Mothering Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,<br>
I have a 2.5yo ds who has been getting bored lately and I have been thinking about implementing some of the Montessori materials/techniques. We already work on practical life, but to be honest probably not enough. I would like to get the knobbed cylinders and some other materials but it is very overwhelming. The materials are expensive, which ones are the best to get for this age? Is there a certain order for presenting them, for example do you do the pink tower first or do you do the knobbed cylinders or some other type of materials?<br><br>
Regarding the sandpaper letters, is it still pretty standard to use the cursive ones? Or is italic or script a better choice today? What about sandpaper numbers, is this a good age to present them?<br><br>
Is there a Montessori curriculum out there that I could purchase and follow? I am feeling a little overwhelmed (can you tell?) and I honestly don't know where to start and once I start where to go from there. DS just seems bored lately and I believe he needs a little more challenge in his day. He already knows how to count, his shapes, his colors, how to recognize a few numbers, he can put together small puzzles like <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FMelissa-Doug-Deluxe-Jigsaw-Puzzles%2Fdp%2FB000REQHFG%2Fref%3Dpd_sim_t_title%2F102-7803474-9249739" target="_blank">these</a> and he is bored very quickly. He also loves animals and knows so many different ones.<br><br>
I guess I am just pretty frustrated that he is getting bored so easily and I'd like to offer him more throughout the day. Montessori is very appealing to our family and I have done a lot of reading but I just don't know where to start. Please help me..<br><br><br>
*Sorry for the rambling!<br><br>
SJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,244 Posts
A great book to start with is Teach Me To Do It Myself! It's a collection of M. activities for your child's age and a bit older, with ways to make the tools yourself or use household objects.<br><br>
One thing I like to do is order catalogues from Montessori dealers and look through carfully to find what I can around town for cheaper. A few years ago the Dollar Tree had a magnetic world map that used the exact colors I needed. $1 vs. $25. I made my own bead sets for about $7.<br><br>
You can also find lesson instructions online, like these -<br><a href="http://www.bambini-montessori.com/mon_exercises.htm" target="_blank">http://www.bambini-montessori.com/mon_exercises.htm</a><br><a href="http://montessorimaterials.org/" target="_blank">http://montessorimaterials.org/</a><br><br>
and yahoo has a group just for learning how to make equipment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
I recommend that you start reading some of the Montessori books out there about doing Montessori at home. I have Montessori Play and Learn at it has helped me to set up my home (well, what little I've done) so it's conducive to Montessori. Even better, I recommend <a href="http://www.michaelolaf.net" target="_blank">www.michaelolaf.net</a> The book is free online!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>nascarbebe</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9005481"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I recommend that you start reading some of the Montessori books out there about doing Montessori at home. I have Montessori Play and Learn at it has helped me to set up my home (well, what little I've done) so it's conducive to Montessori. Even better, I recommend <a href="http://www.michaelolaf.net" target="_blank">www.michaelolaf.net</a> The book is free online!</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
I second <i>Montessori Play and Learn</i>. <i>I Can Do It! I Can Do It!</i> Is another good one as is <i>Montessori at Home</i>.<br><br>
I didn't buy any of the graduated cylinders or other pricey equipment, I made most of the things I used myself. Rough and Smooth boards, Sound Boxes, Dressing Frames-many of them are easy to make.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LilyGrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9005287"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">A great book to start with is Teach Me To Do It Myself! It's a collection of M. activities for your child's age and a bit older, with ways to make the tools yourself or use household objects.<br><br>
One thing I like to do is order catalogues from Montessori dealers and look through carfully to find what I can around town for cheaper. A few years ago the Dollar Tree had a magnetic world map that used the exact colors I needed. $1 vs. $25. I made my own bead sets for about $7.<br><br>
You can also find lesson instructions online, like these -<br><a href="http://www.bambini-montessori.com/mon_exercises.htm" target="_blank">http://www.bambini-montessori.com/mon_exercises.htm</a><br><a href="http://montessorimaterials.org/" target="_blank">http://montessorimaterials.org/</a><br><br>
and yahoo has a group just for learning how to make equipment.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
\<br><br>
Thanks for the websites, that is exactly what I was looking for! I was looking at an Ebay store that sold the same types of items that are at montessorimaterials.org!! Perfect!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the book suggestions too. I already have some Montessori books:<br>
- <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FMontessori-Start-Child-Birth-Three%2Fdp%2F0805211128%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_6%2F102-7803474-9249739%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1188246265%26sr%3D8-6" target="_blank">Montessori from the Start</a><br>
- <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FAbsorbent-Mind-Maria-Montessori%2Fdp%2F0805041567%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_sr_4%2F102-7803474-9249739%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1188246265%26sr%3D8-4" target="_blank">The Absorbent Mind</a>(Ok, I'll be honest I always get too bored with this to actually read it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: )<br>
