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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our school district has the DARE program. I'm very much opposed to this program on more levels than I can state. My dd won't start it this year, but I'm wondering what my options are. Has anybody kept their child out of this? If so, how did you do it?
 

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I am not at that point yet,but was curious to know your reasons for not wanting to having your children in the program.<br>
sara
 

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From what I've heard, I think DARE is a big waste of school time, but since my oldest is only in first grade I haven't studied it in detail. Do you have any more info/links on the pro's and con's of DARE?
 

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My nephew didn't do DARE last year. I think my bil simply wrote a letter to the principal asking that his ds be allowed to have study hall or library time during DARE. My bil is opposed to anything at school that doesn't involve the 3 Rs, music, or sports.<br><br>
I am curious, though, about your reasons for opposing the program...my ds did it 3 years ago and my dd will do it this year. Ds seemed to glean alot of valuable info, that opened lots of discussion for us. The kids all adored the Sheriff's deputy that ran the program in our school.<br><br>
Can you condense your reasons and post them?
 

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DARE isn't a effective tools for preventing drug abuse in children and teens. There was a long reaching study published maybe three or four years ago about how there wasn't a difference between DARE gradute drug use and non-DARE graduate drug use. Our police department dropped the program after that came to light and so did our schools here. I'm not sure but think it was dropped state wide...<br><br>
There had been contriversy about the program before this here because of the focus placed on "tattle tailing" drug use of parents, relatives, siblings, neighbors, etc. Many parents thought that that aspect was over the top and that the program should have focused more on ways to resist peer pressure, what drug do to your bodya and brain, and why they shouldn't be involved with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OK, just to name few reasons why I'm opposed to it...<br>
(See <a href="http://www.drcnet.org/DARE/" target="_blank">http://www.drcnet.org/DARE/</a> for example)<br><br>
1. It is an enormous waste of educational time. My dd's time would be much better spent reading novels in the library or doing just about anything else.<br><br>
2. It is an enormous waste of resources, for both the school district and the police department.<br><br>
3. It doesn't work. It can also actually INCREASE drug use. It has been somewhat modified since several studies have shown that children who went through the program are more likely to use drugs, but I still have seen no compelling evidence that it has gotten substantively better.<br><br>
4. I disagree with the content and the emphasis of the program. Self-esteem is something that children develop over time from making good choices and accomplishing things. It doesn't come from a lot of "rah-rah-rah" sessions by police.<br><br>
I do not want my child brainwashed into believing that the so-called war on drugs is a good thing. I firmly believe it is a terrible thing that has perpetuated enormous amounts of suffering all over the world.<br><br>
5. While my keeping my child out won't change the school's participation in this program, I do not wish to enable 1-4 above.
 

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Good link! Thanks EFmom.<br><br>
One question that comes to mind (and I haven't read the entire drcnet info on DARE, so it may be addressed there) is this: If I refuse consent for my child to participate, wouldn't it be possible that the police department might keep this info on file and use it against me or my child in the future?
 

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I always thought it was a voluntary program that kids had to sign up for?<br><br>
I never did it when I was in school; it was never brought up. I don't even know if my school had one.<br><br>
I would also refuse it. This is really something that parents should be teaching, not strangers.
 

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I've got 1 reason I will never let my son be in the DARE program:<br><br>
A girl I know got told (verbally and in some handouts that I saw) that marajuana is exactly as addictive/dangerous/hard to quit as heroin.<br><br>
That is false, as any doctor who deals with drug addiction could tell you.<br><br>
I'm not saying I'm in favor of anyone taking either of these; but, the information is false. I know that when I was a kid, if I was confronted with false information, I immediately dismissed all the OTHER information from the same source. I don't want my son to be given lies.<br><br>
And I plan on being VERY upfront with him about drug use. In fact, I have an old friend with a bad drug problem who, if she is still alive in a few years, could be a very good example of what NOT to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
sohj, some of my reasons are similar. I remember when my nieces went through DARE several years ago. The program basically equated ALL drugs, legal or illegal. I remember my niece, who was a very serious little girl, being absolutely freaked out to see my sister consume half a glass of red wine with dinner, because she'd been taught to equate that with mainlining heroin.
 

