Mothering Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<p>I am wanting to follow the diet for this pregnancy, and I would just like some input from others who have followed it with success.  My last pregnancy was healthy, but at around 37 weeks my BP spiked (140/90). I had no other symptoms of pre-e, so they just diagnosed it as PIH. I think if the midwives I was seeing would have been a little hands on and involved, we could've gotten it down bc at that time I had NO idea how nutrition could play such a huge role. I went into labor at 38+3 (thankfully..they wanted to induce at 39wks.) Also, I am a really anxious person so I think that plays a role in the reading..once I was in labor and comfortable it was back down to normal range. ANYWAY, I am a little nervous about this happening again. We are planning a homebirth, but I've yet to see my midwife to talk to her about it. I read a bit on the diet and it seems like A LOT of food..hah I am a bit conflicted on exercise also. Common sense would tell me that exercise would be helpful, but there are some articles on the Brewer website that say it is dangerous. Thanks mamas!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,780 Posts
<p>hmm...I probably shouldn't answer, because I don't follow it exactly, but I did read about it. I try to eat high protein, 2 eggs with cheese in the morning. I don't drink a lot of milk I am lactose intolerant, so I really can't.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>From what I have read, high levels of vit d may help with pre-e</p>
<p><a href="http://www.pregnancytoday.com/articles/pregnancy-nutrition-and-recipes/vitamin-d-and-preeclampsia-5055/3/" target="_blank">http://www.pregnancytoday.com/articles/pregnancy-nutrition-and-recipes/vitamin-d-and-preeclampsia-5055/3/</a></p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
<p>I tried to follow it with my last pregnancy and it was hard.  It is A LOT of food.  Especially if you don't want to be eating meat all the time.  I drank a lot of milk and if at the end of the day I felt like I hadn't had enough protein, I would make a yogurt smoothie with a scoop of whey protein.  My pregnancy and birth were without complication.  I did gain 50 pounds or more, but I was pretty small when I got pregnant.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>This pregnancy I just can't make myself do it.  For whatever reason I am really not into food.  I try to make sure I eat some protein, but I know it's not as much as I was eating when I was doing the Brewer diet.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
<p>i followed it to a T w/ my last PG.  But i gained a LOT of weight.  it's a lot of food.  DS was born 1 week early.  Other than than, everything was normal.  I am 24 weeks now and haven't started it in earnest yet.  I am going to start counting protein soon, but I am going to probably eat less this time around b/c it was REALLY hard for me to get the weight off before.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
<p>Yes.  I followed it to a T the whole time and developed severe pre-eclampsia (BP of 210/190) in week 27, requiring my son to be born at week 28.  I think it blames women for developing pre-e and frankly find it offensive when someone says, "Oh, didn't you know about the Brewer Diet?" when they find out about my pre-e.  There's a thread on a forum for women who have had pre-e that deals with it as well, where many women share similar experiences (such as having the highest protein count their peri. had ever seen despite following the diet, etc.).  Dr. Brewer's idea of what causes pre-e is outdated - they aren't sure, but now they are thinking it's more of a kind of allergic reaction, not a problem with the blood ("toxemia").</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Exercise IS helpful (in moderation - don't wear yourself out, obviously!).  Eating plenty of high-quality protein but plenty of fruits and veggies and whole grain, too.  I'm also taking low-dose aspirin, fish oil, and at least 2000 IU of vitamin D daily during this pregnancy.   Basically, keep yourself in good shape!  Pre-e is much less common in second pregnancies.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
<p>I am, I don't follow it strictly but I do use it to make choices about what I eat. I do love protien and milk though! I have trouble with the servings of whole grain part.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>There was a woman I know who recently had twins, they were 8 and 7 pounds, the doctors were amazed at how big and healthy they were! She fully credits the Brewer diet.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I am only 29 weeks, so cannot really say anything about it other than I am doing fine now, low BP and no swelling at all. But time will tell.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
<p>I have read on the boards that you can have TOO much protein.  I started working w/ a nutritionist this PG b/c I am casein free (no milk, cheese, etc, etc), and she said according her 'nutritionist book' that 71g is the limit of protein you should have when PG.  I was eating 100g somedays w/ my son.  This time, I am just trying to use common sense - I still will try to push the protein over the carbs, and I try to get the 2 eggs a day and all the fruits/veggies that Brewer recommends, but I can't force myself to eat all that food again.  And actually the one thing I didn't follow to a T the last time was the 2 pats of butter (or the 2 fat servings a day) b/c really if you are eating cheese or beef or avacado . . . I just think most people have plenty of fat in their diet. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
