add water. We did give G small quantities of water here and there to help with constipation concerns.<br><br><br>
Happy third trimester <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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Thanks for all the replies! I feel so well-informed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> Babe is expected in late May/early June and we live in DC where the summers are HOT and humid and sticky (swamp hot). I know newborns are supposed to be chilly little critters, but would she even need a hat and socks if we were outside? If it's one more layer than I would wear...well, I'd go naked if I could! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I think the only places I'll want to take her when she's very wee--i.e., the first few weeks--are to the usually-deserted park across the street from my apartment to get some fresh air (though I use the term loosely--there's really no such thing as "fresh" air in the summer in DC!) and with me when I walk the dog.
 

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1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people?<br><br><span style="color:#000080;">You can take them out immediately. But personally, since it's cold and flu season, I would not let strangers touch my newborn. (And strangers <i><span style="text-decoration:underline;">will</span></i> touch your newborn...on the face, even...and after they have gone to the bathroom, wiped their own runny noses, handled money, etc....) In fact, since mine was a Dec. baby, I kept the top to the baby carrier up and often draped a blanket over the baby so that strangers would realize I was creating a physical barrier. We also took her to Barnes & Noble in a sling a lot. (My dh wore the sling! LOL!) Nobody could see her, but if she moved, people thought we had brought a dog in! LOL! And believe me-- once we stopped covering her up so much, I couldn't believe the number of people who stated to touch her!!! But now that's she's 14 months, I notice people at stores respect her space more. They don't seem to stop touching until the baby can sit up in the cart by his or her self.</span><br><br>
2) How do you know if your baby is too hot or too cold?<br><br><span style="color:#000080;"><b>Great Question!</b> Look for a <b>"harlequin" pattern</b>, forming on the skin. If you don't know what an old fashioned European harlequin clown or pattern looks like, google it or look here: <a href="http://www.kiddiekots.com/nap%20mats/images/harlequin.jpg" target="_blank">http://www.kiddiekots.com/nap%20mats.../harlequin.jpg</a><br>
and then you will recognize the pattern (not the colors!) on the baby's skin when you see it. Of course, your babies little blood vessels won't make a perfect, triangular pattern, okay? It will be a close approximation.</span><br><br>
3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not?<br><br><span style="color:#0000FF;">I'd say yes, so you don't have to wake him if he falls asleep while BFding. And he most likely will fall asleep while BFding.</span><br><br>
Thanks for responses!<br><br><span style="color:#0000FF;">No problem! Good luck and enjoy. You'll get through this like all the rest of us did. I didn't have anyone around to help, but there was always the internet! LOL! And speaking of the internet-- the NICU nurses at my hospital taught me how to bathe my baby. When I wanted to learn how to swaddle her better, I consulted the <b>Johnson and Johnson website</b>. They have quite a few <b>streaming internet instructional videos</b> on how to do all sorts of things with a newborn. <span style="color:#FF0000;">Best swaddling instructions I'd ever seen</span>. And all done by NICU nurses from my hospital!</span>
 

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You're probably going to need to go out and get some stuff after the baby is born... as long as you are bf you shouldnt have to worry too much about this. I would recomend staying at home as much as possible because you are going to worry everytime somebody you are around gets sick. At least until they get a little bigger... Maybe 6 weeks.<br><br>
I dress dd in one layer more than what I wear. If she's fussing a lot I let her play in her onesie. She will fuss if she is too cold/too hot. I keep a hat on her at all times because I've heard babies can get ear infections real easily if they dont have a hat. Maybe it's just me over reacting.<br><br>
At first I changed her diaper after her feeding because she would poop while I was feeding her... At about 3 weeks I started changing her before the feeding. Like everyone else said, it helps her wake up for a better latch and I can bf her to sleep.<br><br>
Definately wash them... You will use them! I use them mostly for burp rags or to catch whatever spill comes out of her. I keep one under her when she's on my bed... She likes to pee and spit up and I'm not good enough at catching the pee in the diaper when I'm changing her.<br><br>
I just heard last night that a couple swallows of warm water can sooth a gassy/fussy baby's belly. I'm going to try this tonight... Not sure if she will take water or if it will work though. Otherwise, they dont need it until they start solids.
 

