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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a group of moms here dealing with their child's asthma issues? I would like to talk to NFL families about this and throw some ideas back and forth. I'm very interested in starting a discussion.
 

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I don't know that we're quite to the "childhood" place yet but my 18mos old has asthma as a result of her premature birth and extremely bad lungs. She was trached and on a ventilator until 11mos old and now we have asthma. She's on albuterol every 4hrs and pulmicort 2x a day and so far that in addition to avoiding triggers seems to keep things pretty under control.
 

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My 3 1/2 yo has asthma. His is very well controlled: he has had a pulmonologist since 3 mos and has been well medicated on pulmicort and closely followed.<br><br>
Fiona
 

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My 2yo DS has just been diagnosed with "probable" asthma due to dust mite allergies and he is now on Singulair for it because he was coughing all night long. The Singulair seems to be helping but it's been only 2 days. I am hoping he will not need permanent meds but we decided to use it for now until we can take steps to reduce the dust mite population in the house.
 

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Add me in as well! I have two boys who have struggled with asthma. At this point it is under control after making lots of changes!
 

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What ideas? I'm interested!<br>
I wonder about the relationship between undiagnosed reflux and asthma for instance.<br>
I've got a 3.5 year old with asthma and allergies. Asthma is so hard because it can kill--so terrifiying to see your child not be able to get a breath.<br>
However, I think digestive enzymes have helped us avoid more allergies (or hope) and we do probiotics and cod liver oil too. Chiropractic, cranial sacral, and reflexology weren't helpful for him in terms of his asthma.<br>
His allergies make herbal treatments difficult.<br>
He's on singulair (I know not natural) which has helped a great deal and with it we've avoided the steroids. <a href="http://www.pslgroup.com/dg/eb19e.htm" target="_blank">http://www.pslgroup.com/dg/eb19e.htm</a> I found this article which says that singulair is as effective as steroids.<br>
His crazy allergist told us to wean off the singulair because it was not helpful. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: Well, he ended up with attacks so bad we were using his allbuterol (sp?) multiple times a day. We're back on singulair and only use allbuterol as needed. We use it not even once a month on singulair. So the singulair really helps with asthma for us but I know it isn't natural. He's on zyrtec too for chronic hives--I hate that one but hives are terrible and eliminating all his allergens didn't get rid of them.
 

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I'd be interested in a thread here as my daughter was just diagnosed this past winter with asthma. Every fall/winter since she was born she's ended up in the ER numerous times with respiratory issues - it all started at 3 months when she had RSV. The doc said that the BFing was probably the only thing that kept her out of the hospital that time.<br><br>
She was fine over the summer with no medication but as soon as school started bam she had an upper respiratory infection that turned into a nasty cough.
 

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My 3 1/2 year old has asthma too. He is fairly well controlled until Winter and cold/flu season. He takes advair twice a day and singulair at night. He also has food allergies and eczema. It is such a huge stress and issue in his life. The food allergies keep him out of preschool and group care settings.
 

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Dd has asthma as well. She's on singulair and flovent, with combivent as needed. She also needs steroid doses usually a few times in the fall/winter to get things under control. Her only real trigger for airway issues is any type of respiratory infection, even simple colds.
 