<p>i've been trying to follow the brewer diet - not perfectly, but closer than my usual diet - and was just told that my cholesterol is up. i've never had that before! i was hoping to stave off pre-e this time with the diet, but i think i might have to go back to a more moderate diet. and i definitely can't eat that much food.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
<p>Thanks for the replies. I suppose it is different for every women as to whether it works or not. I struggled yesterday to eat all of the food required..it really is A LOT of food. I'm not really sure I am going to be able to follow it to a T, but I'm going to try. While I'm not really worried about gaining weight, I don't want to gain way too much and be so miserable I can't enjoy the pregnancy. I have looked around to see if there were any daily meal plans for the diet. I'm just curious what and when women eat to get all of the food in for a day.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
<p>I did the diet with my first and now up to 34 weeks with the second. It was good for me. I have gained 30lbs so far, not too much. I don't feel overwhelmed my the amount of food. For example,</p>
<p> </p>
<p>breakfast, 2 eggs, toast with butter and milk. That's only about 500 calories.</p>
<p>For lunch, milk, a salad, maybe a piece of fruit. Only about 400 or so.</p>
<p>A snack with milk, bread, fruit, maybe. 300 calories.</p>
<p>Dinner with meat, greens or other green veggies and potatoes, that's like 500 or 600 cals.</p>
<p>I have yogurt or more milk for a bedtime snack.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>That's the diet: 1 quart of milk, 2 eggs, 2 servings of greens, an orange veggie, a total of 75 grams of protein and three servings of fat. I don't always get all the grains in, but my midwife said not to worry about all the grains as long as I don't feel hungry. I don't count calories, I just eat the requirements and that fills me up. A lot of the stuff doubles for other things. For example, there is a separate check box on the form for vitamin c and for fruit, so just eat a grapefruit and check two boxes. The quart of milk has four boxes, but cheese can count for those servings. We have also put eggs into oatmeal and that makes it a super protein food.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>The diet is not for everyone, but I just wanted to show that you don't have to gain a huge amount of weight or feel over stuffed to follow it. The diet is also not the end-all solution for pregnancy problems. I had high bp with my first, but I have pretty low bp with this one. Same diet. I've gained a lot less weight this time, too. Same diet.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
<p><br><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>GracieP</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1279079/anyone-following-or-have-experience-with-the-brewer-diet#post_16046892"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-right:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-bottom:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I did the diet with my first and now up to 34 weeks with the second. It was good for me. I have gained 30lbs so far, not too much. I don't feel overwhelmed my the amount of food. For example,</p>
<p> </p>
<p>breakfast, 2 eggs, toast with butter and milk. That's only about 500 calories.</p>
<p>For lunch, milk, a salad, maybe a piece of fruit. Only about 400 or so.</p>
<p>A snack with milk, bread, fruit, maybe. 300 calories.</p>
<p>Dinner with meat, greens or other green veggies and potatoes, that's like 500 or 600 cals.</p>
<p>I have yogurt or more milk for a bedtime snack.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>That's the diet: 1 quart of milk, 2 eggs, 2 servings of greens, an orange veggie, a total of 75 grams of protein and three servings of fat. I don't always get all the grains in, but my midwife said not to worry about all the grains as long as I don't feel hungry. I don't count calories, I just eat the requirements and that fills me up. A lot of the stuff doubles for other things. For example, there is a separate check box on the form for vitamin c and for fruit, so just eat a grapefruit and check two boxes. The quart of milk has four boxes, but cheese can count for those servings. We have also put eggs into oatmeal and that makes it a super protein food.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>The diet is not for everyone, but I just wanted to show that you don't have to gain a huge amount of weight or feel over stuffed to follow it. The diet is also not the end-all solution for pregnancy problems. I had high bp with my first, but I have pretty low bp with this one. Same diet. I've gained a lot less weight this time, too. Same diet.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p>Thanks! I have found like eating like this has made me not crave sugar...and before I found out I was preg I was a MAJOR sugar addict. It has also helped me realize how much my diet lacked in my last pregnancy. It's not that I ate terrible, but I definitely wasn't getting near enough of all the nutrients I needed. I am curious as to how the eggs added to oatmeal turned out?? Those are my two favorite breakfast foods, and I've always wondered if there was a way to combine them..</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