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1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people? My dad said something about not wanting to be around my new nephew too much in his first few days because the "baby hadn't built up his immunity yet" and I wondered if that was old wives' tale thinking or had validity.<br><br>
As soon as you want to. May/June where you are is warm you said so I'd feel fine (and did myself) take babe out for a walk at a day or two old - why not? We took our dd1 to a HUGE annual arts and crafts fair (tens of thousands of people) when she was six days old. I LOVE that fair and didn't want to miss it that year (we go every year) plus I wanted some pink clothes for her and the fair is around the mall area.<br><br>
I wouldn't take my baby around people that are obviously sick but summer isn't notorious for that, and I think nursing will provide the immunity so I wouldn't really worry much.<br><br>
2) How do you know if your baby is too hot or too cold?<br><br>
If he/she is fussy but dry and fed, maybe too hot or too cold. I agree with everyone that said what you wear plus an extra layer. My dds were all born in the summer. When we'd go out for walks for example, I'd put her in a summer outfit but cover her with one of those very lightweight receiving blankets. In the fall, put a onesie under her fall clothes. Sometimes I'm hot but not sweating, or cold but not shivering so I'd just try covering or uncovering a bit if baby is fussy and you don't know why.<br><br>
3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not?<br><br>
Dh always changed the diaper before I nursed at night. Many babies fall asleep nursing in a dark room (or any place really - light or dark) so I wanted a dry baby to start with so we didn't have to change her after and risk waking her up. I like sleep!<br><br>
4) Do receiving blankets need to be washed before use, like clothes and dipes do? My birth center asks us to bring 8 receiving blankets (I have no idea why!), and I'd rather keep most of them in the packages in case we don't end up using them.<br><br>
Yes, wash them. If you don't know why the bc wants you to bring eight, ask them. We used maybe two or three so eight seems a little excessive but I'm sure they must have a reason. But even if you don't use eight there, you will need eight for your own use at home so go ahead and buy them and wash them. I personally ADORED Gymboree's blankets! Really good size and weight and stayed wrapped when you swaddled (my babies liked that when they were little)<br><br>
5) At what age does a baby start getting a little water to drink?<br><br>
Not until you are practicing sippy cup use - between eight and ten months old? My kids had nothing but breastmilk the first six months.
 

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I think it makes sense to keep a newborn on the down-low so to speak for a week or so. I'm not super concerned about germs, but just the general stimulation of the crazy world this side of the womb! My dd was born at 32 weeks so she didn't have the luxury of a gentle transition into the world--she was born into a world of harsh lighting, beeping alarms, and nurses bustling about at all hours--and she's FINE. But I do think it would have been an easier transition for her (and me!) if she and I could have snuggled down and laid low together for at least a few days or a week. I'd say go with what feels right to you, and always have people wash their hands in the beginning! I echo others' suggestions about the sling keeping people's hands away. And don't feel preassured into passing the baby around. Babies are not toys, and I was amazed at my mother-bear instincts to keep her close to be in the beginning. Anyway, just my $.02!
 

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<b>1) When can you start taking your baby out with you (to the park, for walks, etc.). Are there problems with baby interacting with other people? My dad said something about not wanting to be around my new nephew too much in his first few days because the "baby hadn't built up his immunity yet" and I wondered if that was old wives' tale thinking or had validity.</b><br><br>
I would say as soon as you feel up to it, and if the baby is healthy. Don't feel obligated to be superMom or rush back into your routine, though...just roll with it! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><b>2) How do you know if your baby is too hot or too cold?</b><br><br>
You'll know, you're the mama! Babies sometimes have cold hands and feet and that doesn't mean they're freezing. Get some little sleep and plays with feet and you should be fine.<br><br><b>3) When your baby wakes up in the middle of the night to bf, should you change his/her diaper first? What if you can't tell is he/she is wet or not?</b><br><br>
They pee something like 30 times a day in the early weeks, so chances are baby will be wet. But my daughter pooped after every nursing session in the early days, so you'll just have the follow the cues of your little one's tum.<br><br><b>4) Do receiving blankets need to be washed before use, like clothes and dipes do? My birth center asks us to bring 8 receiving blankets (I have no idea why!), and I'd rather keep most of them in the packages in case we don't end up using them.</b><br><br>
I have a lot of receiving blankets, and they are good burp clothes, etc, but I will probably just cut up a jersey cotton sheet to make my own swaddling blankets when I have another kid. Commercially made receiving blankets are awfully small. Do you have any mom friends who'd pass some onto you so you don't have to open the pack unless you like them?<br><br><b>5) At what age does a baby start getting a little water to drink?</b><br><br>
They don't really need any until they're getting serious about solids, IMO. But my daughter was reaching for our food and drink (and everything else, so it wasn't a sign of eating readiness), so we started letting her have a sip of water here and there starting at about 3 months, and always after nursing. It wasn't enough to affect her in any way, and she enjoyed how cool it was. She probably got about three drops down her throat.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>NYCVeg</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks for all the replies! I feel so well-informed. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> Babe is expected in late May/early June and we live in DC where the summers are HOT and humid and sticky (swamp hot). I know newborns are supposed to be chilly little critters, but would she even need a hat and socks if we were outside? If it's one more layer than I would wear...well, I'd go naked if I could! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I think the only places I'll want to take her when she's very wee--i.e., the first few weeks--are to the usually-deserted park across the street from my apartment to get some fresh air (though I use the term loosely--there's really no such thing as "fresh" air in the summer in DC!) and with me when I walk the dog.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bouncy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bouncy"> was born in August in DC and she only wore onesies for the first month and a half b/c anything else was too hot (she was boprn August 12th and as you well know the scummy nasty hot humid temps last until October) <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bouncy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bouncy"> never wore socks until sometime in October or if the a/c making her a bit chilly (didn't happen often) and she never wore hats until the winter
 
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