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There is an asthma tribe in Health and Healing. You may have to dig for it.<br><br>
My dd has asthma and so do I, however we are not very NP at all about treating it. I am allergic to some of the stuff I tried in the past. My biggest strategy (ideally) is to keep in shape and keep my lungs strong. Dd and I both take Singulair and Flovent during high allergy season. Also Claritin OTC during the worst days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Okay my son was just diagnosed with Asthma this month. He'll be five on November 2nd. However I know looking back that he has had asthma for all his life. I carry a lot of anger towards doctors right now for their stupidity. They kept prescribing antiobiotics to him whenever I'd bring him in! Research now tells me that those make asthma worse. *sigh* We can't go back in time though.<br><br>
They now have him on Flovent two puffs a day, singulair chewable, zyrtec chewable, and the albuterol as needed.<br><br>
I do have some concerns about the Flovent because it is an inhaled steroid. They keep telling me the side effects are nothing at such a small dose but it does still concern me.<br><br>
The singulair gave him weird dreams at first but now he seems to be used to it.<br><br>
I have been trying to research about more natural ways to deal with the allergies. I know that his allergies is the biggest issue that causes the irritation for him. He has that "allergic salute" and he often gets the shiners under his eyes from allergies.<br><br>
My house gets moisture in the cellar and there is very little that I can do about that. I know there is mold down there. I suspect this is our biggest problem. As a single mom in college there is little monetarily that I can do about that though other than clean the walls down there with bleach.<br><br>
We have three pets a dog, a cat, and a ferret. We LOVE our animals and life would not be the same without them, but I am feeling the pressure to do something on that front. Not sure what. Do I really have to take away his beloved pets? I think allergy testing should be our first step on that. I want some kind of "proof" that he is allergic to THEM in particular.<br><br>
We do sodium ascorbate and CLO as a nutritional supplement. He's small for his age too so I push a lot of coconut oil and healthy fats. I'm up for any other suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sbgrace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9035734"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What ideas? I'm interested!<br>
I wonder about the relationship between undiagnosed reflux and asthma for instance.<br>
I've got a 3.5 year old with asthma and allergies. Asthma is so hard because it can kill--so terrifiying to see your child not be able to get a breath.<br>
However, I think digestive enzymes have helped us avoid more allergies (or hope) and we do probiotics and cod liver oil too. Chiropractic, cranial sacral, and reflexology weren't helpful for him in terms of his asthma.<br>
His allergies make herbal treatments difficult.<br>
He's on singulair (I know not natural) which has helped a great deal and with it we've avoided the steroids. <a href="http://www.pslgroup.com/dg/eb19e.htm" target="_blank">http://www.pslgroup.com/dg/eb19e.htm</a> I found this article which says that singulair is as effective as steroids.<br>
His crazy allergist told us to wean off the singulair because it was not helpful. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: Well, he ended up with attacks so bad we were using his allbuterol (sp?) multiple times a day. We're back on singulair and only use allbuterol as needed. We use it not even once a month on singulair. So the singulair really helps with asthma for us but I know it isn't natural. He's on zyrtec too for chronic hives--I hate that one but hives are terrible and eliminating all his allergens didn't get rid of them.</div>
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</tr></table></div>
It sounds like you and I are in a similar boat here with the severe allergies and asthma combination. We were prescribed the same meds too. I am usually so anti-medication also that its really hard to submit to them but after seeing my son suffer without them it gives me that incentive. I'm sure you feel the same way.<br><br>
I have been trying to research about alternative therapies for allergies and have uncovered something called NAET however I'm very skeptical about it. It seems kind of weird and incredibly pricey to me. However, many do swear by it. You might want to read about it and see what you think.
 

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I would love to join.<br><br>
DD, 3.5, has been diagnosed with cough-variant asthma, reflux, allergies, and chronic sinusitis. She is currently taking Singulair, Advair, Rhinocort, Prevacid, and Zyrtec. Whew. We are actually considering dropping the Singulair because we have not seen results from it. She has also had a lot of antibiotics--ugh--, which have been surprisingly effective, probably because of the sinusitis. She also takes probiotics and lots of extra C. We did cod liver oil for a while but I didn't notice any changes.<br><br>
For us, almost anything I can do to keep her out of the place where she literally coughs every 10 seconds 24/7 and has to go on oral steroids is worth it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I hate giving her all the meds, though, and we believe they affect her behavior. She is not the same kid she was before all of this.<br><br>
It's been a strange journey for us because DD was very healthy until about 2.5, when she entered daycare, and things spiralled badly all of sudden.<br><br>
Some things to share: we had no idea she had reflux. It was diagnosed via pH probe testing. She shows only very subtle symptoms.<br><br>
Treating her nasal symptoms has made a huuuuge difference in the coughing. We just saw an ENT and are supposed to start twice daily sinus rinsing with NeilMed (this is OTC and not a drug--just a sinus flush). I have high hopes for this.<br><br>
The worst part (apart from the stress and worrying--DD has also been tested for immune system disorders and cystic fibrosis, neither of which she has, thank goodness) is that we have now had two specialists tell us to pull her from all group care or activities (no more than 6 kids) till she is 5. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">: <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">: We haven't followed this advice yet.
 

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Ava was on oral steroids a few times this past winter and they most definitely affected her behavior - regression developmentally and more aggressive. She is on pulmicort .5 1x day now then we'll up it to 2x day as it cools off. We add Albuterol and Atrovent as needed (which is usually daily in the winter). All of this is svn, we have an asthma action plan now.
 

