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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just found out I'm pregnant again and I'm nervous... mainly about the labor.
My first was a c-section (I believe now it was totally unnessesary but I was really young and didn't know better, basically failure to progress) second was an amazing homebirth and third was another c-section, (this was due to post dates and malpositioning.)

Obviously I'm starting to research a ton on VBACS and rupture etc...
so what I'm wondering is has anyone actually ruptured before? I keep hearing all these wonderful VBAC stories and while yes of course I want to read those I also want to be realistic and understand that a rupture can happen. I'm wondering What does it feel like etc?
 

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I've had 2 c-sections, and when I first started really researching, I was pretty caught up in the "risk of rupture" stuff too. Then I got into seriously reading and found that the risk of rupture is realistically about 1 in 800 for a woman with a low-transverse double incision (although traditional stats will cite it much higher because they're basing it on risk of rupture with interventions like Pitocin, cytotec, artificial rupture of membranes, and all that).

As it turns out, the REAL risk for moms who have had c-sections is placental problems. Placenta Previa and Accreta increase by huge numbers for each c-section you've had. You're less likely to get pregnant in the first place after a c-section, more likely to miscarry early on from the placenta not attaching correctly due to scar tissue, and more likely to have Accreta or Previa at the end of the pregnancy after each subsequent c-section. Ideally, c-sections are only good for women who are only having ONE child in their lifetime. Two is absolute max. That's not to say you can't have more and still have c-sections, but your risk truly does skyrocket at that point. And with each c-section, the risk goes up a lot more! So it's better to call it quits NOW while you've just had ONE c-section than to have more c-sections and try it then.

If you want a fantastic book to read about birth and VBAC, I highly recommend 'Pushed: The Painful Truth about Modern Maternity Care' by Jennifer Block. Sooooooo informative and incredible. And it'll give you all your exact statistics on rupture, placenta problems, and everything else you can think of!

And as the previous poster said, ican-online.org is a great source for you too!
 

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There is a woman on the c/s mama's thread that did rupture, I can't remember her name though. She's on that thread somewhere.
 

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I also don't know of anyone who's ever ruptured, personally, but my OB told me she only had ONE in the fifteen years she's been doing VBAC deliveries and that woman has gone on to have more children since her rupture (and the baby was fine, btw). That sounded pretty heartening to me!
 

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I only know of 1 rupture. The baby did die. But, the woman never had a csect before..she was not a vbac. It was not a vbac issue.

Also, even in the stats for ruptures...no one ever ruptures from going in to labor naturally. People have ruptured from cytotec...but that is not vbac related. It is done on women with no past csects and they still have a 5% rupture rate.

In all my years of having children, doing vbacs, going to bereaved parents group and online groups like this, the only rupture I know of was above, and the woman was induced and not a vbac.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Lisa1970 View Post
Also, even in the stats for ruptures...no one ever ruptures from going in to labor naturally.
That is absolutely untrue. Ruptures do happen from spontaneous labor.

Rainbowfairymomma, there is a tribe here I believe in the finding your tribe forum about moms after rupture, and I know if you search the VBAC forum some of them have posted on threads here before.

Uterine rupture is very rare, but it is definitely good to understand the risks while making your decision on whether or not to vbac.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by thorn View Post
Rainbowfairymomma, there is a tribe here I believe in the finding your tribe forum about moms after rupture, and I know if you search the VBAC forum some of them have posted on threads here before.
thanks I will look for that.

and thanks to everyone else who has replied!
 

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I had a UR in my VBAC attempt with my second child. I had a natural, spontaneous labor. My baby did die.

Here is the UR tribe, but it is long inactive:

http://www.mothering.com/discussions...+rupture+tribe

ETA: There is also the "All Children By C-section Tribe" which has some rupture stories in it.

If you search on mine and some other MDC mama user names in the above thread, you'll find our stories.

