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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I've been told that antibodies are used in some or all? vaccines instead of dead viruses. Until then I've never heard of it. Which vaccines contain antibodies, and which contain dead viruses?
 

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The tetanus vaccine -THIG-tetanus human immune globulin is from antibodies from other peoples blood systems.<br><br>
There used to be one for diptheria from horses???<br>
That is all I can think of -<br>
except -anti venom for snake bites-I think they use horses for that one ????
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
sorry I wasn't making myself clear. Well, I already have the answer as I checked my vaccination book out and it happen to be there.<br>
Just to clear things up though, I wondered which vaccines use a virus, dead or live and weakened, and which vaccines use antibodies. I was lead to thin kthat some use antibodies due to someone's post on another board. The answer I guess is simple. Antibodies are used in the tetanus toxoid as someone already mentioned, but also in other short-term shots, for measles and other diseases. Yes, I've heard some are derived from horses, which of course give bad reactions.<br>
So, when antibodies are used, it is in the shots that are given when someone is suspected to contract a disease, as when stepping on a rusty nail, or during an epidemic. And they give protection only for a very short time.
 

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Just so nobody's confused, tetanus toxoid & TIG are 2 different things. And immune globulin/antibodies for the intended diseases aren't actually in the measles etc vaxes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
no, i didn't say that antibodies were used in the measles vaccine. Just that measlesantibodies are used to prevent sickness during an epidemic, much like the TT is used to prevent tet when there's a puncture wound. I got the info from Romm's book. So, 2 different shots.
 

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Hi!<br><br>
I thought I might be able to shed a little light on this subject:<br><br>
Most (if not all) routine vaccinations wouldn't contain human or animal antibodies. These type shots are given only in emergency circumstances such as : suspected or actual exposure to rabies or tetanus, snake bite etc.<br><br>
The reason for this is basically that our bodies won't tolerate another person's antibodies. They are treated as invaders and attacked by the immune system. They can function for a time until they are broken down by our immune systems. (This is why a rabies shot requires multiple injections). This is also why these sorts of shots have so many side effects. When our body mounts an immune response, it generally makes us sick.<br><br>
In order for us to acquire an 'immunity' to something, our body's must be triggered to react and to produce our own antibodies in order to let our immune system develop a 'memory' against a disease, virus, etc, rather than an antibody.<br><br>
Hope this helps!<br><br><br>
Emily<br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">
 
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Whoops! You're right Insider, I've misspoke. I said 'antibody' when I should have been saying 'serum protein' or 'antiserum'. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/jaw.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="dropjaw"> . Also, instead of 'person's' I should have said 'species'. In the case of these 'emergency shots', human serum isn't often used. It's usually horse or some other large animal with lots of blood no? In which case, the recipient can mount a strong response to the isotypic determinants of the foreign antibody.<br><br>
As far as vaccines, are there actually any 'anti-idiotype' ones currently in use out there?
 
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