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In the Madhur Jaffrey cookbook I just got, she recommends using mustard oil on occasion. I don't know anything about it from a nutritional standpoint - how traditional would that be? Would that be considered a vegetable/seed oil?<br><br>
(I'm currently under the impression that most vegetable/seed oils aren't a good idea, like corn, peanut, soy, safflower, etc, but wouldn't olive oil and coconut oil be technically be considered seed oils as well? What about yummy toasted sesame oil? Obviously not all seed oils are alike.)<br><br>
Thanks,<br>
Aven
 

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I look at it like this... when I eat that food, is it a fatty food? Corn and soy, obviously not - they're starchy foods. Safflower isn't really a food. And peanut has other issues - it's not so much that peanuts themselves are bad, it's that they're contaminated.<br><br>
But when you eat olives - they're fatty. Coconut is fatty. Walnuts, sunflower seeds, macadamia nuts, these are all fatty. So these are the sources of fats that I want to use.<br><br>
As for mustard oil - generally it's used for flavoring kind of like toasted sesame oil, so I wouldn't have a problem using it in small amounts. If you're really worried about it, I'd look into how it's made.
 

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According to a survey by American Heart Association, Mustard Oil is better than Olive oil from the health point of view. It is not only good for healthy people but is also good for heart patients. The reason behind the fact is that Mustard Oil comprises of 12% Omega-3 (Alpha Linolenic Fatty Acid) as compared to Olive oil (only 0.6%).

That's why mustard oil using in cooking is increasing day by day. One thing be remembered that oil extraction must be done by cold press extraction only.
 

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Mustard oil: Mustard oil has heart-healthy fatty acids. It's hard to beat for its versatility - as a cooking medium, as a dressing, as a preservative and for body massage. More importantly, it has gained global recognition in the past few years, with its market further segmented on the basis of regions; a recent report by Transparency Market Research indicates growing acceptance across North America, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, Asia-Pacific excluding Japan, and the Middle East and Africa.
 

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Hi, mustard oil has many benefits; it contains rich amounts of fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6. These fats are good as they lower the risk of developing heart disease.
 

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However, in the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration banned mustard oil because it contains erucic acid. In 2008, Food Navigator reported that high levels of erucic acid have been shown to cause fatty deposits in the heart muscles of animals.
 
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