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We now have a nest with baby raccoons underneath our enclosed porch. DH and I are dreading having to pay big bucks to get someone to come and trap them. Also, I don't think the babies have come out of the nest yet, so they won't be gone for a while.<br><br>
What are the dangers to having them nest down there? It doesn't SEEM like they are destroying anything just yet. DH was talking to someone who recommended throwing a bag of wet mothballs in there to drive them out. I don't want that in MY house I said. I'd rather have raccoons.<br><br>
We don't delude ourselves that we will be rid of them. They are very bold in our area. But we want to get them out long enough to close up the space they're in.<br><br>
Someone else in the area trapped and tagged raccoons and released them in a pretty natural ravine a few miles from his home. The exact same ones nested in his house again!<br><br>
Any ideas, advice?
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">:<br><br>
Raccoon babies sound adorable!
 

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The only danger I would personally be very concerned about (other than damage to your house, which may not be very likely in this situation), would be raccoon roundworm. Raccoons are often infected with these worms, and worm eggs are shed in their feces. It takes about 2-4 weeks fot the eggs to become infective. After that, if a person (say, a child who was playing in dirt contaminated by old raccoon droppings) swallows an egg, the worm larva can end up migrating to a part of the body where it can cause serious damage (like the eyes or brain.) The eggs can survive in the dirt long after the droppings are rotted away and no longer visible - for years, in fact.<br><br>
Here's a link to some info about raccoon roundworm:<br><br><a href="http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/ansci/animpest/v1227w.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/ans...est/v1227w.htm</a><br><br>
If raccoons are common in your area, you may well end up with raccoon droppings in your yard whether or not raccoons actually live on your property, so you should keep the risk of roundworms in mind all the time anyway. But I'd probably try to get the mother raccoon to move her babies.<br><br>
You might be able to convince her to look for a safer place by making a lot of noise, banging on the porch floor, poking under there with long sticks, putting something bad-smelling like a bowl of ammonia in there, etc. Or, if you can crawl under there (or are willing to take apart the floor), you could watch and wait until the mother leaves (probably in the evening), then remove the babies and put them in a box nearby for the mother to find, and quickly seal up the porch so she can't get back in. Or, speaking of taking apart the floor, if that's feasible, you could start doing it anytime, even during the day when the mother is there. She's pretty unlikely to try to bite you or even approach you, as long as she has some way to escape or hide. If you open it up enough that it's not a secure den anymore, she'll probably move the babies somewhere else once you go inside and leave them alone for awhile.
 
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