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That is what my degree is in. The teaching market here is pretty bad. I don't expect to be able to get a job locally for a few years now, until we get hit with a lot of retiring teachers.<br><br>
I hated substitute teaching. I am OCD and just showing up and having to figure out how to run a room was horrible for me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> I thrive in my own room with my own schedule, knowing where my own things are, etc.<br><br>
I teach Pre-K right now. I love it! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy"> However, I made more money in my part time job I put myself through college with and I had much better benefits there, too <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
So I am thinking of applying for teaching jobs out of state. I am getting divorced, I have no kids, so I don't have any strong ties here. My Mom says she will follow me wherever I go anyhow <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
But something about this scares me. I mean, when you got your first teaching job, did you just walk in to an empty class room? And I see threads on MDC about how the teachers have to pay out of pocket for crayons, etc. That is probably my only hang up right now. Going in to an empty room and having to fill it. How would I fill it?<br><br>
I know, this is probably the dumbest thing to get anxious about. But I was wondering if that is how it really is- or do you at least get some supplies in a room when you start working?<br><br>
Any feedback is appreciated <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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Not all schools make teacher's pay out of you own pocket. Although, I'm in Canada and so it might be different. In my experiences, teachers get a classroom budget to spend throughout the year. Not much, mind you, but enough to spruce up a classroom.<br><br>
With that said, I know a lot of teachers who buy things for their classroom and save them for the moment they get a teaching position. That way, if you don't get a permanent contract, you can take everything and use it in your next classroom.<br><br>
It's always nerve-wracking/scary walking into an empty classroom for the first time. But you're not alone- there are other teacher's who will give you advice and help you get started.<br><br>
I say- go for it! You have nothing to lose! Good luck!!
 

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This was my experience, I am sure it varies.<br><br>
I moved from Oregon to Oakland, CA to teach right after graduating grad school. We (me and DS) moved the first week of August and school was set to begin the 3rd week of August. Technically, I only had about 4 days to set up my room. You might find it is a constant work in the progress that first year or two. I was told by the other veteran teachers... just prep for the first month or two.<br><br>
I definitely did not enter into a big empty classroom, and I cannot imagine that ever being the case... but, wonders never cease. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
Our school buys a lot of stuff, including furniture/rugs, for each grade level and that stuff stays in the classroom. Plus, the former teacher of that grade level left a lot of stuff for me too. So, I was pretty well set up. I did spend about $500 of my own money, but I easily could have just made do with what was left.<br><br>
Our school does provide all supplies to students, as the majority of our students are below poverty level. We have a 98% population of free/reduced lunch. But, I have worked in other schools where the students are required to bring their own supplies and the teachers collect them as 'community/class supplies.'
 

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I teach middle level, but figured I would chime in here. If the teaching market is poor where you are at, and you have no ties, move! Just make sure the district you are moving to is in a good place in terms of growth and funding so that you don't end up moving for a position that is cut at the end of the year.<br><br>
As for the big empty classroom...well, yes, it can be that way. Particullarly if you move to a brand new school, or take over from a teacher who moved to another school and took all their stuff with them. However, I've always found that vertern teachers are always willing to help a newby out with posters/supplies/decor and whatnot. And retiring teachers are usually happy to see their beloved classroom items find a new home with a new teacher. Some schools do give you a small stipend (think $50 - $100) to buy supplies, but some schools simply can't afford that. However, I've always found it works well to ask for donations from the communtiy. You can ask your students to bring in one item off a long list of school supplies, and offer them a prize if they bring in two or more (think small, like stickers, or the right to write/draw on the board for a week). I've also posted on Craig's List and found people willing to donate to a classroom -- everything from fish tanks to school supplies. You just have to not be too shy to ask for help, and be willing to take what is offered even if it might not have been your first choice. Many people in the community are looking for a way to support schools, and you can usually find someone to help you. There are also sometimes grants available through the union, PTSO, or a local organization that provide funds for new teachers. Keep your eyes and ears open!<br><br>
Good luck in your job quest. I know this is a hard time to be out of work and searching.
 

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I'm a preschool teacher too, but I work in public charter elementary school. This was my first year teaching at this school, and the classroom came well stocked. The former teacher did take a lot of things with her when she left (things she had purchased), but I had more than what I needed to make the year a success. I did choose to buy a few things out of pocket this year, but they were things that made the class more fun, not things that were absolutely essential.<br><br>
My school is in the midst of some very large budget problems, but I can't imagine the school NOT supplying the basic needs of the classroom. That said, the teachers I know do spend time and money acquiring supplies, but these are things that are nice/helpful, not things that are necessary. I think teaching is a lot like anything else- you can spend a whole bunch of money to buy things to make life easier, or you can do it cheaply.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your input. I wanted to add that I am fine to pay for things for my hypothetical room- but right now money is so tight from the medical bills and my super low paying job, so I was worried to just show up and have an empty room before getting some actual paychecks to get me started <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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My mom used to teach 5th grade and she kept a lot of her stuff. In the distant future, PM me if you do get a job and want teacher stuff; if she still has it I'll have her send it to you.
 

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It really depends on how you get the job. If you are getting a job because of an excess of kids, say, and they have to set up another room due to numbers, you might just get the basics. If a teacher is retiring, you will probably get more.<br><br>
Each teacher in our district is given $ to order things. There is separate money for the basics like pencils and paper and then the "bling" like fancy stuff from catalogs. However, in our district this is done at the end of the school year for the next year. If they know a teacher is retiring, a principal, and even that teacher might order the basics, but keep money aside for the next person to order some new things.<br><br>
It really just depends on the situation. I don't HAVE to buy stuff out of pocket, but sometimes if you don't it can be difficult to have the classroom you want.<br><br>
We're all in a budget crunch, so we are down to bare bones right now. I only have enough pencils for each kid in my class to have 1 until June 16, so yeah, I'll be spending some of my own money...
 

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I am an elementary special ed teacher, and I have access to some good materials, but I do buy a lot. Before I was married and I only made 24 K, I did not buy anything for the almost bare classroom I was given. My husband makes decent money, so now I do buy things for the classroom that I couldn't have gotten otherwise.
 
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