<p>I had a sugar problem, too, that I resolved shortly before my first pregnancy. I didn't realize how just eating sugar made me want to eat more sugar! I thought it was a weakness of character thing, but it was really a biological thing. I'm so glad to be off the sugar highs and sugar lows. I rarely eat sweets now. The eggs and oatmeal are good. The eggs don't really have much flavor so it just thickens the oatmeal. It's an easy way to add more protein but not feel like your eating ANOTHER egg breakfast.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
<p>Just for kicks, some time ago, I calculated the calories of  what they say is minimum with the BD and did it with the foods I like best and it came out to be 1600 calories.  That is certainly NOT a lot of food.  It all depends on your choices of the foods whether it's whole milk or 1%, what type of meat, etc.  I can eat well beyond 2000 right now, but I've gained 1 pound, so that's about maintenance for me.  But, I would guess that the minimum requirements for BD is maintenance for most mamas.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Also, BD has been proven (by experience) to help women stop PreE or prevent it, BUT not all women.  Obviously, there are various reasons for PreE and some have to do with diet.  So, ruling out BD across the board, because some women haven't been helped by it is not helpful - what about all those that have?  Plus, some mama that may be helped by it, may decide she shouldn't do it based on what other mamas say and miss out on the benefits.  On an average day, I have 90g of protein, pregnant or not.  The only pregnancy that gave me problems was the one that I had a processed diet on and low protein.  I had PE on that one.  Once I changed my diet to a whole foods based one (Maker's Diet), my pregnancies went smooth, I had no swelling, normal BP, no visual disturbances, etc. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>So, there's definitely something to be said about diet.  I think it's way too overlooked in general for a myriad of health problems, pregnant or not.  It's important always, but especially while pregnant.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,259 Posts
<p>IMO, the higher protein and no salt restriction and focus on whole foods are the good parts of this diet. I would not put my efforts into eating every specific thing he recommended every single day. I tried with my first pregnancy and couldn't do it. 6 servings of grains is way too much. Get a copy of Nina Planck's 'Real Food for Mother and Baby' and read it. Eat lots of real food, salt your food to taste with real, unprocessed salt, eat good fats and proteins, drink plenty of water.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I am not sure I buy the hype of the Brewer diet anymore. I've known women who followed it and still had problems with preeclampsia. A good whole-foods based diet is good for everyone though and pregnant women need *real* salt in their diets. If that is all you take away from it, then you are doing great imo.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>As far as too much protein, if you are eating a low-fat, high-protein diet, you can go into what they call "rabbit starvation". You *must* eat your protein with enough fat.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,259 Posts
<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">
<div>Obviously, there are various reasons for PreE and some have to do with diet.  So, ruling out BD across the board, because some women haven't been helped by it is not helpful - what about all those that have?</div>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>I absolutely think if someone is having issues, she should at least try it, but my problem, what I called "the hype" was that Brewer claimed it helped 100% of women....</p>
<p> </p>
<p><span style="color:rgb(62,123,216);font-size:1.2em;"><strong>“… If we argue 1.0% <a class="term" href="http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/glossary/m/mtlp/" target="_blank" title="Go to definition">MTLP</a><a class="term" href="http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/glossary/m/mtlp/" target="_blank" title="Go to definition"><img alt="Metabolic-Toxemia-of-Late-Pregnancy---th..." src="http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/wp-content/plugins/glossary/images/icon_info_14.gif" style="width:16px;height:16px;" title="Metabolic Toxemia of Late Pregnancy - th..."></a> [<a class="term" href="http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/glossary/t/toxemia/" target="_blank" title="Go to definition">toxemia</a><a class="term" href="http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/glossary/t/toxemia/" target="_blank" title="Go to definition"><img alt="As-defined-by-the-1997-Merriam-Webster-M..." src="http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/wp-content/plugins/glossary/images/icon_info_14.gif" style="width:16px;height:16px;" title="As defined by the 1997 Merriam-Webster M..."></a>] with the Brewer Diet … that’s still one per hundred, ten per thousand, ten thousand per million. I am saying zero, 0, zip, NONE per million ….”(From BlueRibbonBaby.Org)</strong></span></p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>This claim isn't helpful because it doesn't always work and pre-e isn't always about diet. Also, it was taught to me and is still being taught to women to eat low-fat. Low-fat combined with high protein can be dangerous.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
