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I don't know how else to put this...I am a WOHM to a 2.5 yo, have worked 32 hours/week since he was born. It can be hard sometimes, but it can be great too - as I am sure you all know. I have a college education, and I do fundraising, and have for nearly 10 years since I graduated college.<br><br>
With #2 on the way, I am starting to re-think my strategy. I need to work, to support our family right now. It is not a matter of scaling down our lifestyle, which is not extravagant, but a matter of fact that I must work. However, I day care is almost exactly 25% of my take home pay. With 2, this will be 50% plus. I am wondering if I should take another look at my career.<br><br>
Would it be better post-maternity leave to look for a retail job or something in the evenings? Maybe that would be too hard with 2 children...I have no clue. Since college, I've never done anything except for professional office-y jobs (which I like!) but there's no reason to assume that that's the only way, right?<br><br>
Anybody else taking a different path?
 

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i would love to do something different, but it would be sooooo hard to find that something with the same level of compensation that i currently receive, especially around here. i would go batty staying at home with ds and not having some time for my own growth. i'm also at a point in my career that moving jobs (within my field) only means moving upwards into more office-y positions and, likely, a more rigorous schedule. the beauty of my current position is that i can come and go somewhat freely. the downfall of my current position is that my boss oscillates wildly between being a micromanager and being absent, and doesn't generally give any real supervision.<br><br>
sorry, no advice for you, just understanding.
 

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I am in my field, but would be completely open to doing something that would allow me to be with DS more. Of course, it would have to be something I like to do, which pretty much leaves me with my current job/field and/or working as a barista (my other all-time favorite job....)
 

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I am working in my field and I love it, but we have a bit of different circumstance because DH is a SAHD. Before being a SAHD he didn't really have a "field" he just worked in the job that felt right for him at that time, which varied from retail management to hotel/hospitality. He always had good jobs in that he liked them and they paid decently, but was never on a career track and had few benefits. Luckily in my field I make great benefits and just enough money for us all to get by on. Without the insurance benefits I receive at my job, we would both have to work full time- and one of our salaries would be going to childcare and insurance. I would love to work part time and have more time with my kids especially since they are so young- but for us loosing the benefits would be the real blow. I feel lucky - it's actually not a bad deal for all of us- we have enough money for the things we need, we have good health care, the kids have a parent at home, I work in a job I enjoy, and DH likes being a SAHD. There is always a little part of me that wishes I had more time at home, though.
 

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I had always wanted to be a nurse, but real life got in the way, and it wasnt until 1995 that I became licensed.<br><br>
At the time, I had two kids who were 5 & 8 when I passed boards. But before that I was working in a bank, as a teller first, then new accounts. Fun, but as my kids got older, i wanted to be with them more, and my work did not allow for ballet, soccer or baseball, all things my kids wanted to do (my husbands work schedule is rigid and inflexible). So one day, when the feds came in and shut us down and took over the bank, I quit that monday. And immediately enrolled in nursing school.<br><br>
I have never regretted it for two reasons. 1, I make in two days what I made in a whole week at the bank, fulltime. 2, the flexiblilty I have in unreal. I am home 5 days a week, have great benefits, and my kids do soccer, karate, basketball, you name it.<br><br>
For me the answer was to leave the business world and enter my kids world more fully.<br><br>
Ironically, in the ER, I now care for other mamas critically ill and injured children, as 43% of all of our ER patients are kids.<br><br>
Life is good!
 

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I don't know what my field is exactly. I'm more of a renaissance woman. But I can tell you that I recently decided that I want to move into real estate. I want to own several rental properties and gradually replace my day job income with rental income. Before, I was working on the side as a life coach and it was too hard to find clients when also working FT.<br><br>
At one pt, I had 6 coaching clients in addition to my FT job AND being pregnant. I let all the clients go bit by bit because I knew I'd want to spend more time with my new baby.<br><br>
If I had unlimited money, perhaps I could put the time into building a coaching/consulting business...however, I decided I don't want my energy to go into that anymore. Hence, the real estate. People always need somewhere to live -- whereas coaching is something people only do when they have the money for it, if then -- so it won't be as hard to find "clients."
 

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Working in my field is the only way we could have the money to have children, so I don't think I can back away from it at all... on the other hand, because what I do requires a degree (Law) and specialized knowlege (health care administration), I can downsize a certian amount and still stay in my field while working less hours but continuing to make the same wage as a skilled worker. Perhaps that would be an option for you?<br><br>
I would worry about taking a retail job, just because of the uncertianty of it -- hours changing, bad bosses, and the way you get treated when you're just a replacable part in a machine rather than a valued member of the orginization might be a big shock to you and undo whatever family-friendlyness you get from working less hours.
 

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I work in my field, but as an attorney, the options are REALLY wide-open to working from home (in the future) flex time, etc.<br><br>
I think the key is picking a field with this flexibility. Also working in an office-y job with a smaller company might give you more flexibility. You could always just post your resume on a site like monster.com or something to see how many hits you get.
 

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I work in a school so I can spend more time with my DS...Police work is too scarey for me since I have a child....
 

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I am in my field. I took a year mat leave (canada) after I went back I only returned 21 hrs a week. I am incredibly lucky to have the opportunity to cut my hours. If I took anything outside my field I would have to work many more hours to make the same pay. I work in infant development field.
 

