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Hi - I haven't posted in this forum for awhile...with 4 kids we stay busy! My ds (now 3.5 years) has had lots of delays (including speech, which we are just now finally beginning therapy for, even though I've been asking since he was 18 months old <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/banghead.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="banghead"> ), and I've posted in the 'not quite special needs' thread on and off.<br><br>
However, this post is in reference to my 19 month old dd3. I don't know why I've been slow on the uptake with her (especially with ds's speech delay), but I have.<br><br>
I'm fairly certain she is going to be speech delayed as well. She babbles a lot and makes lots of noise - but mainly vowel sounds. The only consonant she says consistently is 'm' (Mommy is her favourite word!). But she doesn't even say 'Daddy' and I can't get her to make a 'd' sound (she'll copy the mouth movements for a 'd' but no sound comes out!).<br><br>
Her hearing was evaluated at 10 months and was fine.<br><br>
I'm in the UK and I know for a fact the kind of run around I will get with such a young child, and I'm pretty certain I'll get no 'official' speech therapy until she is 2.5-3 years old (although since ds is in speech therapy now, I'm hoping I can piggy back her along).<br><br>
BUT - I don't want to wait to do anything. So - does anyone have any ideas of things to do to stimulate sound production in a 19 month old? I would very much appreciate any ideas for things I can do at home with her...this waiting for professionals on the NHS is for the birds. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
I would say that she communicates well in her own way (lots of grunts and pointing) and her receptive language appears to be fine (I can tell her to pick up the animal book and take it to Daddy, and she'll do that).<br><br>
But I know her speech development isn't 'typical'. I guess I just assumed that I wouldn't end up needing speech therapy with 2 of my kids (silly me)...
 

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Have you looked at talktools.net? We've found some good oral stimulation toys for our ds with low muscle tone; may be different than what you're aiming for, but take a look there if you haven't yet. Good aids for just getting the mouth awake and alive. HTH!
 

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I'm trying to remember what our ST did with DS when he was younger. He didn't start until after he turned two so I'm not sure how well these things will translate for a 19 month old. . . .<br><br>
Blowing bubbles, blowing cotton balls around (off the table, around the table etc) with a straw, any sort of noise maker that you have to blow to use. Sucking drinks, especially thick things like milkshakes or yogurt through a straw.<br><br>
I chose about 10 words that he was trying to say, but wasn't articulating very well and we made a book with pictures of those things (cracker, book, rock wall, etc) and then we "read' the book a lot.<br><br>
She picked certain words that it would be very handy for him to actually use and practiced with him on those specific words. (For example he had a habit of jumping off of things into my arms without warning. She taught him to say "Ready" and wait for "yes" before he jumped.)<br><br>
That's all I can think of right now.
 

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lots of silly & very repetitive sound play. blowing bubbles is great for "pop, pop, pop" Knocking blocks down & saying "uh oh" over & over. delaying your responses until she verbalizes (not super -AP but very therapy).<br><br>
DEFINITELY look into using sign language. It's very helpful & is a great bridge from non-speaking to speaking stages. for us, it was a lifesaver to fall back on when dd developed a moderate hearing loss at 2.5 & before she got tubes to resolve it.<br><br>
hmmmm, looking through books & photo albums & using very simple language for each page.<br><br>
that's all i can think of for now!
 

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not 5 minutes ago a caseworker offered to mail me speech excercizes to do from birth to 18 months. If you wantr a copy, I could mail or email it when I get it.
 

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We did a lot of work with animal sounds, brushing with a nuk brush (tongue), sign language, funny tongue movements (touch your nose in a mirror, wag it like a dog, lick peanut butter off top of lip, that kind of thing). Sign language (Signing Time dvds rock). I dunno if you do media, but we also used the Baby Babble dvd.
 

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Lots of great suggsetions already! Also do a lot of mirror play--have a mirror at DD's level, and make goofy faces with each other, see if she can touch her tongue to various parts outside her mouth, put on lip gloss, find goofy glasses to wear, anything to raise her awareness of her mouth, tongue and face.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm in the UK and I know for a fact the kind of run around I will get with such a young child, and I'm pretty certain I'll get no 'official' speech therapy until she is 2.5-3 years old (although since ds is in speech therapy now, I'm hoping I can piggy back her along).</div>
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I'm in the UK too and you *can* get speech therapy before the age of 2 if you really push for it. It was a huge fight for me, but it paid off in the end. The biggest problem was finding someone who took my concerns seriously because ds has speech issues but is advanced with language so a lot of people just shrugged it off as too many words too soon and something he'd grow out of. I knew he wouldn't just grow out of it (and he hasn't) so as soon as I found someone who would listen I just pushed and pushed for a referral.<br><br>
Would you be able to pay for a private assessment even if not for private treatment? That would be another way around it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks so much everyone! Some of this stuff we're doing, but there are a lot of great new ideas - thank you very much! Chrissy - if you have any exercises you could e-mail/PM to me, that would be very much appreciated.<br><br>
Kay - we did consider paying privately for an evaluation for ds...and I might do that for dd, although I'm hoping to at least have ds's current speech therapist have a quick 10-15 session with her at some point to get a feel from her where she thinks dd is at.<br><br>
It's funny - I've been doing the funny tongue movements with ds, as he has low muscle tone - and he has a difficult time copying me (he's 3.5 years old). DD3 has no problem at all - she can move her tongue any way I move mine.<br><br>
But she just isn't making the range of sounds you would expect from a 19 month old...worries me (sigh).<br><br>
Thanks again everyone...
 

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We just finished S-T with our twin daughters with a program from the Hanen Centre (based here in Canada). We started when they were 18 months old and had, oh, maybe 4 words each. Here is a link to their webpage and some activities.<br><br><a href="http://www.hanen.org/Hanen2002/pages/Parents/TipsAndActivities/TipsAndActivities.htm" target="_blank">http://www.hanen.org/Hanen2002/pages...Activities.htm</a><br><br>
The program we used was "Target Word" for those with expressive delays, and it seemed pretty good. The emphasis was on SLOWING down, giving the child a chance to talk/respond, repeating key words (we had 10 words we really worked on, pictures of them all over the house), making "fun" sounds (zoom! pop!) etc. You might be able to order one of their books?<br><br>
Good luck with your little one.
 
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