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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
nak<br><br>
Slowly progressing in quest for sustainsable living...gonna try growing amaranth this year but don't have a mill yet.<br><br>
What grains have you tried growing (& what zone)? How much? What was "easiest" to grow annd mill? What mill do you have/recommend?<br><br>
Tips please--thank you!
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/notes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="notes">:<br>
Is it practical for us new englanders to grow grains? How much land do you need? Thanks
 

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I have never grown my own grain (growing blue corn and wheat this summer). I do have a grain mill that I LOVE-the Country Living Grain Mill. It is hand cranked, and you can get really fine flour. It can also be hooked up to an exercise bike or a small motor if you're feeling really industrious. It is really well made in the USA, and although a little more expensive than other mills (around $300) it will last forever, and is really quite easy to crank compared to other cheaper models I tried. The flour tastes like nothing else, and I hope the grain that I grow myself and then mill myself will taste that much better. Best of luck and many blessings on a prosperous growing season!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't know if you need a lot of land to grow grains--I guess it depends on what you are growing and how much your family needs. Amaranth (and there are many varieties) produces a lot of grain per plant, which is one reason I am thinking of trying. I will start it indoors in the next week or two. It probably isn't super practical but MUCH healthier than anything you can buy. And from what Hairylegs says, much tastier.<br><br>
So, Hairylegs, where do you buy your grain? Are you milling wheat berries? I read a review in Mother Earth News (mag) a while back on mills. Is the one you have one with a really big wheel and painted dark green--traditional looking? I'm glad to hear it is easy to crank--that is my concrn with a manual, however, even if I get an electric I would want one that converts to manual. Goodluck with your crop!!!
 

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The grain mill that I have is not the green one-the Diamant-that one is sooo nice but well out of our price range (600-700 bucks). I have a white one-it was also in the Mother Earth News reviews, Country Living Grain Mill. I buy my wheat and rye berries from our local co op in the bulk bins, but will buy them from a local Mennonite family that runs a bakery soon, they can sell them to me in 50lb. sacks (organic) at cost. I'm sure that whatever we grow won't be enough to provide my whole family what we need, but it will be a start toward self reliance! It was fun to research all the mill and grain options out there.
 

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hey janet! check out lehmans.com. they have an assortment of grain mills. (we want to get the "our best grain mill" because it's so versitile and less expensive than others)<br><br>
we've never grown grain but perhaps we will when we eventually get the mill...we are growing flint corn this year. grains are rather intensive...a lot of work to harvest etc... especially if you can buy organic grains from a buying club or co-op for less than a buck/pound. We plan on getting grains from Butterworks Farm when we get a mill.<br><br>
Buuuut...i think it'd be great to try and fun to do with autumn--to grow, harvest and grind your own grains! What a learning experience!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well hey there, Kris!<br><br>
Yeah, I hope the amaranth experiment is successful. Even if I don't get a mill this year, we can still eat the greens and use the grains for cereal...<br><br>
I really want Autumn more involved in gardening this year. She has already started peppers and some dried meadow-flower seeds she picked out back last week--she's really into it! I think it is so important for kids to see that food comes not just from the grocery store and to learn how to grow, harvest, store, and use it is a bonus. She said she wants to help me sell flowers at market this year, too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> How perfect for home(un)schooling, huh?<br><br>
Is Butterworks Farm in VT?
 

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yeah...butterworks is in vt, but close to canada. they are the great yogurt makers (sold at rafc or rnfm, i mean) <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> it's a neat homestead-expanded-to-larger-farm operation. a friend of mine said that he thought they would be willing to bring grains down this way because they come down this way once a month or something.<br><br>
i'm glad that autumn is getting more involved with growing. we also think it's so great that our kids will learn about food from seed to harvest to saving/preparing... i think i take it for granted that kaylo can experience this--so many kids aren't able to.<br><br>
there was a homeschooled girl who used to bring in eggs to sell at the co-op. it was part of her schooling--raising chicks, feeding and caring for them, collecting eggs, making receipts and taking care of all the math. i thought it was so cool! sounds like autumn will be doing something similar with the market... so much to learn with the gardening, selling, hanging out at the market-how fun! wish i could have been "schooled" like that too! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 
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