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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
who are always asking what time it is??
It has gotten to the point where I'm looking for cute digital watches for her.
She's ALWAYS asking what time it is.
I'm not sure if the time means much to her-or what's going on..
She did find a Nemo watch on Ebay that she "NEEDS"
So, I'll probably get that for her.
Is this just another phase?
 

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Isn't it funny? My little also asks, "what are we doing today" or "what are we doing "amorrow".
 

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My ds (3) is also obsessed with time (what time is it? how long is 20 minutes? and other similar questions). I bought him an Usborne book about time that has clock hands he can move to match the story. That seems to be satisfying a lot of his needs at this point.
 

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Developmentally, children are figuring out time, the order of things, and are improving their memory so that they can create a script of how things run for the day. (or the week...).

Rather than a digital clock, I would recommend an analog clock (with a face and hands). This gives the child a visual way to learn about time - for example, they have a cue about how much time 10 minutes is (it's more than 5 but less than 15).

You can also get large calendars and perhaps a pictorial scheme of the day's schedule.

When you put your child to bed at night, review (in order) what you did that day and also go over what will happen the next day. This helps with developing several types of memory. It also helps them to create a script about what a typical day is like for them.
 

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My 3yo is *constantly* asking the time! I'm not even sure where she learned the question...but sometimes as often as every 30 seconds, she's asking!

We have digital and analog clocks in the house. I do my best to get her involved in figuring out the answer to the Great Time Question when I have the patience for it!
 

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I only wish my son was asking what time it is. My ds does not understand time. He doesn't even really understand yesterday or tomorrow. The only thing that is real for my ds is NOW.

(Yes, I do all the tricks to try to get him to understand time. Hasn't worked as of yet.)
 

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Both kids got digital watches at 3. It was convenient because it helped DS really nail down the higher numbers (of course, the 2 and 5 on digital are VERY confusing, so that did take longer).

They weren't ready to tell analog time until older. (well, DD was telling analog time by 5 but DS can only tell "major" times--- like the regular and half hours).
 

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My son is always asking if its twelve o'clock as that is when lunch time is. He asks sort of every five minutes or so and sometimes even just stands there getting cross with the clock as it is ticking so slow!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by ASusan View Post
You can also get large calendars and perhaps a pictorial scheme of the day's schedule.

When you put your child to bed at night, review (in order) what you did that day and also go over what will happen the next day. This helps with developing several types of memory. It also helps them to create a script about what a typical day is like for them.
We have a great Melissa and Doug magnate calander with various picture "dots" as DD calls them. Sun, rain, snow, and every holiday, pizza day, dog's BD etc etc. AWSOME!!!!

I have run through the day's sequential events after we read books and turn the light out and before I sing songs-for about a year.
Now she asks "what are we doing in the morning?" all the time.
 

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My ds (3) is also asking what time is it. If we answer "it's soon two o'clock", he says "yeah, but what time is it *now*?" I think that is sweet.

I have been thinking about making a weekly calendar for him with different colors for different days and pockets for laminated cards. We could make cards for all our usual tasks and then put them in the pockets in order. I think that would make it easier for ds to understand time.

Ds uses "yesterday" for all past time (even the same day) and "tomorrow" for future but I'm happy that he can undestand the difference between past, present and future. Maybe that daily calendar could help him understand the concept of a day.
 
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