While rupture is very unlikely, it is a real risk and saying it "only happens to...." or "never happens to...." is not true and not helpful.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by egoldber View Post
While rupture is very unlikely, it is a real risk and saying it "only happens to...." or "never happens to...." is not true and not helpful.
Exactly. It is a real risk that ANYONE giving birth, particularly with a VBAC, needs to know and accept. It shouldn't PREVENT someone from going for a VBAC or HBAC if they feel based on their unique situation that they are a good candidate for VBAC, but nobody should ever come out of a VBAC UR situation, should you be in the TINY percentage who experience that, declaring that nobody told them it was a possibility or that it wouldn't happen if (fill in the blank). We all take on that small risk when we choose to VBAC. Or have a baby. But it is a very SMALL risk, the kind of tiny risk that doesn't prevent us from doing other life-affirming and life-fulfilling things that we all do every day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I appreciate all the feedback. Still gathering information on what happends if you have a rupture and how to recognise one.

egoldber I'm SO SORRY to hear about your precious baby boy...
 

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My old ob had a total of three in his career. none recently, none with catastrophic loss, thank goodness. One was a first time mother; first time labor. of the other two both were vbamc and premature labor and hard cervices (if I recall correctly).

It can happen and it's a real risk, just not as huge a risk as many obs will tell you it is. only .4 to .7% and the vast majority are not catastrophic ruptures.
 

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Not IRL, but I knew one mother reasonably well online in a different website who had a rupture during a HBAC. I can't recall if she'd had one or two prior c/s, but I know she'd had a hospital VBAC that went fine. Her baby died. She was okay. I know that isn't very helpful. I agree with the pp who said it is a very small, but real, risk.
 

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I had a large dehiscence they found doing the RCS after my VBAC attempt (natural starto labor, got fully dilated and baby wouldn't budge after 4.5 hours of pushing).
 

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I had two successfull VBAC's. When I was trying to decide between an ERC and a VBAC with DS2 my dr gave me some wonderful advice--he basically told me the following things which helped me make my decision:

--we wouldn't let you try a VBAC if we didn't think you were a good candidate and we felt the success and safety level were high
--the chance of rupture is only slightly higher for a vbac than a "regular" vaginal birth.
--even if you rupture it does not always mean you or the baby dies or you lose your reproductive organs. it can happen but it is rare.
--a properly handled, low intervention VBAC is safer than an ERC if the mother is a prime candidate.
--any type of childbirth involves risk. No type of birth is risk free. You need to investigate your choices and risks and personally accept the ones that feel the most comfortable to YOU.
--And you need to accept that even though you might want/plan a certain type of birth, for your safety and that of the baby's that plan might change during the course of labor.
 

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bolding mine

Quote:

Originally Posted by hmbay View Post
I had two successfull VBAC's. When I was trying to decide between an ERC and a VBAC with DS2 my dr gave me some wonderful advice--he basically told me the following things which helped me make my decision:

--we wouldn't let you try a VBAC if we didn't think you were a good candidate and we felt the success and safety level were high
--the chance of rupture is only slightly higher for a vbac than a "regular" vaginal birth.
--even if you rupture it does not always mean you or the baby dies or you lose your reproductive organs. it can happen but it is rare.
--a properly handled, low intervention VBAC is safer than an ERC if the mother is a prime candidate.
--any type of childbirth involves risk. No type of birth is risk free. You need to investigate your choices and risks and personally accept the ones that feel the most comfortable to YOU.
--And you need to accept that even though you might want/plan a certain type of birth, for your safety and that of the baby's that plan might change during the course of labor.
I think that these two things are key. There is risk of complications with any birth, and it's good to be aware of what the risks actually are. When choosing between a VBAC or a RCS, you have to consider that both options contain risks. VBAC gives you a slightly increased chance of UR (I think it's something like .4% if you go into labor naturally). Now if UR occurs and it's not treated promptly, the results can be very severe (death of baby, hystorectomy). RCS increases your risk of infection and complications from major surgery. It also increases long term health risks for the baby (breathing problems, asthma later on, etc). Plus with each RCS, your risk for future pregnancies compound on each other (placenta accreta, placenta abruption, miscarriage, UR during labor, etc).

So really, you just have to weigh out the risks and benefits of your otpions.
 
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