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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning on making an apple pie with ds this afternoon after he wakes up from his nap, and have a few questions.<br><br>
What do you use to thicken apple pies, and how much do you use? The ones I make always taste good, but can often be runny or too watery. I think I've used flour in the past, but either that doesn't work or I haven't used enough.<br><br>
And do you ever not peel the apples when you make pie? I've always peeled them, but nutritionally I like to generally not peel fruits or veggies if I don't have to. What would the problem be if I didn't peel them?<br><br>
Thanks so much.
 

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If you use flour you have to add some fat or it won't really work to thicken. Many people go 1 or 2 Tablespoons flour (tossed with the apples) and then the same amount of butter dotted about on top of the apples under the top crust. If you want to cut the fat use cornstarch instead. Toss a tablespoon or two with the apples and the juice from the apples will activate it.<br><br>
Peels, huh? They don't soften up much so they are going to really change the texture of the pie. Here's a thought. Make your pie as usual and use a lump of leftover dough and like, one apple or half an apple to make a little apple turnover to bake on the side. That way you haven't commited your whole pie to an experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, I didn't have enough apples to make the tester turnover, although I would still like to do that. I did add some butter and flour, as well as a little cornstarch for good measure, and it did thicken nicely.<br><br>
However . . . . I have a lot to learn still about apple pie. I used apples from a friend's tree, and they were way too soft of a variety. Plus, I underestimated how much the interior of the pie continues to cook after you take it out of the oven. So those two problems combined led me to a really yummy applesauce pie.<br><br>
Lessons I learned: You need a firm apple, and lots of it. Do not overcook. Don't cut until very cool. Don't make the apple slices too thin or they will disintegrate. It would probably be a good idea to layer the apples into the crust rather than pour them in, so that they are packed in nice and tightly.
 

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Here is how I make apple pie, and it usually turns out pretty darn good if I do say so myself.<br><br>
I peel my apples, usually quite a few. I tend to put about nine or ten firm apples into a pie.<br><br>
Then I cut them inot fifths or sixths..maybe even a tad smaller..mix the cut up apples in a bowl with a cup of sugar ( or more if it looks like it needs more) and what ever spices sound good..usually cinnamon and a little smidge of lemon juice and some allspice sometimes.<br><br>
Be fore I put the apple mixture into the crust I put a teaspoon of sugar and a smidge if cinnaomon onto the bottoem crust and kind of spread it around with my finger tips..just to coat it evenly.<br><br>
Then I pour my apple mix in and put buter pats, three or four, accross the top of the apple mix before I put the top crust on.<br><br>
Then the top crust, into which I cut my pine tree thing I always do, and pop it in the oven until it is done..usually a half an hour or more.Maybe closer to an hour. Just whenever the crust is browned lighty and the filling is done.<br><br>
Walla..apple pie at Beccas house.<br><br>
Sorry I am not much of a help with exact measurements.<br><br>
A smidge is something along the lines of a dab or a grunt or a pinch..you know, just enough but not too much.
 

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I always use Granny Smith apples. They are tart, and hard for a great apple pie <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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