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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we had teacher's conference and my husband went. Eveerything was all right, the teacher is nice he says and my daughter loves her. Theyw ent through the subjects and, ok.

Except: there was no mention of arts and music.

But: my third grader got a sheet where her thigh strength, arm strength, cardiovascular abilities were measured. As in" can do so many push ups, run so many laps" etc.

This seems so fundamentally wrong to me, and not only because they are her favorite subjects AND her best ones,too.

Why this fuss about PE and no mention of music and arts?

/rant over, thanks for reading
:
 

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I think art and music are very important.
if you put aside the fact that they are probley some of the funnest classes, be it elementary school, middle or highschool...
I think that feeding creativity in children is so under-rated... and it sucks.
I think you should ask them if they have an art program, and if not, I'd (try) and find one locally....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by mommaToThree
I think art and music are very important.
if you put aside the fact that they are probley some of the funnest classes, be it elementary school, middle or highschool...
I think that feeding creativity in children is so under-rated... and it sucks.
I think you should ask them if they have an art program, and if not, I'd (try) and find one locally....
No, they do have arts and music but it seems totally unimportant what grades you get in those subjects, as if it doesn't matter anyway because they're just filler classes or soemthing....
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by huggerwocky
No, they do have arts and music but it seems totally unimportant what grades you get in those subjects, as if it doesn't matter anyway because they're just filler classes or soemthing....
Oh, I know it. I was always really passionate about music at school, but getting an "A" in band was always considered a second-rate accomplishment... even auditioning and getting into the All-State band was seen as being a waste of time.

And elementary-school music seems to be the class that gets cut when there's an assembly, a pompous announcement from the principal, whatever.

Meh. I guess the "obesity crisis" is getting schools fired up about P.E, but what about the "artistic crisis"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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Originally Posted by eightyferrettoes

Meh. I guess the "obesity crisis" is getting schools fired up about P.E, but what about the "artistic crisis"?

I don't know, I just thought you'd at least give it a mention. Studying towards test is not what makes a good student ( but that's another story
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Yes, arts are very important in schools. We're all talented in different things. Some of us are athletic, some of us are great at math, some of us are awesome writers, and some of us rock the stage. How will kids learn what they're good at, if they're not challenged in every area? I think it's so sad that some schools put so little emphasis on the arts, and consider them "fluff" classes. My elementary school music teacher was actually fired for being too strict. I guess the rest of the faculty figured he should be giving all of the kids A's just for participating. I'm glad he was the way that he was, and felt so bad for him after he was fired. It happened long after I had graduated from that school, and long after I had gone back to co-op for his classes for a highschool credit. He pushed the students to their limits, instead of just grinning and bearing the off-key compositions. He yelled at us when we goofed around and shot our spit valves at eachother, and readily handed out D's and F's to the students who earned them. But he was also there for an hour every night after school, to help any students who wanted it.

It wasn't long after he was fired, that they got rid of the music program all together. That really bummed me out when I heard about it. Luckily, a year or two ago, the school realized the mistake they made, and brought the program back. They noticed a big difference in the students concentration and learning abilities in other classes, after music was gone. I'm sure that wasn't the only reason they brought it back. I know that many parents complained. But I'm glad that they came to their senses.

As a side note, I learned so much from drama class in highschool, and feel that it made me grow and mature the most, out of any other class I took. I don't remember much of math, don't recall the books I read or the essays I wrote, and jeez, don't even ask me to tell you what I learned in phys. ed. But if you ask me about what I learned in drama, I could fill a thousand pages.
 

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So many good replies to this post...

Being involved in music in high school saved me. Literally. My family growing up was a huge mess, and I was the middle child of six. I felt very lost at hime, and very lost in a suburban school with at least 900 kids in my graduating class.

I had a high school music teacher that took me under her wing so to speak, and became a mother, therapist, and teacher all wrapped up in one. She changed me. But being involved in music in school gave me a sense of pride, a place to belong, and a way to express myself and do something that seemed important. There's no way I could have ever gotten that out of a math class or a science lab.

I work as music teacher myself now, teaching private lessons. I don't know that I will ever have the impact on someone that this teacher did on me, but I love interacting with my students on a weekly basis, and sharing part of myself with them. I also work in music retail, and we work on projects constantly to advocate for music in the schools,

I think my ideal model of a school would be one based on Gardner's theories of multiple intelligences, where musical intellingence is as higly regarded as mathematical intelligence.
 

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It is unfortunate that the first classes to be eliminated from schools in a budget crisis are music and art. It says a lot about what our society values. Sports, Sports, Sports.

I believe music and art are so important to students. It irks me a bit that when I have parent-teacher conference the teacher goes over all the classroom stuff but has very little to say about PE and art. Those teachers fill out their section but there are no comments from them. Hmmm, maybe I will send a note off to the principal about it.
 

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Hi Anna!

In many schools, the arts and music have been cut from the curriculum because of lack of money and no time when all the emphasis is on academics. It is left up to the parents or the PTA to fill the hole. It is a sad situation. I grew up in So California in the time of major tax cuts and little school funding. I remember when the arts and music programs in my junior and high schools were drastically cut. It was very sad.

You might check with requirements, however, since sometimes they are supposed to be taught and are not. In WA state, the arts are supposed to be taught and art is a subject on the mandatory state achievement tests. Maybe your daughter's school-teacher is just "forgetting" the arts and music. It may be that the school has a very excited and energetic pe teacher who is pushing physical achievement as a priority. (I've worked with the like as a teacher.) It may also be that there is no one to teach the arts and music. Maybe volunteers could be brought in. My friend is an art docent at her son's school. The school has no money for arts education so the PTA bought materials and curriculum and parents volunteer to be an art docent for each class.

