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I was trying to share an article with my DP - <a href="http://www.seanet.com/~alexs/ascorbate/199x/hattersley-jg-j_orthomol_med-1993-v8-n4-p229.htm" target="_blank">http://www.seanet.com/~alexs/ascorba...v8-n4-p229.htm</a> - about how SIDs may be a vitamin deficiency, specifically Sodium Ascorbate.<br><br>
Before I had even finished, he interrupted me and said that no one could have a SA deficiency, that we make it ourselves. So I was dumbfounded and just responded "We make our own Vitamin C?" This of course led him off on another tangent about how SA is NOT Vitamin C, but he couldn't explain to me what Vitamin C was and why SA is commonly called Vitamin C. EVERYTIME I talk to him about SA he almost literally explodes on me about how I'm wrong, like I kicked a puppy or something. I'm pretty tired of having to curb all SA conversations so that he wont unleash his personal vendetta against me about it.<br><br>
A pretty thorough search of the Internet could answer whether SA is different than Vitamin C or not. Some sources say that SA is one of many ascorbates that make up Vitamin C, and other sources say it is Vitamin C.<br><br>
I also could not find whether we make our own SA or if it must come from outside sources. The above mentioned article says that humans, guinea pigs and a few other mammals do not.<br><br>
Can anyone help me with these questions, one way or another? Some sources would be great if you have them. TIA!
 

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I would make HIM look for sources that say humans can make sodium ascorbate.<br><br>
My guess is that he's getting SA mixed up with something else he once read about.<br><br>
Quite honestly, I'd be more concerned with the way he's treating you than the actual subject of your arguments. Why is he so concerned with being "right." Why won't he let you finish your sentences at least? Would he at least READ the article you wanted to share with him?
 

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Humans are among the few animals that do not produce ascorbic <b>acid</b> in their livers. The guinea pig is another one.<br><br>
Here is the relevant section from Irwin Stone's book, The Healing Factor Vitamin C Against Disease, which explains his theory:<br><br><a href="http://vitamincfoundation.org/stone/chap1-11.htm" target="_blank">http://vitamincfoundation.org/stone/chap1-11.htm</a><br><br>
SA is ascorbic acid with sodium added. From Dr Tom Levy:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Sodium ascorbate is probably the best and certainly the least expensive of the mineral ascorbates for regular supplementation at relatively high doses (six grams or more daily). Many doctors and patients fear the regular dosing of sodium, however, due to the long-standing medical admonition to minimize sodium intake, especially for hypertension and cardiac failure patients. Indeed, sodium chloride (table salt) has long been known to facilitate fluid retention (increased plasma volume), a state that directly aggravates hypertension and heart failure. However, it appears that only sodium really results in significant fluid retention when administered with the chloride anion. Sodium when given with the anions citrate, ascorbate, or bicarbonate does not appear to adversely affect hypertension or to increase blood volume. Because of these findings, it has been directly suggested that the concept of "sodium-dependent" hypertension should be changed to "sodium chloride-dependent" hypertension (Kurtz and Morris, 1983; Kurtz et al., 1987). Anecdotally, I have never found multi-gram doses of sodium ascorbate to adversely affect blood pressure or blood volume status. However, since there always appear to be exceptions to every rule in biology, anyone who notices elevated blood pressures or ankle edema after high doses of sodium ascorbate would probably be well-advised to supplement with a different form of vitamin C.</td>
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