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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!<br><br>
My dd will turn 13 months old on Thursday. I have not given her any water as a beverage yet. She has only had breastmilk and juice to drink. Now the juice is from concentrate meaning the company adds water to it, but I have never added water to it. She has also had water in her baby food - but not that I added it.<br>
She still nurses at least 5-8 times a day and gets a cup of juice once a day (not even everyday). Her urine is pale and I can tell she is well hydrated, but I am wondering if I should be giving her water. If anyone has any information they can send with links it would be much appreciated. I can't find any good info. on the web.<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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<a href="http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/baby-water.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/so...aby-water.html</a><br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/baby-juice.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/so...aby-juice.html</a>
 

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DS started sipping water from our cups when he was 6 months old. He never took a bottle, so I would give him sippy cups of water that he could sip when he wanted. He's been drinking water for a long time and I gave that to him long before he ever had juice to avoid the extra sugar. I know they don't need water if they are breastfeeding, but it's nice that he can quench his thirst otherwise throughout the day. (he still nurses a good 8 times per day, so it isn't interefering with that)
 

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I started giving him water at about 10 months. I gave him diluted juice awhile, but when I found out that juice is mainly just sugar, I decided to give him water as a drink when he needed hydration (summer or after heavy activity).<br><br>
He now eats whole fruits like crazy, and really doesn't like sweets very much. He's 2.75 and his beverage of choice is DEFINITELY water. he asks for it constantly and given a choice of Juice, milk or water, water wins out 90% of the time. I'm so glad.
 

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My DD started getting a sippy full of water at 9 months. She'd only take a tiny bit at first, but like solids at that point, it was just for practice anyway. Now I'm told by moms in playgroup that I am lucky that my 2 year old asks for water when other kids are drinking syrupy sweet juice and koolaid. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Juice mostly gives her runny poops and red-butt.
 

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UlrikeDG,<br><br>
Thank you for posting that link. I emailed it to my mother. She is *always* pushing water on newborns.
 

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DS started with a sippy of water at about a year old. He never had juice b/c of the sugar (DH baby teeth all had to be capped due to him drinking juice--so we've got genetic pre-disposition). He loves water--especially because he's never had juice so he's not expecting sweet stuff out of a cup!
 

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Now, when we talk about juice being too sugary and rotting kids' teeth, are we talking about that stuff that they call juice that is actually only 15% juice and 85% sugar-water, or are we talking about 100% juice?
 

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100% juice is sugar as well. It's just fruit sugar instead of cane sugar. It still feeds the germs that cause tooth decay and should still be avoided. Additionally, juice is mostly just empty calories, and children should only be given 4-6 oz per day (if any).
 

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Another non-juice giver here. Water seemed to be much healthier.<br><br>
There was a big scare about Alar when mine were small. Since I didn't give apple juice, we had no worries. We ate peeled apples and drank water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I gave her water in a sippy yesterday! She drank a few sips and acted like it that was not very good juice, but she did drink some. Then I diluted juice half/half with water, and she drank all of that. I want her to be a water lover like me. I was just afraid of introducing water too early.<br><br>
Thanks for your help. By the way I was not giving her juice all day long everyday. She started getting juice around 11 months and has had maybe 9 sippy's with 4-6 oz of juice since then and now she is 13 months. I used to be able to sit in the backseat of the car and nurse her while dh was driving. In her big kid carseat I can't physically do that so sometimes on long car rides I sit back there and I have a cup of juice available in case she gets thirtsty so we don't have to stop so much. Also a couple times when my mom watched her I let her have juice if she got thirsty.
 

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The AAP Policy Statement on <a href="http://www.aap.org/policy/re0047.html" target="_blank">The Use and Misuse of Fruit Juice in Pediatrics (RE0047)</a> is pretty good and definitely worth reading!<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><b>COMPOSITION OF FRUIT JUICE</b><br><br>
Water is the predominant component of fruit juice. Carbohydrates, including sucrose, fructose, glucose, and sorbitol, are the next most prevalent nutrient in juice. The carbohydrate concentration varies from 11 g/100 mL (0.44 kcal/mL) to more than 16 g/100 mL (0.64 kcal/mL). Human milk and standard infant formulas have a carbohydrate concentration of 7 g/100 mL.<br><br>
Juice contains a small amount of protein and minerals. Juices fortified with calcium have approximately the same calcium content as milk but lack other nutrients present in milk. Some juices have high contents of potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C. In addition, some juices and juice drinks are fortified with vitamin C. The vitamin C and flavonoids in juice may have beneficial long-term health effects, such as decreasing the risk of cancer and heart disease. Drinks that contain ascorbic acid consumed simultaneously with food can increase iron absorption by twofold. This may be important for children who consume diets with low iron bioavailability.<br><br>
Juice contains no fat or cholesterol, and unless the pulp is included, it contains no fiber. The fluoride concentration of juice and juice drinks varies. One study found fluoride ion concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 2.8 parts per million. The fluoride content of concentrated juice varies with the fluoride content of the water used to reconstitute the juice.<br><br>
Grapefruit juice contains substances that suppress a cytochrome P-450 enzyme in the small bowel wall. This results in altered absorption of some drugs, such as cisapride, calcium antagonists, and cyclosporin. Grapefruit juice should not be consumed when these drugs are used.<br><br>
Some manufacturers specifically produce juice for infants. These juices do not contain sulfites or added sugars and are more expensive than regular fruit juice....<br><br><b>RECOMMENDATIONS</b><br><br>
1. Juice should not be introduced into the diet of infants before 6 months of age.<br>
2. Infants should not be given juice from bottles or easily transportable covered cups that allow them to consume juice easily throughout the day. Infants should not be given juice at bedtime.<br>
3. Intake of fruit juice should be limited to 4 to 6 oz/d for children 1 to 6 years old. For children 7 to 18 years old, juice intake should be limited to 8 to 12 oz or 2 servings per day.<br>
4. Children should be encouraged to eat whole fruits to meet their recommended daily fruit intake...</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

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Thanks for the info Ulrite<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br>
Laura
 

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We give Konur a few ounces of juice in the morning with his raisons to help the iron in the raisons be absorbed easier, the Vit C in the juice does this. I have many friends who started on juice, dilited or not, and their kids will not drink water. I did not want that to happen. When he was younger, we only gave water at meals, he wanted to nurse during them, but that was a little painful! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> At 2 we started giving him enriched soymilk with lunch since he does not drink cow's milk. He is still nursing so that helps, too.
 
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