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Yeah, and another thing, it is supposed to be a self-esteem builder. In my experience and from my observation, self-esteem comes from doing things and getting really good at them. And from loving and being loved. It does NOT come from repeating "feel good" slogans.<br><br>
I would rather my son go rock climbing or doing research in the library or learn another language or an instrument. Then he'd have something to feel good about.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by EFmom</i><br><b><br>
I do not want my child brainwashed into believing that the so-called war on drugs is a good thing. I firmly believe it is a terrible thing that has perpetuated enormous amounts of suffering all over the world.</b></td>
</tr></table></div>
Can I ask exactly what you mean by that?
 

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I am a recovering addict (started with pot and went to heroin!) but I do not think pot is bad for everyone. I don't think that just because I can't handle my own drug use, therefore my kid can't either. I don't think law enforcement has all the answers, I don't think jail rehabilitates, I think jail space is wasted on drug users when wife-beaters are let out to make room for them, I hate it that kids are put into the foster care system because their parents smoke pot and then are placed in homes where they are molested, and then not removed from those homes even when they report it themselves.<br><br>
I don't believe in laws that are meant to protect people from themselves; I don't think my kid is doomed to repeat my mistakes; I expect that someday she will experiment with drugs and I know that's not the end of the world (though it would be fine with me if she didn't want to, too!)<br><br>
I think the war on drugs is misguided - I don't see anything wrong with drugs! Just because I can't use them doesn't mean I want to take them away from everyone else.<br><br>
I'll teach my kid about drugs myself. Sex too. Oh yeah, maybe I will also teach about violence and suicide and guns. Maybe I am just the best teacher there is on many issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Can I ask exactly what you mean by that?</td>
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For the devastation we've caused with this policy in Latin America, see 'Bad Neighbor Policy: Washington's Futile War on Drugs in Latin America,' by Ted Galen Carpenter<br><br>
For an explanation of the miserable failure the war on drugs has been domestically, see Why Our Drug Laws Have Failed and What We Can Do About It, by Judge James Gray.<br><br>
The war on drugs has done absolutely nothing to reduce the supply of drugs on the street (drugs are cheaper and more abundant than ever), it has eroded our civil liberties, it has generally made the drug trade much more dangerous not only to those involved in it, but also to those innocent people caught in the cross-fire. It has resulted in the incarceration of huge numbers of people, disproportionately minorities and women, and disproportionately low level users and their families rather than large scale drug dealers.<br><br>
While we have poured almost limitless amounts of money into this effort, we have done precious little to provide for drug treatment programs which are sorely needed.
 

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Drugs are here to stay. There will always be drug users, dealers, and addicts, no matter how many DARE programs or jails there are. I would like people to address the things that make kids want to spend their lives in stupors in the first place. Happy, well-adjusted kids don't usually go past experimentation.
 

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Well spoken, Greaseball. Most kids who get seriously addicted to drugs, if you trace their history, it started with poor attachment with their parents--I'm not talking about crying it out here, but serious family issues that disrupted their ability to form decent attachments (even by mainstream society's standards!)<br><br>
I say pour the money into drug treatment, or better yet......family support for very young moms and dads so they can better raise their children.....how about guaranteed, paid family leave for the first year of every child's life! Now I'm on a roll...............
 

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DS was in FIRST GRADE when they started to teach him a song called "Don't Eat the Candy" which was about not picking up anything that looked like candy from the floor, and then eating it because it might be DRUGS.<br>
There is a certain amount of sense in this, admittedly, but hey -- I don't drop DRUGS all over my house, and I was offended that this began when he was six years old.<br>
He's now in a private school where they don't participate in DARE.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">DS was in FIRST GRADE when they started to teach him a song called "Don't Eat the Candy" which was about not picking up anything that looked like candy from the floor, and then eating it because it might be DRUGS.</td>
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Uhhh, how about "don't eat the candy, because its been on the floor you don't know what it is and thats gross."? the last thought on my mind when DD or DS is trying to eat stuff off a random floor is "it could be drugs" more like, "it could be squirell poop"<br><br>
Kay
 

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Drugs are very expensive! Why would people just drop them all over the ground?!<br><br>
No, I was always told not to eat the candy because it had sawdust sticking to it, or was freshly drooled on.
 
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