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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DH wants to get DD (3) a pet bunny. Of course I told him that it would be his job to clean the cage and such as DD is really too young for that but I could see her definetly wanting to help feed it. DD is very kind and loving with all anmals. She loves them all including snakes and bugs.<br>
I am more concerned about the actaul rabbit. Do they poop all over the house? Can they be litter box trained like a cat?<br>
We have a 3 mos old baby as well. Will a rabbit be health issue for him?<br>
Please tell me why I should say, "No rabbits"
 

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i had a pet bunny and she was great about only going potty in her box, except for the fact that she would poop/pee on our bed whenever we forgot to put the barrier up! but really, besides that, she only went in her box. she was a great pet. also, she chewed wires if we forgot to tape them up.<br><br>
i would only get a bunny if they were going to be able to have free range of the house, or at least a few rooms. i wouldnt get one (or any animal for that matter) if they were going to have to live primarily in a cage. its just sad.<br><br>
kind of OT, the best pet i ever had was a brown rat that i bought for 2$. she was so sweet, and lived in my room when i was still in HS. she made little nests under my bed and my couch, and only pooped/peed in those little spots, so it was easy to clean up. she scavenged paper from all over my room to make her nests, and on more than one occasion i would lose my homework and find it in her nest, all chewed up lol!. she was really sweet though, and would scurry out from under the bed whenever i came home, and loved to sit in my lap and hang out. i highly recommend rats as pets, if you have a room you can keep shut and rat-proof.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would definetly give the rabbit hopping time in our home. Will my home have to be bunny proof? I see you said yours chewed wires. Would toys all over be a problem for the bunny? I do want the rabbirt to be happy, too.<br><br>
(*no thanks on the rat <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">)
 

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Any hopping time by our bunny involved a lot of poop EVERYWHERE. While the bunnies themselves were so cute and very cuddly (one of them fetched! the other was just like a cat and hopped up on laps! aww), their cages stunk and the poop was overwhelming (I'm talking cleaning the cage atleast once or twice daily)..... my boyfriend was no good at cleaning the cage, even though it was his bunny and my house, so they bunny had to go.... it's up to you! I like them, but I didn't have time or energy for the responsibility. I think that's why I only have turtles at the moment <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah I was kind of thinking that they poop all over and are smelly.<br>
BTW it is illegal to sell pet turtles here in NJ. Of course what isn't illegal here??
 

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we had one and she was very easy to litter train, although I used straw or grass and just showed her where it was and that was it! The only training I had to. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">: she chewed the telephone cord and speaker wires but soon learnt not to and chewed a great big hole in the flyscreen, but it allowed her to come and go as she pleased. She was a lovely pet and used to curl around my ankles in the kitchen like a cat when she was hungry. Be careful coz they have sharp teeth but ours only bit the once and learnt that it was not a good idea. I must sound a bit scattered but just writing things as they pop into my head.
 

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Man, I've always wanted a pet rat! For several years now, but there has always been one reason or another why it's not a good idea to have one.<br><br>
I've always been very nervous around bunnies. With those huge teeth and powerful hind legs--they look like they could really hurt a person. How are they tempermentwise? Would I have to worry about being bit if I ever felt brave enough to hold one? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
~Nay
 

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I am a bunny lover, and have had one for a pet. It did chew wires, furniture, etc. They have specific dietary requirements and are vulnerable to illness or worse if they get hold of even slightly moldy feed, for example. Not necessarily a low maintenance pet. The poop was an issue, although she was pretty well box trained in her enclosure/pen. They are fairly sensitive to stress, and can just up and die on you, so you do need to think about whether having a pet die would be horrible for your child, or whether your child could handle that. Also, they are easily hurt by a child not knowing how to properly lift/hold them so that the bunny feels safe. If the bunny feels unsafe, for instance, they will kick/thrash, which can hurt a child (strong legs with claws/nails) or the bunny (if bunny is dropped). Bunnies can bite, too. I would not have a bunny for a child younger than about 8 (possibly older depending on the child). However, if you have older kids, who can handle caring for a sensitive and somewhat fragile pet, bunnies can be great. They can be affectionate, playful, cuddly (when feeling secure and loved), and terribly cute. Mine used to play "chase" with our cat! They had so much fun together. . . . I do miss my bunny. . . . .
 

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I would love to get my boys a bunny! We have had a menagerie of pets. Along with our 3 dogs, DH and our son are constantly finding "pets" to temporarily take in. We've had hamsters, turtles, frogs, baby mouse, and most currently a baby squirrel(looongggg story!).<br>
However, when DH and I first got married we had a rabbit for 1 day. I was amazed at the amount of poop! I could not keep up with it. I would turn around and there would be piles!<br>
So, for now, because of that issue I am going to have to pass on the idea. Even though they are cute and soft, the cleanup would drive me crazy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks so much everyone. DH is really pushing for this bunny and I am going to read him this thread. I do not want poop all over my house especially since I will have new walker next year and bunny poop is not somehitng I want to teach a baby to negotiate around.<br><br>
CAn you tell I don't really want a bunny? DH just loves animals and so do I but I am more' practical and he is bit more, "...but it's so cute and Johana would love it "<br><br>
I know my shortcomings wioth animals....I like to pet them. DH doesn't mind doing all the lbor stuff.
 