<p>First...like somebody mentioned PE/BP problems are much more common in first pregnancies.  There is a chance that you'll be fine this time.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>However, I would make a suggestion...just from my personal experience.  With baby #1 I failed my 1-hr glucose tolerance test and barely passed the 3-hr at 24 weeks.  I had some mean PIH towards the end (170/110 by delivery, started going up around 34 weeks), but was never diagnosed with PE as I never had protein in my urine, liver or kidney function labs were fine, etc ...  It took several months for my BP to go down afterwards, but still remained slightly elevated even then.  With baby #2 my BP was fine until about 26ish weeks and then it slowly started to climb.  At 30ish weeks my BP was already 140/90 and THEN I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes...I failed by one point, literally.  I started monitoring my blood sugar, but more importantly started following a diabetic diet and exercising daily.  My BP totally normalized a couple weeks after starting the diet...I stayed at 110/65 the rest of the pregnancy. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>So, my recommendation...limit your carb and sugar intake.  Stay away from soda and juice...stick to water.  Make sure to pair carbs with ample protein...but don't feel like your need to consume huge amounts of food.  I think one of the reasons that the Brewer Diet seems to work for some women is because it is somewhat similar to a diet you might follow as a gestational diabetic.  But I believe PE and PIH have different root causes.  Brewer Diet might work very well to prevent PIH, but just judging from what I've seen and heard I just don't think it's going to prevent PE all the time. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I also recommend the Nina Planck book...it's got some great advice. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>GracieP</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1279079/anyone-following-or-have-experience-with-the-brewer-diet#post_16049674"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-right:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-bottom:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I had a sugar problem, too, that I resolved shortly before my first pregnancy. I didn't realize how just eating sugar made me want to eat more sugar! I thought it was a weakness of character thing, but it was really a biological thing. I'm so glad to be off the sugar highs and sugar lows. I rarely eat sweets now. The eggs and oatmeal are good. The eggs don't really have much flavor so it just thickens the oatmeal. It's an easy way to add more protein but not feel like your eating ANOTHER egg st.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p>Yeah, sweets have always been a problem for me. Other than my sweet tooth, I have always eaten healthy. I still sneak a few chocolate covered raisins..or sometimes I'll add a little honey and cinnamon to my yogurt.  I'm def going to try the eggs and oatmeal idea..Thanks!</p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>fruitfulmomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1279079/anyone-following-or-have-experience-with-the-brewer-diet#post_16049782"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-right:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-bottom:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>IMO, the higher protein and no salt restriction and focus on whole foods are the good parts of this diet. I would not put my efforts into eating every specific thing he recommended every single day. I tried with my first pregnancy and couldn't do it. 6 servings of grains is way too much. Get a copy of Nina Planck's 'Real Food for Mother and Baby' and read it. Eat lots of real food, salt your food to taste with real, unprocessed salt, eat good fats and proteins, drink plenty of water.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I am not sure I buy the hype of the Brewer diet anymore. I've known women who followed it and still had problems with preeclampsia. A good whole-foods based diet is good for everyone though and pregnant women need *real* salt in their diets. If that is all you take away from it, then you are doing great imo.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>As far as too much protein, if you are eating a low-fat, high-protein diet, you can go into what they call "rabbit starvation". You *must* eat your protein with enough fat.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p>I have read Real Food by Nina Planck. I may call my library to see if they have that one. I don't eat processed and eat as much organic foods as possible. I also eat "whole" foods..none of the low fat stuff (whole milk, whole fat cheeses, etc.) I drink TONS of water..I'm actually worried I may drink too much. I was drinking lots of herbal teas, but the site says those can be dangerous so now I'm not so sure. Also, I only use kosher and sea salt..is that considered "good" salt?? I would love to be able to afford all of the fancy salts at the health food stores..but that is kind of unrealistic.</p>
<p> </p>
