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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think based on what I know about dds issues with anxiety (even though they are improving), and what I think is a reactive hypoglycemia issue, wouldn't it make more sense to do a half day K rather than full day?<br><br>
I wrote a letter to her s/n preschool teacher who originally asked if I was going to put K in full day. I said I didn't really know.<br><br>
This is one of the reasons why (from the letter I wrote):<br><br>
"I know K still has issues with fatigue and hunger. Yesterday, after only being gone for 2 hours at the playgroup while I was in the STEP parent class, she was crabby from the minute we hit the car. She said, “I’m very hungry and we didn’t even get a snack when we were there” and proceeded to pout and whine. I should have brought a snack to give her in the car, but forgot to (big mistake). She was melting down for about a half hour even though I tried to give her a snack when we got home (she didn’t want to eat anything).<br><br>
We picked up M (K was still fussy in the car), ate lunch out and came home. She slept for about 2 hours (she often needs naps after incidents like these). I know what caused it – I know she normally does better when she has a good protein rich breakfast (like eggs), and she didn’t yesterday. K and E both had the same breakfast (cereal). They both went to the playgroup while I went to the parenting class. Only K was the one to have problems aftewards. Through observation over many incidents such as these, I know that what K eats really determines how resilient she can be over the course of the day."<br><br>
"Aside from making the scheduling easier for the speech teacher and less intrusion onto the academic portion of her day, what benefits do you see in a full day program for K? We go to the park enough, we have a wooden playset in the backyard, and she has ballet class and does Yoga for Kids videos and uses the trampoline at home. We have a huge supply of art materials, and she gets time on the computer at home".<br><br>
[the afternoon portion of the day is about art, gym and computer time]<br><br>
From a purely financial standpoint this is another reason why I want to half day K.<br><br>
"Additionally, we will have to pay about $1000 for E to go to preschool, and then we would have to spend $1200 for the afternoon portion of full day K. I’m not sure that would be money well spent if K has adjustment problems with the longer hours. Since I don’t work, that extra $100 a month will be felt financially".<br><br>
***<br><br>
ETA - full day is a lottery based thing and there's no guarantee she will get in. I just don't think it's worth the trouble.<br><br>
Does this sound like multiple good reasons to keep her in 1/2 day. I can't think of a single benefit to dd2 to have her in all day.
 

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I think half day would be the better fit for her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's what I was thinking, but the s/n teacher originally thought full day would be okay. Except...there's no guarantee she'll get full day anyway - it's lottery based.<br><br>
And...at the kindergarten registration meeting last night, one of the K teachers specifically said, some kids just aren't ready for full day K. Granted, my dd2 will be almost 6 when she goes, but clearly, she still melts down when she's taxed (even if it's fun) and doesn't have a good breakfast and frequent snacks.
 

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A good kindergarten will have frequent snacks, and you can always plan with the teachers for your daughter to have a small stash of non-perishable snacks (or small ones if they have a fridge like cheese slices or sticks) so that if there's no snack for some reason, for a while, she can have one to keep up her energy.
 