Now is a great time to organize the community so that this vital part of our humanity is not left out of our schools.

Good luck!

Kathy
 

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Kim: I went to Ramsey for five years as a kid. I don't know what it's like now, but when I was there it was a wonderful, wonderful program. The music teachers especially worked really hard to motivate all their students regardless of whether they came from homes where the value of what they were doing was recognized. The real problem was that after we left Ramsey, the high schools in the area were not at all set up to let us continue with music at the same level that we were used to -- we went from playing complex classical and baroque pieces in full orchestra to plucking along with the marching band in high school.
Hopefully, that's changed in the last ten years, since we were the second graduating class from Ramsey.
 

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Quote:
The real problem was that after we left Ramsey, the high schools in the area were not at all set up to let us continue with music at the same level that we were used to -- we went from playing complex classical and baroque pieces in full orchestra to plucking along with the marching band in high school.
I am so sorry to hear that.


I've heard great things about Southwest High as a school, but don't know how it fares in regards to the arts. Thus the plug for Perpich Center for the Arts.

Side funny: My dh started playing violin at age 4. By junior high his violin lesson conflicted with the first 15 minutes of basketball practice. Of course the basketball coach sat him down and said, "Listen, you are going to have to make some tough decisions here...". (Insinuating that he was going to have to give up violin to commit to basketball.) Ugh. He told the coach that he didn't think he had a chance of making a living as a pro basketball player, and that violin was more important to him. (An amazing thing for an impressionable 12 year old!)
 

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No, they do have arts and music but it seems totally unimportant what grades you get in those subjects, as if it doesn't matter anyway because they're just filler classes or soemthing....
It may be a simple case of it's not a strong emphasis right now and that's why it wasn't mentioned. Not all subjects were mentioned at my dd's interview even though they are doing them. Science and social were 2 which were not mentioned, for the first bit of school there was not a strong emphasis on doing those 2 subject. They did them but they did more work on review, seeing where the kids were and introducing some other things. Next "term" it may be more social and science.
 

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The Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto has developed a program called Learning through the Arts. They teach math, science and history through music, theatre and visual arts. They have implemented the curriculum in many of the Toronto schools and it has been very successful. My son's school has it but he's only in SK so I haven't seen it in action yet. I'll be interested to see how it pans out because although I think this program would have helped me immensely I wonder if the more typical math geek like my Dad (the least visual person I know although very musical) would prefer the old way of teaching math - hopefully they adapt the curriculum to the student!

Here's a link with lesson plans:

http://www.ltta.ca/

Here's a blurb:

Learning Through the Arts (LTTA) is a dynamic, arts-driven education program providing teachers with creative tools to engage all students in math, science language arts and social studies.

It is now the largest full school intervention program in the world, reaching more than 100,000 children each year. Demand for LTTA continues to increase exponentially. We anticipate that, by 2005, there will be 500 LTTA schools in Canada, and teacher professional development centers in 10 countries.

With LTTA, the arts become tools for delivering general curriculum. LTTA students explore new ideas by
making images

creating dances

telling stories

singing songs

Learning Through the Arts offers a way forward for young people who have struggled to learn through traditional means such as books or lectures.

http://www.rcmusic.ca/ContentPage.as...earningThrough
 

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personally, the only way i would feel my children were receiving well-balanced education (other than homeschooling) is if they were enrolled in an arts-magnet setting. otherwise there is way too much emphasis on athletics.
This is the type of school my dd goes to and it's wonderful.

Speaking of P/T conferences, maybe the teacher doesn't say much if she actually does teach them that class. My dd has music and arts, but it's not her regular teacher so she really wouldn't have much to say unless the music or dance teacher would say something.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by huggerwocky
So we had teacher's conference and my husband went. Eveerything was all right, the teacher is nice he says and my daughter loves her. Theyw ent through the subjects and, ok.

Except: there was no mention of arts and music.

But: my third grader got a sheet where her thigh strength, arm strength, cardiovascular abilities were measured. As in" can do so many push ups, run so many laps" etc.

This seems so fundamentally wrong to me, and not only because they are her favorite subjects AND her best ones,too.

Why this fuss about PE and no mention of music and arts?

/rant over, thanks for reading
:
we had to do those tests all thru school, and in elementary we alternated art music and pe throught the week, but i dont remember exactly how


however the year after i graduated my high school got an entire fine arts COMPLEX built
new band hall, orchestra hall, choir rooms, theater, everything cuz our fine arts guys (all of those mentioned above, my lil sis included) were awesome, going to all kinds of contests and doing great

where as the foot ball team, who went to state my freshman year, never won more than 2 or 3 (if that) games a season fom my sophmore year thru when my sis graduated 2 years after me. they probably still suck
 

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huggerwocky said:
Why this fuss about PE and no mention of music and arts?
QUOTE]

The problem is that there has been such a rise in obesity among young people that there is a bigger emphasis on exercise. The arts and music are going the way of the Dodo bird in many schools due to financial crisis, but they are keeping the sports. I am glad to hear that your district at least still has art and music. It is sad however that the activities that make our DC well rounded and are proven to increase their IQ's happens to be the thing that gets cut out or de-emphasized.
 
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