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>purplestraws</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1279079/anyone-following-or-have-experience-with-the-brewer-diet#post_16050624"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-right:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-bottom:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>First...like somebody mentioned PE/BP problems are much more common in first pregnancies.  There is a chance that you'll be fine this time.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>However, I would make a suggestion...just from my personal experience.  With baby #1 I failed my 1-hr glucose tolerance test and barely passed the 3-hr at 24 weeks.  I had some mean PIH towards the end (170/110 by delivery, started going up around 34 weeks), but was never diagnosed with PE as I never had protein in my urine, liver or kidney function labs were fine, etc ...  It took several months for my BP to go down afterwards, but still remained slightly elevated even then.  With baby #2 my BP was fine until about 26ish weeks and then it slowly started to climb.  At 30ish weeks my BP was already 140/90 and THEN I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes...I failed by one point, literally.  I started monitoring my blood sugar, but more importantly started following a diabetic diet and exercising daily.  My BP totally normalized a couple weeks after starting the diet...I stayed at 110/65 the rest of the pregnancy. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>So, my recommendation...limit your carb and sugar intake.  Stay away from soda and juice...stick to water.  Make sure to pair carbs with ample protein...but don't feel like your need to consume huge amounts of food.  I think one of the reasons that the Brewer Diet seems to work for some women is because it is somewhat similar to a diet you might follow as a gestational diabetic.  But I believe PE and PIH have different root causes.  Brewer Diet might work very well to prevent PIH, but just judging from what I've seen and heard I just don't think it's going to prevent PE all the time. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I also recommend ina Planck book...it's got some great advice. </p>
</div>
</div>
<p>Thank you! Yeah, I have heard that even if it happens once doesn't neccessarily mean it will happen again. I was like that too, labs and urine was fine, just my bp was high. What kind of diet did you follow to get it down the 2nd time when you were diagnosed with GD?<br>
 </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,259 Posts
<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">
<div>Also, I only use kosher and sea salt..is that considered "good" salt?? I would love to be able to afford all of the fancy salts at the health food stores..but that is kind of unrealistic.</div>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>Eh, I don't know that everyone would agree, but I use the cheap sea salt (Whole Foods brand) and think that is good enough. I mean, if you can't afford better you just can't. Any minimization of processing is a good thing imo.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">
<div>.I'm actually worried I may drink too much. I was drinking lots of herbal teas, but the site says those can be dangerous so now I'm not so sure</div>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>Which site? Certainly some herbs can be dangerous in pregnancy, but specially prepared pregnancy teas are made from herbs that have been used traditionally for a long time. If you have a history of reoccuring miscarriages or preterm labor I would not use RRL tea but other than that I think they are fine.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
<p><br><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>fruitfulmomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1279079/anyone-following-or-have-experience-with-the-brewer-diet#post_16051159"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-right:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-bottom:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p> </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">
<div>Also, I only use kosher and sea salt..is that considered "good" salt?? I would love to be able to afford all of the fancy salts at the health food stores..but that is kind of unrealistic.</div>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>Eh, I don't know that everyone would agree, but I use the cheap sea salt (Whole Foods brand) and think that is good enough. I mean, if you can't afford better you just can't. Any minimization of processing is a good thing imo.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">
<div>.I'm actually worried I may drink too much. I was drinking lots of herbal teas, but the site says those can be dangerous so now I'm not so sure</div>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>Which site? Certainly some herbs can be dangerous in pregnancy, but specially prepared pregnancy teas are made from herbs that have been used traditionally for a long time. If you have a history of reoccuring miscarriages or preterm labor I would not use RRL tea but other than that I think they are fine.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>The Brewer Diet website..it says that even herbal pregnancy teas have diuretic properties that can contribute to blood pressure problems. I didn't read all of the info.<br><br>
 </p>
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top