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I don't quite why the hypoglycemia would control her schedule - that should be accommodated within her day, and the hours of her day should, IMO, be set by her educational needs, your family scheduling needs, finances, and developmental stuff. For now, the teachers and administrators can help with this, and as she grows it's something she'll need to manage for herself without forcing her to skip the life activities that she'd be able to do if it weren't for special needs.<br><br>
My kindergartner for instance, gets medication and food twice during the school day, plus he has access to his own snacks in his backpack which he can freely access at aftercare if the group snack wasn't enough.<br>
A similar issue is the diabetic kids in our district - they get their shots at school at the time they need them, they don't leave school to get them or have half school days because that's all the time they can last between shots. They get the same educational time as the non-diabetic kids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cchrissyy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13270840"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't quite why the hypoglycemia would control her schedule - that should be accommodated within her day, and the hours of her day should, IMO, be set by her educational needs, your family scheduling needs, finances, and developmental stuff. For now, the teachers and administrators can help with this, and as she grows it's something she'll need to manage for herself without forcing her to skip the life activities that she'd be able to do if it weren't for special needs.<br><br>
My kindergartner for instance, gets medication and food twice during the school day, plus he has access to his own snacks in his backpack which he can freely access at aftercare if the group snack wasn't enough.<br>
A similar issue is the diabetic kids in our district - they get their shots at school at the time they need them, they don't leave school to get them or have half school days because that's all the time they can last between shots. They get the same educational time as the non-diabetic kids.</div>
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I understand that, if she has medical proof though. She does not at the moment. She was testing using a fasting glucose test, but came up within normal ranges. I haven't ruled out reactive hypoglycemia right now, but I'm afraid to subject her to a 5 hour glucose tolerance test (a 5 hour would be better than a 3 hour, because reactive hypoglycemics react within the 3-5 hour range).<br><br>
So, no medical proof, no accommodations will be made, I'm almost certain of it. I told them about her issues at home from the beginning and that I figured it was hypoglycemia. In fact, teacher kept asking me why I was bringing our own snacks from home (which were often carrots, grapes and a whole grain cracker) when all the kids except those with <b><i>documented</i></b> medical allergies had the group snack (which is often crap like oreos, and sun chips and teddy grahams and jello). The reason for the group snack so that the s/n kids could learn table manners - sharing/passing the food/saying thank you. For a while, we did bring on our own, but then dd felt excluded and it was more of a problem because she was left out (and would melt down because she was left out), so I let her have the group snack. Because I picked her up by 10:40 and could give her a healthy snack at home, I figure it wasn't worth the fight about the school snack.<br><br>
However, I do know for a fact that the kindergarten doesn't have snack breaks. Perhaps they make accommodations for those who have a medical doctor's note, but we are not likely going to get one.<br><br>
So...there's not much I can do.<br><br>
I did send in the letter to the teacher, with our concerns. She hopefully will have something useful to say, but at the moment, I'm not convinced full day is going to be better for her. I'm not sure if I'm going to get her tested with the GTT if I don't have to until she's absolutely forced to go all day (that would be with first grade of course).<br><br>
I don't think they personally care if she melts down at home. All they care about is the time she's in school. However, we've gone through about 2 years of intense meltdowns at home, and we've only started really not having daily issues. I'm not in a hurry to return to constant meltdowns again.<br><br>
All that aside, she will also miss out on the things we do at home, and I personally don't think the gym, the art, and the computers is something that would be all that important if we can do those things at home. At home, we focus on math and art and occasionally science projects and nature study.<br><br>
She would also probably have to give up her ballet class and I really don't want her to not have that. She really enjoys it and it helps center her and gives her confidence. I think that's more important right now than gym class. If I really wanted to, I could sign her up for the Young Rembrandts courses, which are more open-ended, rather than the cut/paste/stupid drawings that dd1 brings home from her art classes during school hours.<br><br>
Oh, yeah...<br><br>
and I'm adding, it's not even guaranteed that she'll get into full day. She still goes into a lottery like everyone else. I'm just trying to figure out if it's even worth bothering doing the extra work to do that (extra forms, ensuring her name is on the list, going to the lottery day, etc).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I still haven't heard one reason that indicates full day would be beneficial, other than for convenience sake for her speech teacher. Any input on that?
 

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What are the different hours of the classes? My ds is having a hard enough time making it from 8-2 in first grade and he is the same age you dd will be next year.
 