- <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FMontessori-Science-Angeline-Stoll-Lillard%2Fdp%2F0195325265%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_7%2F102-7803474-9249739%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1188246265%26sr%3D8-7" target="_blank">Montessori The Science Behind the Genius</a><br>
- <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FBasic-Montessori-Clio-David-Gettman%2Fdp%2F185109234X%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_12%2F102-7803474-9249739%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1188246265%26sr%3D8-12" target="_blank">Basic Montessori Learning Activities for Under Fives</a><br><br>
I should probably find the Basic Montessori book and maybe it will answer some of my questions. What I really want to find is the best order to present different materials. I know in the book Montessori the Science Behind the Genius it is state more than once that it is important that some activities are completed sequentially because the activities compound on each other and to me it isn't always real apparent. Do any of the books mentioned talk about this or give an order to do some of the activities?<br><br>
SJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I forgot to ask, for those of you that do incorporate Montessori into your day what does your day look like?<br><br>
I have low shelves with some puzzles and activities that are easily accessible to both my dcs and I find DS1 gets bored quickly. Could this happen because I have too many items out that he doesn't get engrossed in his activity? Are the activities too easy for him? Should I have more activities out? Maybe he just has a short attention span <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"><br><br>
Do you use sandpaper letters? If so, did you choose italics, cursive or script and why? When did you introduce them? Do you use sandpaper numbers?<br><br>
I sure am full of questions but I would like to get more organized with this and any help is greatly appreciated from families who have btdt!!<br><br>
SJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,244 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MissSJ</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9014377"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I forgot to ask, for those of you that do incorporate Montessori into your day what does your day look like?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I'll preface this by saying I chose Montessori because I have an Aspie/highly gifted child. He is now in a Montessori school, but when he was at home I didn't confine activities to the playroom or to set hours. Our house setup includes a cabinet and low table in the breakfast nook to make meal times a more self sufficient - the cabinet holds placemats and glasses on the first shelf; plates, bowls, and silverware on the second, and cleaning supplies (rags, spray bottle, small crumber) on the third, with a miniature broom and swiffer next to the cabinet.<br>
Breakfast in the morning started with setting the table. When he was younger, it included a special place mat that had the setting drawn on with a bleach pen. Cereal is premeasured into 8oz lidded containers to make it easier, milk is transferred to a small, lidded pitcher for the same reason.<br><br>
After breakfast was clean up - dishes put in sink, mat wiped and returned to the cabinet, crumber used. Then if there was any additional mess, the table is wiped - sprayed from top to bottom, then wiped with a rag in counterclockwise circles from top to bottom (prewriting activity).<br><br>
In the playroom, the room is divided into two work areas, so that each boy can have privacy if needed. Activities are often based on a mixture of the child's interests and a nudge from me, and are changed out often - very often! The same basic activity may remain, like sorting, but at night I may switch the tweezers, or replace them with a spoon...change what is being sorted from buttons to beads. If I see something hasn't been touched, I change it out more often. I did make the request of the oldest (and the youngest followed suit) that he use at least one activity from each row of shelves per day. I have an open cubby system of 5 rows of 5, with 4 being taken up by work divided by subject and the 5th being too high to reach, so they became temporary storage. Trays were placed around the room as well, with different activities on each one.<br><br>
I can go on for quite a long time in this vein, but truth being, we've given most of it up now in favor of a school for him. I couldn't keep up at home. Even with material that had several uses, he went through them so quickly it got very hard to continue. I still use several techniques with my oldest, but nowhere near the intensity my youngest desired.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Do you use sandpaper letters? If so, did you choose italics, cursive or script and why? When did you introduce them? Do you use sandpaper numbers?<br><br>
I sure am full of questions but I would like to get more organized with this and any help is greatly appreciated from families who have btdt!!<br><br>
SJ</td>
</tr></table></div>
We did use sandpaper letters, but the sand tray was more used. We used a cursive/D'nealian approach. I didn't know if it was the "right" way, but the stick-ball Zaner-Blosser approach frustrated him to the point where he would refuse to write at all. A connected letter made more sense to him, so that is what we used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,468 Posts
I've replied to a montessori at home thread in the learning at school montessori forum, but I'll re-post here so you can find it easily<br><br>
At 2.5, the sensory/self care activities are going to keep his interest the best, I think.<br><br>
Some of our supplies are kept in a drawer low, where the children can reach them. I don't have a lot of space to keep them out, but they are easily accessible.<br><br>
