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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I believe that's what the US said- someone mentioned that could be why I am not feeling a lot of movement, even though on the US I could see it. Anyone have any info? I tried to google it but came up with less than helpful information
TIA
 

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Just means that it's on the front wall of your uterus instead of someplace else in the uterus. It's a common reason why mamas don't feel movement until later. The placenta is cushioning the movements, kinda like a pillow. If someone punches you through a pillow, it's alot different feeling than if they punched you directly, right?

ETA: From here: http://www.ivillage.co.uk/pregnancya...173833,00.html

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Think of your uterus as a large hollow pear made of muscle. The pear is upside down (stalk down) in your pelvis. The side nearest your spine is called the posterior wall, the side next to your tummy muscles is called the anterior wall and the top of the uterus (or the bottom of the pear) is called the fundus.
In most pregnancies, the placenta is implanted on the back wall (posterior). In your case, it is situated on the front wall (anterior). This is unusual, but not unheard of. It is certainly nothing to worry about.

When you go for your next antenatal check up, I would make sure you have a chat with your midwife or doctor. You can then ask them to explain the exact position of your placenta, and whether this might have any effect on your labour and delivery.
I disagree that it's unusual, I've heard of lots of mamas having this.

ETAx2: From here: http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/placprev.html

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Often, an anterior placenta takes up some room in the front of the mom's belly that would otherwise be occupied by the baby's back. This can sometimes cause the baby to be somewhat posterior, although this tends to correct itself as the baby moves lower into the pelvis and the back moves down, beyond the placental location.

Sometimes, in an effort to correct this apparent posterior position, moms will spend a lot of time on hands and knees. This can be a problem with an anterior placenta in that then the baby's weight is right on top of the placenta, which can cause some cord compression, especially with big babies or low fluid levels. This can result in minor fetal distress or meconium.

So moms with anterior placentas who are doing hands and knees might want to limit the time to 2 or 3 minutes at a stretch.

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Can anyone help provide information about the implications of an anterior placenta? I've searched my medical texts and the Web and found nothing other than the implications regarding placement of the needle for amniocentesis.

Are there any implications for fetal growth or labor and delivery?

I can imagine that an anterior placenta might predispose a baby to a posterior presentation, and possibly even to a breech presentation.

If the blood vessels are less dense in the anterior uterus, perhaps there could be implications for mild IUGR. But then one might expect reduced risk of postpartum hemorrhage.

I'm labor coaching for a client whose OB mentioned it with one of those "Well, this bumps you up into a higher level of risk" tone of voice, and she was worried.

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No problems, other than sometimes posterior,( baby curls around placenta), or harder to hear FHTs because of loud souffle.

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I'm kind of wondering why you're worried about it...I figure that lots of women have anterior placentas. There has been a suggestion that they may somewhat predispose to posterior presentations, but the only thing that I find is that women (particularly multigravid) may feel less fetal movement with them. I figure that this is because there is more "insulation" between the fetus and the outside world, as it were. In one instance not too long ago, I was sure the placenta was anterior, but the mother was worried about fetal movement. Sent her for U/S and guess what? I was right. Only thing I noticed was that the baby consistently laid on the opposite side of the uterus to the placenta. Everything else was completely normal.

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Wouldn't the only risk be during the ( waaaay outside) chance that she would need a c-sec? Because if the placenta is anterior making the incision would be dicey-they would have to deliver the placenta and the babe at the same time, and blood loss could be a concern.

I had a low lying anterior placenta with my 2nd pregnancy, and the only challenge was hearing my son! Sometimes it took a good 10-15 mins. to get clear heart tones. Maybe this is what the doc is concerned about? It would seem that using a doptone would make that easier (my mw used a fetoscope). Other than that everything.

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I don't know of anything significant with anterior placenta placement. It just may make the FHR harder to pick up depending on the baby / placental positions. The only other problem would be that if a cesarean section was needed the OR team would have to be careful (and would hopefully be able to determine placental placement prior to the incision).

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Can be harder to palpate, to get clear FHT; mom may perceive less movement.

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There is some evidence that women with anterior placentas feel quickening later and also experience less fetal movement. I don't know how much research has been done on it but it does make some logical sense.

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I've definitely found this to be true in my practice. Moms need lots of reassurance about late perception of fetal movement. I tell them that the placenta acts as a pillow between the moving baby and their abdominal muscles, which sense the baby's movement. The baby is still active, but the movement is "muffled" by the placenta.

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The main thing is that if the mother has ever had a C-section or anything that could scar the anterior endometrial area then she is at higher risk for placenta accreta.

ETAx3: From here: http://forums.obgyn.net/pregnancy-bi...9901/0203.html

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Anterior placentas are extremely common and generally do not cause complications. The exception is if you have had a prior c/section. Then, in some cases, the anterior placenta can attach itself to the old scar in the uterine muscle, a situation called placenta accreta (or percreta or increta, depending if the placenta goes deeper into the muscle, or even through the entire uterus, respectively). This can cause hemorrhage with delivery, necessitating blood transfusion or even hysterectomy. Fortunately, if you have never had a c/section, this is quite rare.

Anterior placentas should only rarely cause problems finding the baby's heart beat. At 16 weeks this would not be an issue, unless you are fairly overweight. (Not a little overweight, but considerably overweight). The more likely cause of not hearing the baby's heartbeat at 16 weeks is that the darn kids move all over the place at that age, and it can sometimes be hard to track the heart rate! I would be surprised if they had a hard time your next visit, which in normal circumstances would be at 20-22 weeks or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
*The main thing is that if the mother has ever had a C-section or anything that could scar the anterior endometrial area then she is at higher risk for placenta accreta.*

So I had a c/s with #2, VBAC with #3. Sould I be concerned? From the brief research I just did, an US can determine placenta accreta, so do I just ask for an additional US at 36/38 weeks to see? Would I want to do it sooner? For the love of Pete, #4 is not supposed to throw you curve balls
 

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When I was planning my vbac with dd I had a 20 week us and the placenta was right smack on the front. But by 30 or so weeks it was at the top of my uterus. I dont think an U/S is necesary. You can hear placenta with doppler or fetoscope to see if its high enough.
 

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I have an anterior placenta but I could feel movement around it, at 20 weeks its slowly creeping to the left so I feel more movement on the right. Generally the placenta will rise with the uterus regardless of anterior or posterior placement.
There is supposedly an increased risk of posterior (sunny side up) babies with anterior placentas ..but i guess I dont really buy that...

I asked the dr about c/s complications with an anterior placenta and in the case of an emergency c/s ( true life or death) if they have to go through the placenta they will and do damage control for blood loss for all concerned.

in the case of a non emergency c/s (ie not life or death at that exact instant per se )they do the traditional lower uterine incision which will avoid all but the lowest lying placenta.

for me personally IUGR hasnt been a problem...theyre actually talking macrosomia with this baby (macrosomia=big baby)

this is my second anterior placenta baby...my oppinion? as long as it isnt placenta previa...dont sweat it. anterior is more of an incidental comment then a worrisome finding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My concern is more about the placenta implating too deeply due to the previous CS, not a repeat CS. My CS was due to yss being frank breech, and my VBAC was fine, so I am not worried about a repeat CS per se.
 

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I think this baby's placenta is in front, but slightly to the right as things are growing. When I *do* feel movement, its only on the left side. I was thinking of asking my mw to see if she can hear it where I think it is at my next appt.
 

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I have an anterior placenta this time, and did last time as well. Other pregnancies I have no idea. I did feel movement later last time, and haven't really felt anything definitive yet. Oh, and my last baby was not posterior.
 
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