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I would think the primary benefit of the full day would be the more social aspect of the acdtivities part of the day. Gym, music, etc. - they work differently and require different skills to navigate. She'll miss those opportunities if she's at home. If she's going to go to full day 1st grade, that background could be useful. I know you already do these things at home, but it's not the same as doing them in a group/classroom setting. Perhaps it's not enough of a benefit overall to make it necessary, but consider that if she's the only classmate doing half day, will that be something she realizes and recognizes? Would you have the option of starting full day and then dropping down to half day if she didn't handle it well?<br><br>
As for the snack thing - if it's affecting her education b/c she can't focus and concentrate w/out a snack, you may not necessarily need a dr. note.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Her hours would be 8:10-2:40.<br><br>
The s/n teacher seemed originally that it might be beneficial for her to have full day. Now I know why. The teacher ended up calling me at the end of the day to talk about the letter I sent in today. She had explained more fully what her original reasoning to suggest that (and this suggestion was a few weeks ago).<br><br>
What she told me was that often, kids come home from 1/2 day K and turn on the tv and don't do anything with their parents. In essence, some parents use the TV/video games to babysit their kids rather than do activities with them and school would be a much better option than to be babysat by the TV.<br><br>
I think, after she gave her the Bracken test that showed dd was actually at least 1.5 years ahead academically than her age, and after discussing that I do a lot of things at home with her and her sisters, dd2 could handle either full day K or 1/2, but the choice was ours. I wasn't sure before, though before it sounded like she was encouraging full day K. But now I see why she said that. It would be better off for a child to have full day if all they would do is sit in front of the TV instead.<br><br>
She did say that if we were to do full day K, it could be written into her IEP to have snack breaks built in to her day. So, I was relieved to hear that. I was slightly worried that she didn't take that concern of mine seriously or that I'd need medical proof that she needs the snack break. We just had our case conference Wednesday, and this happened on Thursday. Had I known she still would have problems like the above, I would have had it written in on that day to begin with. But at least the possibility exists to modify it if we do full day K.<br><br>
My gut instinct has always been 1/2 day K. I just didn't know if there was something more I wasn't seeing. In fact, I'm thrilled, because I can do what I did for dd1, and that was to afterschool her with projects at home, some of which were direct extensions of the class lessons, others were science projects, all of it was pretty fun stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bdavis337</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13273479"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would think the primary benefit of the full day would be the more social aspect of the acdtivities part of the day. Gym, music, etc. - they work differently and require different skills to navigate. She'll miss those opportunities if she's at home. If she's going to go to full day 1st grade, that background could be useful. I know you already do these things at home, but it's not the same as doing them in a group/classroom setting. Perhaps it's not enough of a benefit overall to make it necessary, but consider that if she's the only classmate doing half day, will that be something she realizes and recognizes? Would you have the option of starting full day and then dropping down to half day if she didn't handle it well?<br><br>
As for the snack thing - if it's affecting her education b/c she can't focus and concentrate w/out a snack, you may not necessarily need a dr. note.</div>
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Thanks for helping me think this thing through.<br><br>
She won't be the only class member doing half the day. She'll be in a class of all half day students. They only have 2 full day and 4 half day classes. It's lottery based, so we still have might be looking at 1/2 day K if she doesn't get picked for full day K.<br><br>
About the selective mutism, the thing is that gradual exposure to different things is best. I'd rather that she feel success at doing the academics first, and give her another year to add the rest. While I do think it's important to navigate those other arenas, I want her to take it slow. She could get exposure to the other areas when she's another year older and farther along in her maturity.<br><br>
Music will be hard if there is singing or hand motions involved. Even at her special needs preschool, she talks now but really sings only after encouragement from SLP.<br><br>
To me, doing full day then going to half day wouldn't be better, because that would involve a class change, and a new set of students. I'm sure she'd have a problem losing friends because of it. Also, it might make her feel that she's a failure.<br><br>
As it is now, she goes to special needs preschool 2 mornings a week, and 2 afternoons a week. And she goes to regular preschool 3 mornings a week. She gets exposure to three different sets of kids, two different teachers, and two sets of goals as it is. But she does have decompression time between morning and afternoon class at home (makes a huge difference because I give her a substantial lunch, and let her watch a show or play the computer to unwind a bit). By Thursday afternoon, she's usually very wiped out. So, for simple exposure to other kids/classroom settings, I think she's okay on that front. But I see what you mean about using different social skills for the gym and the music class.<br><br>
She does do group things too. The ballet is a group setting, and she does summer sports programs too. I could enroll her in a sports program after school, or even in Young Rembrandts for exposure to other kids and skill sets if that is the case.
 

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I think the fact that she is wiped out by thursday would make me want to go with 1/5 day. The anxiety is a big thing also. We are finally getting to where we think we could add in an activity and not have it be too much for him. I do get what the teacher is saying and agree with her that enrichment is much better than tv watching. I guess it comes down to whether you want that extra amount of time spent at school or with her family.
 
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