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The oral steroids are completely horrendous for DD--I want to run away from home when she's on them--but she's only been on them 3x, thank goodness. It's the fact that her daily meds also seem to affect her behavior that really gets me down. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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I'm in! (What a group, none of us want to be in it!)<br>
My eldest has allergy based asthma, diagnosed at age 4, and like a pp noted, she had been having attacks all her life. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:<br>
She is on Singulair, which has really helped, to the point that when she was ready for the higher dose (5 mg rather than 4 mg) she was struggling, and when we increased the dose, she really improved. She has always been off the charts for ht/wt, and since Singulair doses are based on age <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: rather than weight (like medication should be!!) she needed the increase early.<br>
She is also on Flovent, after being able to switch to an inhaler, after years of being on Pulmicort. We use albuterol rarely, usually due to a cold or resp. infection. For spring and fall allergies, she is on Nasonex, which helps tremendously. She is pretty well controlled, I guess.<br>
I have been unable to find natural methods that have helped, except for swimming. We do swimming lessons, and on the nights she has class, her peak flow numbers are phenomenal! Something about it really helps, so we are sticking with it. (Be aware, though, that in some children the chlorine can trigger attacks.)<br>
cortsmommy, do you have a dehumidifier in your cellar? That might help - ours makes a big difference in our indoor air quality. My dd also has a room-size HEPA filter in her bedroom, which has helped too. I hear you on the pet thing - we had cats before she was born, and I was always like, well, if it was the cats, she would always be having trouble, right? So when we got her allergy testing, sure enough, cats were a problem. So we found a home for the cats, and her asthma has been so drastically better that even I cannot deny it. (My kitties...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/mecry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="crying"> ) The school year before we gave away our cats, she had to go on prednisone tablets everytime she got a cold. She has not had a single one since they left.<br>
So I highly recommend allergy testing...because she is allergic to cats, hamsters, rabbits...but not dogs or horses. Sadly, my DH is severely allergic to dogs, so that puts the kibosh on that. It is all <b>his</b> fault!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br>
Also, I have done extensive research on steroid use. The kind that you hear all the warnings about is the higher doses, tablets, taken orally, longer term. When it is taken short-term, like a week or two, the tapering of the dose keeps the side-effects to a minimum. The inhaled ones are very low doses, and since it goes right to their lungs, very little is systemically absorbed. A long term study of Pulmicort shows that children under the age of 10 do show slightly delayed growth, but they do catch up with the control group after a few years. That has been my experience, also - my dd was always off the chart, but her height slowed down for about three years - but between 8/06 and 8/07, (age 8.5 to 9.5) she has grown three inches!! So I believe that she is catching that slowed growth back up. I encourage you to research it...what I found out helped me feel that it is better, risk/benefit-wise, IYKWIM.<br>
sbgrace, I agree, this is a terrible thing. When my dd finally got diagnosed, she had an attack that put her in the ER for 8 hours, then admitted overnight. After each treatment, she would sit up, have good color, then slowly sink down, getting paler and weaker...that went on, over and over, it was the hardest day of my life. That is why I have chosen steroids - I never want to see her like that again, ever.<br><br>
The good news, mamas, is that as they grow, and their lungs grow, it does get better. I know one boy who was tested for CF due to such severe asthma, who now in his twenties is doing great. Another boy, preemie birth, constantly in the ER for attacks, as a teen went years without ever using an inhaler. So it should get better!<br>
And of course, identifying their triggers is a huge help.<br><br>
Here is a site which really helped us...<br><a href="http://www.njc.org/disease-info/diseases/asthma/index.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.njc.org/disease-info/dise...hma/index.aspx</a><br>
They are the best in the country for asthma treatment and research. They also have a great tool called the "Asthma Wizard" to help kids understand and learn about it.<br><br>
Also, I wanted to add if your child doesn't use a peak flow meter, get one from your doc. It will let you track their asthma, and you can see trouble coming and do something about it. Our first doc, who took too long to dx, told us she couldn't use it at age 4. We switched, and the new doc said "Of course you should be using one!" It has been soooo helpful.
 

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Thanks Sharon for the information on the peak flow meter - I need to look it up. I told my husband I was going to buy a pulse oximeter for this season to save us trips to the ER. My daughter will have stridor but then end up with an o2 sat of 92-94 - so she looks and sounds horrible but really isn't as bad as she sounds. Does the peak flow meter do something similar?
 

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Hi all<br><br>
We definately belong here! I don't have much time to post right now as the babes are waking but I would really like to discuss experiences with the meds and behaviour. We are at our wits end with DS1.<br><br>
Will be back later.<br><br>
Martha
 

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The peak flow meter measures their lung function - it will show if the lung function is decreasing or if they are having more trouble even before they might show outward symptoms, so you can catch flares earlier before they become acute. I really wish we could use one, but DS1 is too developmentally delayed to understand how to use it and DS2 is too young yet - I hope we can get one for him in the future.<br><br>
My boys both have asthma - DS1 due to prematurity and chronic lung disease, DS2 is more reactive to allergies and respiratory infections. They both take daily pulmicort and albuterol with flares. DS1 also takes daily atrovent.
 

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Thanks Cathy - I read up on it and I think we'll have to wait a year or two before that will work with Ava because of her developmental delays as well. I was trying to get her to do the breath they described and she just smiled. LOL
 
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