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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do I do this? The last time I worked, it was in retail management. Then I had babies and have been home. I don't even know how to find my old district manager. Anyone btdt? I emailed corporate to see if they will give me her contact info. Also, bleh, what about references?
Anyone else return after a long absence? I am in school full time as well, which hopefully makes me a bit more credible. I am applying for human resource jobs.
 

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You've been out of the official work force for ten years, so your old references probably aren't that critical. I frequently see applicants who don't know where their old supervisors are now. I don 't know where all of mine are now! It's not an automatic bar to employment. Just do the best you can in providing the information. More and more organizations only release your hire- and termination-dates, and sometimes salary. So general HR office contacts can often fill the bill on an app.

As for your current references, who knows what you can do? College professors? Have you done any volunteer work? These people would know you now, and that's more important than what you did 10 years ago. Just don't list family, obviously.


You said HR jobs; I'm assuming that you have or are getting a degree in HR or something related? I believe most companies want experience or education for HR positions.

Don't get discouraged; getting a job often takes several months at best. Job hunting is almost a full-time job in itself!

And I always wish I could tell everyone who will ever look for a job right out of college -- just because you don't get the position, doesn't mean that you didn't make a good impression or that they would have hated to hire you. It's about finding the best match for a particular position. You never know who you're up against. If they don't hire you for one job, and you see another opening you want; apply again!

Sometimes I get 4 applicants who make me shake my head and re-advertise. Sometimes I'm lucky, and I interview 4 people who could all do the job and do it well. Then I have to pick just 1. And I hope the other 3 will apply for the next job opening. (They usually don't.
)

Good luck with your search!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I want to get into coporate training, so I am just looking for entry level positions to do while doing school.
I will do the HR of my old place. While I don't have any solid "office" work skills, but i did input payroll info, scheduled, and trained when I was in retail.
 

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My opinion is that if you can find the old supervisor to attest to you actual work habits, that would be a good thing. Additional references you can use for 'character' as opposed to work habits and style. If you pull it together and make it look professional people will take you seriously. Focus on your abilities and skills, not your time out of the workforce.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The tricky part is that I am filling out an online application.
I should make up a resume as well, and I will be extolling my virtues in the field of home education of my three sons. But, this little quickie online thing has me thrown. I will wait a day or two and see if HR gets back to me with a contact for my old supervisor. Thanks
 

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I am a hiring manager and I get those online resumes often. They don't come across nearly as well as a well done resume (many times the spacing gets all messed up, or the margins and paragraph indents). I would definitely follow up with a nice neat resume even if you fill out the online application. If you are competing with others you want your resume to stand out well above the rest. Make sure you put everything on one page if possible, and write a nice cover letter. Make sure there are no typos! (I am amazed at how many I get with typos!! and even in this age of spellcheck. This tells me the person didn't care enough to check).
 

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I agree with Lauren. Another thing to think about, is while you are working out where your 10 year old supervisors are, don't hesitate to put down what you have been doing now -- things like being a girl scout troop leader, or something along those lines can say a lot -- and gives you a current reference (the area leader) who can attest to your trustworthiness. . .

GL on the big change!
Lisa
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
see, this is the problem, I haven't really been doing anything! We have moved a lot, I homeschool, my oldest has special needs that I have been attending to, my youngest is just now 5, my husband works irregular hours. All of this has added up to me not doing any kind of volunteer work. I have been in college for the past year, so I have that.
 

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In your case IMO the best thing to do is to network. Have you spoken with your profs to see if they have contacts at area companies and would be willing to share them with you? Often colleges have career counseling/placement services/job fairs, take advantage of that. Tell your neighbors, friends, DH's coworkers, family, kids' friends' parents, other moms at the playground/story hour/whatever that you are looking and what you are looking for. Come up with a "positioning statement" that summarizes what you are looking for and what your qualifications are so you can quickly tell people when they ask. You never know who knows who or who may talk to who.

HTH and good luck!

Tracey
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is a good idea. My classes have all been online, so very few of my profs actually live here. I am going to go down and use my counseling center. And I will start putting the word out everywhere.
 
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