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A good friend of mine has had 3 bunnies over the past 20 years. Potty training was spotty at best. Bunnies, being ground loving animals, prefer not to be picked up and carried. I think a hamster or guinea pig might be a better choice.
 

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My cousin's rabbit (Thumper) died while my aunt and uncle were away for a long weekend and I was taking care of my little cousins and house sitting.<br><br>
I can't speak for the kids but I can say that it is traumatic for baby sitters to deal with rabbits who die... Thumper did have a good long life though and I would like to think that he would have appreciated his eulogy...
 

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I am going to be very direct and blunt. I used to do rabbit rescue. BTW, consider going with a rescue group instead of encouraging breeders.<br><br>
Some of my friends and I had a saying: "Friends don't let friends get rabbits."<br><br>
The day our last rabbit finally found a forever home, my dh and I were so excited that we went out to dinner to celebrate.<br><br>
Some people are OK with rabbit's negatives, and thrill to be with and talk about rabbits. I have met at least half a dozen of these people. Yup, they are strange, but I am glad the rabbits have them. But for most human beings, rabbits are not the right animal companion.<br><br>
Here is the real deal, the deal nobody wants you to know.<br><br>
Rabbits are insanely cute and adorable and appealling. It is hard to imagine an animal that looks and feels so delightful. They have fascinating, intoxicating personalities, and are different beings. They hop for joy and do bunny dances and it is hard to imagine a creature more wonderful than a baby rabbit.<br><br>
But rabbits are a total PITB to care for. They are a huge financial investment, because if they get even the teeniest weeniest cut or abrasion they get horrible, expensive abscesses that must be treated by veterinarians who know about rabbit care, which is very different than dog and cat care.<br><br>
Every rabbit person I know has spent hours at home with a syringe irrigating wounds and giving intramuscular injections of special drugs (rabbits can't take regular antibiotics, and will die if the vet is ignorant on this point, and most vets are ignorant). I don't consider myself a rabbit person, but I have irrigated at least a few dozen rabbit wounds and given about half a dozen shots. It was terrifying to me, because they bite and it is easy to hurt their backs.<br><br>
Rabbits vary in their abilities to relate to humans. Many bite. Their backs are fragile and easily broken is picked up improperly. They try to hop out of your arms and can really get hurt if they fall.<br><br>
One of our rabbits died from being neutered -- a horrible tragedy, especially since he went to a special rabbit veterinarian for his surgery. Spaying is even more risky.<br><br>
Rabbits need special enzymes in their food and have highly specialized nutritional needs in order to live long and healthy lives. Cleaning their cages is a huge pain and they will pee and poop on the floor and chew on furniture while it is being cleaned.<br><br>
Rabbits are very passionate. About love and war. They bond deeply with their fellow rabbits, or they hate other rabbits and will fight viciously. This is bad, because it can cause horrible expensive wounds.<br><br>
Bottom line is this: get a guinea pig or a puppy instead. I'm serious.<br><br>
If you choose to disregard my advice, all I ask is that some beautiful Saturday afternoon, when you could be at the park with the kids, after the now traditional Saturday afternoon argument with your dh over who will clean the cage, you or your dh -- when you finally break down and do it yourself, even though he said he would, but you do it out of decency and compassion -- while you are there, picking rabbit poop from the wires, think of me, remember my words, and silently acknowledge that I was right. :LOL
 

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Oh yes... I almost forgot. Forget about real litter training. The rabbit people who claim their rabbits are litter trained have rabbit poop all over the floors of their homes, they have just become desensitized to it. That means the rabbit will use the litter box most of the time (if you are lucky).
 

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My friend had a rabbit with a litter box and I never saw poop on their floors in all the times I visited. It must be a YMMV sort of thing.<br><br>
However, for a three year old, I think a more durable pet is in order. Save the pocket pets for when he's old enough to help you look up how to take care of them.
 

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Inezyv forgot to mention how highly allergic many people are to rabbits.<br><br>
but I also think that at three, my oldest DD would not have been gentle enough for a rabbit. She wouldn't intentionally hurt the bunny, but I'd be afraid for the rabbit's safety, if the rabbit were ever allowed out of its cage, supervised or not. After reading how many dead hamster threads, and several friends who have experienced similar tragedies in their homes, I don't think a hamster is appropriate for a child that young either.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sapphire_chan</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My friend had a rabbit with a litter box and I never saw poop on their floors in all the times I visited. It must be a YMMV sort of thing.<br><br>
However, for a three year old, I think a more durable pet is in order. Save the pocket pets for when he's old enough to help you look up how to take care of them.</div>
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Hmmmm..... she swept before you came over. :LOL
 
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