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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am on the board of REACHE in WA State, (stands for Regional Association of Childbirth Educators) and we have a great conference coming up.<br><br>
"At Least You Have a Healthy Baby:" Exploring the Forces Behind the Cesarean Epidemic<br><br>
Richard Roberts MD, JD (author of AAFP response to ACOG's VBAC policy), Penny Simkin, Pam Udy (President of ICAN) and others will be speaking. Cesarean art done by women who have given birth by c/s. Lots of great stuff!<br><br><br>
The date is April 18th, all day right outside of Seattle. More info can be found at <a href="http://www.reache.info" target="_blank">www.reache.info</a>. This is great for doulas, birth educators, midwives, docs, and birth advocates. If you are in the area, please join us!<br><br>
Warmly,<br>
Sharon
 

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Bummer! I would love to go to a conference like this! but I'm across the states on the east coast and can't swing it.<br>
this IS one of the main issues/ problems behind the c/s epidemic. the mother's experience is trivialized and she is deemed selfish for any particular wishes she has for her birth! I DETEST this phrase and comment to everyone that I hear it from that the mother's experience SETS THE STAGE for the newborn experience, it IS important and it IS her right to her impressions of her birth. Noone should belittle her feelings.<br>
As you can tell, I feel strongly about it.<br>
Toward better birth,<br>
Melissa Youssi, CNM <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll">
 

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Wow- how many times have people said that to me? I would love to be in on the seminar but can in no way travel to Seattle. Is this coming to Denver or can it be set up to come? I got interested in homebirth/midwifery etc because midwives were the only ones who thought my sadness over my multiple c/s was valid and not ungrateful toward the way my healthy baby was born. Does the seminar travel or are there seminar tapes?
 

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It's interesting you're having Nancy O'Brien Abel speak, since one of the core messages of the fetal monitoring classes she teaches (aka, "Ways to Scare the Shit Out of New Labor Nurses") is that cesareans are generally much more legally defensible than vaginal birth with a questionable strip. I'd be interested to see what she had to say about the rate of c-section, particularly since she went from the UWMC (40% section rate) to Swedish, which no longer even does VBACs and has a section rate around 35-40% IIRC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, this is an old thread that has risen to the top, so I will let you know how it went.<br><br>
Richard Roberts was an excellent speaker, funny, intelligent and lots of good references! He was able to give the conference the big picture, asking us to take a step back and look at why we might be where we are, from a medical liability, professional practice stand point.<br><br>
Nancy spoke and had some audience questions that challenged some of her information, and some folks pushed back on some of her comments. For the record, Swedish First Hill does still do VBACs, but Swedish Ballard, their smaller campus to the north stopped doing them a couple years ago.<br><br>
Pam Udy, ICAN President spoke from the heart, in a very personal, heartwrenching, emotional presentation. This stirred a lot of stuff up for the attendees, and there was a lot of vocal discussion, and heated emotions during and after.<br><br>
Penny Simkin closed the day and was enjoyed by everybody.<br><br>
This was a definite emotion packed day, on a topic that is very near and dear to many. (as it should be)<br><br>
The art work provided was substantial and hard to look at, in some cases, as the grief and power and emotion was clear.<br><br>
REACHE is a Puget Sound area organization, our sole purpose is to put on one 8 hour conference in the spring. We are hard at work at the 2009 conference.<br><br>
There are not tapes or mp3 soundtracks available.<br><br>
If anyone wants more information, please PM me!<br><br>
Warmly,<br>
Sharon
 

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Swedish First Hill stopped doing VBACs last summer because they couldn't commit to having OBs in house 24/7.
 

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off topic (sort of) but how can a facility that delivers babies not commit to having OB's available 24/7? is it just that they are 15 minutes out or something? Because there are all kinds of scenarios where an emergency csection (or other OB assistance) could be necessary besides VBACs.<br><br>
At that point, isn't the hospital a glorified birth center and be advertising itself as such? That argument has always seemed so ridiculous to me because you're just a substandard facility if you don't have docs in house, not just ill equipped to deal with VBACs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Swedish Ballard stopped doing VBACs February of 2007. The OB group that practices there led this push.<br><br>
Swedish FH still does do VBACs and they always have in house OB's, almost 8000 births a year occur at that facility.<br><br>
And I totally agree with AmieV, pp, how can any facility that claims to be safe for birth, be ONLY safe for non-VBAC births? Don't emergencies occur with primips? This is an argument that angers me so much! If you can't do VBACS, then you can't do birth...any kind!<br><br>
Hey, I have an idea, maybe women should just decide to stay home!
 

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That's very strange, because we've been getting a lot of women who have been told First Hill no longer does VBAC, and that the issue was that there was no OB guaranteed to be in house 24 hours a day (since they're all private practice and most of the time are not in house for their labors until they come in to catch). If they're still doing VBAC, great -- but then they've got a hell of a PR issue, because they're telling women they're not.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AmieV</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12295873"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">off topic (sort of) but how can a facility that delivers babies not commit to having OB's available 24/7? is it just that they are 15 minutes out or something? Because there are all kinds of scenarios where an emergency csection (or other OB assistance) could be necessary besides VBACs.<br><br>
At that point, isn't the hospital a glorified birth center and be advertising itself as such? That argument has always seemed so ridiculous to me because you're just a substandard facility if you don't have docs in house, not just ill equipped to deal with VBACs.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
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Hospitals with private practice docs generally do not have them 24/7 in house. The expectation is usually that they will be there within 30 minutes ("decision to incision"). A lot of smaller hospitals don't have 24 hour anesthesia (they get called in from home). In practice, in a busy hospital, there will be someone there 24/7, but no one legally required to be unless the hospital contracts to have a hospitalist model.
 
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