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Haven't really changed fields since having kids, but I did take a different kind of position. Formerly my job required me to be on the road about 50% of the time. It was a job I really enjoyed and for the most part I didn't mind the travel. However once my DD was born my perspective really changed and it was much harder than I thought it would be (logistically and emotionally) to be away from her. So after a year of that I looked for a job where my hours were more stable and I wasn't required to do as much overnight travel. For the most part I have not looked back and the sacrifice was worth it. I only occassionally miss the pace and challenge of my old job.
 

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I don't think a retail job would be a good change--the pay is not very good, unless you went into management, in which case you'd be working daytime hours. Sort of defeats the purpose!<br><br>
What about freelancing? I don't know exactly what kind of fundraising you do, but you could try grantwriting, which you could do at any hour of the day or night. Or you could perhaps do consulting work for nonprofits--help them develop general fundraising strategies (e.g. five-year development plan), and perhaps implement them.
 

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After I had my first child, I worked out of my area (mamas and babies) and worked evenings (urgent care) so that I could be home with my children and they could be with dh in the evening. It was the best of both worlds, home with my babes all day till the youngest was 2, and still earning income.<br>
I'm now working days, in my field, and my babies are in preschool and first grade and we're all home together in the evenings.<br>
I agree that retail doesn't always pay well, supermarkets usually have evening shifts and I hear they pay pretty decent.<br>
Good luck to you mama, follow your heart and your instincts on this.
 

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I worked pt from home in my pre-baby position for two years after having ds1. When he was 2 I took a promotion and worked ft from home for 1.5 years. After ds2 was born I took a 6 month maternity leave and then was back at work 1 day a week from home for a few months before "leaving" (ie. being part of a huge layoff)<br><br>
Since being laid off I have done a TON of freelance --- on a good month I make much more than what I would in a ft mid-level professional position after paying for child care (course there are also months where I make very little) I also teach gymnastics 2-4 hours a week at $14.50 per hour (plus the benefit of free parks & rec activities for myself and the kids)<br><br>
Anyway, all this is to say that freelance work is great if you can find it, and that there are really lots of options for quilting together a work schedule that meets YOUR needs for income and personal growth.<br><br>
Good luck and congrats on your new baby!<br>
BJ<br>
Barney & Ben
 

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I think my job is more convenience. Although I have been here for a long time before I had my child, I don't think I would leave b/c my place of employement is right beside the school and I am in HR as a recruiter so I can schedule things around my dd's schedule if need be. It's nice that I can just walk down there and have lunch if I choose, or if I forget to put money in her lunch account I can just walk down there. Flexibility is so important to me right now, especially since my dd is in Kindergarten. Since I've been w/my job for so long I can retire in 12 years and be young enough to do a career change, and I'm thinking along the lines of teaching.
 

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Since you've worked in fundraising for so long, and development folks are always in demand (in my experience), why don't you try doing some freelance?<br><br>
I've been a freelance grantwriter for about 5 years (okay, I haven't worked a day since my twins were born, but I plan to return to freelance soon . . .). It's flexible, pays well, you still get to have contact with adults. And, you can often still work in their offices and not from home (which I think would be too distracting for me now that I have kids).<br><br>
Also, in terms of daycare for two kids, at least in my area, it's been less expensive to have them at home with a sitter than to take them somewhere. Plus, I know that they are getting great attention that way, since I lucked out in finding a total angel of a woman to care for them.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>NikiJeanne</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">day care is almost exactly 25% of my take home pay. With 2, this will be 50% plus. I am wondering if I should take another look at my career.</div>
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If daycare is going to be more than 50% of take home, maybe a second look at your finances could reveal several areas where money would be significantly saved if you were a SAHM instead of working. For instance, if you took care of the kids, didn't have to pay for monthly drycleaning, a cell phone, haircuts for the kids (you could do it yourself), a daily trip to starbucks, gas/travel to and from work, work clothes, and used your time at home to frugally prepare meals etc, rather than forgo as much frugality as might be possible for the sake of convenience when you are working...the list goes on. I know several people who determined they would actually save money if one of the parents stayed home rather than worked. It may be worth a look. I wish I were in such a position...
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I know several people who determined they would actually save money if one of the parents stayed home rather than worked. It may be worth a look. I wish I were in such a position...</td>
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If you do this, just be sure that you figure out all the costs of staying home--on your career, on your retirement, benefits, etc. I know women who have failed to take this part of the equation into account and just looked at their take home. Some were in for a very unpleasant surprise when they wanted to get back into the job market.<br><br>
I still work in the same field, but for a different type of employer (academic v. corporate). I have more flexibility and more job security, and it's worked out pretty well.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:<br><br>
Also, I think it's important to say that it's OK to decide that even if you make very little after everything comes out of your salary that you still chose to work because you want to. It's a strange sort of calculus that takes all the expenses of child care out of one person's salary, you know? Then again, it's totally OK to decide you want to stay at home as well, if that's an option for you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
(Plus, I don't know a single WOHM who manages a daily trip to Starbucks. I can only wish that was in our budget -- and that I had the time for it!)
 

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i'm new here an i am confused by all the acromyns the ladies are using... dh, ds. dd. sahm... could someone help me out... and hip me to these and other common abbreviations i might come accross on this site. i need some motheringdotcom culture 101! thank you
 
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