The hand carved wooden eggs don't really serve any purpose. They are just neat to feel.<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/montessoridrawer.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...soridrawer.jpg</a><br><br>
Pouring beans and rice (tjat's my almost 2.5 year old doing the pouring).<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/beans.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...irls/beans.jpg</a><br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/pouringrice.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...ouringrice.jpg</a><br><br>
Pouring water<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/waterpouring.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...terpouring.jpg</a><br><br>
Mortar and pestle<br>
My dd helped me grind spices for spaghetti sauce last week with this.<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/mortarandpestle.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...randpestle.jpg</a><br><br>
Sorting beads<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/beadsorting.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...eadsorting.jpg</a><br><br><br>
Fabric/texture matching<br><br>
It took me a while, but I collected lots of remnants from the local fabric stores. And yes, there are synthetic fabrics in there. It is great for them matching using a blindfold, or even just to show descriptive adjectives - scratchy, furry, fuzzy, smooth, silky, irridescent, crinkly, etc. My sensory seeking dd2 loves these fabrics the best.<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/fabricbox.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t.../fabricbox.jpg</a><br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/fabricsquares-1.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...csquares-1.jpg</a><br><br>
Homemade sound boxes. I would prefer wood, but I have yet to find something small enough to work, so they are film canisters instead.<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/soundboxes.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...soundboxes.jpg</a><br><br>
Russian nesting dolls<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/nestingrussiandolls.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...ssiandolls.jpg</a><br><br>
And of course, by the sink I have a vegetable brush for the girls to wash their own fruit.<br><br>
Most of my supplies (wood bowls, scoops and such), came from a discount store called Tuesday Morning, really inexpensively. Some of the supplies came from Montessoriservices.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,468 Posts
A great book for montessori at home is called<br><br>
How to Raise and Amazing Child by Tim Seldin. You may find it at your local library. It's a good book to start a young child with.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,256 Posts
We've been using this book: Teaching Montessori In the Home: Preschool Years by Elizabeth Hainstock to begin our discussions of creating a montessori-esque preschool co-op among our group of AP families. I'm finding it to be a great little book. You can easily read it in a couple of hours and there are instructions and/or templates to make just about everything.<br><br>
I like that this book is specific to adapting montessori principles and practices to the in-home use.<br><br>
Last time I looked you could get a copy at Amazon for under $10 plus shipping.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
500 Posts
We use some of the books already mentioned (<i>Montessori Play and Learn</i>, <i>Teaching Montessori in the Home: The Preschool Years</i>, <i>Basic Montessori</i>), but the one that has been most useful on the topic you mentioned (sandpaper letters) has been <i>Montessori Read and Write</i>. It even has templates in the back that you can copy and make sandpaper letters with. As for the script used, it's a slanting modern manuscript style with an option to use cursive letters. We ended up using a very similar font ("MM Script") from this website since I could just print it out the templates:<br><br><a href="http://www.jmjpublishing.com/language.htm" target="_blank">http://www.jmjpublishing.com/language.htm</a><br><br><i>Montessori Read and Write</i> is very straightforward and will tell you when it's best to introduce this or that (there's a loose age range, but it's based on ability to understand). It recommended sandpaper letters be introduced when a child is able to do "level 3" of the sound game (able to answer correctly when you say, "I spy with my little eye something that starts with __"). DD is at level 4 currently. Level 5 is when they recommend introducing the movable alphabet.<br><br>
I remembered reading in a Montessori book that one can use Montessori materials and not be using Montessori method, and likewise, one can use non-Montessori materials used in a Montessori way. So when I came across <a href="http://www.janbrett.com/games/matching_numbers_game_main_page.htm" target="_blank">this Jan Brett number game</a>, I decided to print out two copies, laminated them, and with the first copy kept the illustration and numeral together, and with the second copy split up the illustration and numeral. Voilà - self-correction! That number game has worked out beautifully. DD will take one of the big cards and find the separated numeral and illustration that match it. A couple times she said, "I need the 8..." grab the 3, and when she went to place it on top of the 8 on the big card, she said to herself, "oh no, that's not an 8" and find the 8.<br><br>
Anyway, there have been some great suggestions on this thread for books and ideas. I just wanted to say that using a Montessori method with non-Montesori materials is also an option. It's inexpensive to make things yourself, but if you're feeling overwhelmed, I know I've seen a Montessori distance learning thing where someone sends you a package and consults with you over e-mail, but as I recall it was fairly expensive (compared to making your own materials, that is).
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top