Mothering Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
this exact quiz was part of my journey. The first was the much less inclusive Wired quiz http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/aqtest.html...
After taking that I kind of jokingly said "weird, what if I am autistic and never even knew it"

when I took the test you linked I said:

Quote:
Your Aspie score: 179 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 32 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

Do you eat the same food and wear the same clothes every day?
*guilty*

I know this is going to sound very... aspergers of me to scrutinize the test, but I don't particularly feel like the test was very complete I feel like my score was artificially inflated by coincidence.
ok I will stop talking now.
With perspective, and connection of some very weird childhood memories, and my mom's flat out refusal to tell me what all of the tests, therapy, etc was for when I was little, I have come to accept that it was always pretty obvious that I am an Aspie. Looking at the DSM-IV criteria... I do not need an aspie quiz, because I can easily qualify when honestly applying those criteria to myself.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
Do you wish you would've been told? Would it have made a difference? .....maybe hard to tell/guess after the fact huh?
Nobody likes being lied to or underestimated, it hurts, a lot. Secrets are about shame, truth is about power.

Quote:

Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
....seems a bit odd to go through all the therapy w/out ever knowing what for.
I was mostly in special classes, and psychotherapy, it was the early 80s, and to my knowledge there wasn't the same level of EI and other therapies available. It really sucked never knowing why I was being tested, why my class was different, why I was different.

Quote:

Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
OTOH.....maybe they didn't want it to be an *excuse* (on your part, or teachers, or whatever) that would keep you from realizing your full potential.
I honestly think my parents were just scared of the big bad Autisticooties, to be perfectly frank, and prideful, I have a high IQ, and my parents treated me as if I was wasting a gift, rather than using an excuse.

Quote:

Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
ETA: ....and do you think the therapies were useful at all ? Or did you have to figure it all out on your own anyway? (and if not useful......just useless or more harm than good?)
Sign language was useful, psychotherapy was the biggest waste of time ever, idiots telling me I was severely depressed because I did not seek out other people, because socialization was not high on my priority list.

It took me a VERY long time, a lot of heart ache, and a lot of help from some really good personal relationships to get to where I am today, maybe if I had figured out early on a way to chew-stim in a socially acceptable way, or maybe if I had learned to self medicate myself with caffeine earlier, or maybe if I had learned that I need to drown out distractions, and think of many things at once before the clarity singular concentration can happen, it would have been easier, maybe if I had listened to music before age 13 I would have learned that I can invent, concentrate, and be productive much easier in the presence of music...

I can't really know that, I can share my hard won tricks with my kids, I can try to be honest and mindful of their sensory, intellectual, and emotional needs, as well as their physical ones, I can provide my parents with working rules to help them interact with my kids in a way they never could with me. I can listen and I can learn, I can know my kids and acknowledge their strengths, and help them overcome their weaknesses. That is what it means to be human though, humanity stands out in its ability to learn things collectively that cannot be learned in a single life time. My son has the head start I never had, and his son will have even more, just like I got more than my dad ever dreamed.

oops, sorry for the manifesto
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
Do autistic kids "turn into" aspie adults as they grow up, learn to talk, & learn some social rules?? (Does that ? even make sense?)
Many people are confused about speech delay and Asperger's because of some overly publicized generalizations... the DSM-IV states:

Quote:
DSM-IV:
There is no clinically significant general delay in language (e.g., single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years).
in other words, many kids that are considered to have profound speech delay, actually have "no clinically significant" delay.
This is why the youngest you can possibly get an Asperger's dx is age 3, this is one of the reasons PDD-WTF is so common, because if you do not meed criteria for Classic Autism, but you are not old enough to be dx Asperger, you will default to the "I dunno" diagnosis.

Also, with regard to Autistics "turning in to Aspies" when they grow up... Autism is still largely considered a childhood developmental disorder, Asperger's has a bit better PR, so it is the natural course of events. Since there is a spectrum, and the spectrum is measured largely by skill level, it only makes sense that one would be able progress, the traits that do not have to do with skill level, should not be considered "lower" or "higher", but the fact remains that many people think of/define aspergers as a "higher functioning" autism, and I would expect most people are "higher functioning" as they mature.

Quote:

Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
....How does the caffeine help?
Caffeine works for me like a mild ADD medication, with better-known side-effects. It speeds up my heart rate, and helps me focus.
Before I discovered caffeine, I discovered that I could do my math homework significantly faster if I had to pee, so I would chug water and intentionally hold it in so that I could blast through my math work. I know now the science behind what I was doing. Men particularly, have higher blood pressure and pulse when their bladder is full. Effectively speeding your whole body up.

Quote:

Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
What about the chewing thing? Do you mean ...you wish you'd learned to chew gum or something instead of hand flapping or similiar? Is that even possible?? Can you teach a child that without making them feel bad? (seems to be the debate for / against ABA, right?) We've been pretty successful w/ the vibrating teether or ice, to keep DS from biting his cheeks - that's a new habit though anyway, so ...? Haven't been doing that so much with the intention of teaching him something though, as to keep him from, well, biting his cheeks (he bit enough to bleed the other day; and I don't want that to continue or become a real habit)
The chewing and sign language thing are inter-related I have motor problems with my mouth if I do not properly stimulate and exercise it, if I do not, I tend to slur, studder, stammor, and trip over words. When I was little, I was punnished and shamed for chewing on my shirts, it worked to break me of the habit, but it greatly stifled my physical ability to speak, even though I had plenty of mental capacity for it. I was self conscious about it, so I stopped talking unless absolutly necessary, 3rd grade sign language afforded me a more comfortable means to make my needs known.

Later in life, I unconsciously discovered that if I constantly ate chewey candy, I could flirt and talk and articulate... I got a job at a candy store, and constantly carried gummi candy with me all throughout high school. I switched to Mentos in college, still I am famous for having insane amounts of candy all the time... nowadays I chew "Trident White" before every business meeting, the candy has done havoc on my teeth, but I would not be where I am today without it.

I would not try to stop a stim or substitute one, I would try of offer a more effective means of accomplishing the stim. "If you like chewing shirts, wait till you discover the accompanying shock of a pepermint blast from chewing gum." Rather than "Here lets hide your shame, no shirt chewing allowed, only gum." It is a difference in attitude, focusing on helping the person deal with themselves, rather than focusing on dealing with how other people see them. Many "make em look normal" therapies fail miserably because of the simple fact that many Autistic people REALLY DON'T CARE how other people see them.

Quote:

Originally Posted by azmomtoone View Post
and feel free to write a book ....or whatever. ANYONE here. Looking for as much info as I can get my hands on....
I am working on it, but it is currently back burner to my NanoWriMo novel.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top