Mothering Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering at what point they are considered toddlers? DS is starting to "let go" and walk across the room...hasn't mastered it yet..but in the next week or so I'm sure he'll have it down! Are they toddlers at a certain age or when they start walking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,264 Posts
I think that's up to you, but for me, walking=toddling.

Of course, one-year-olds are *such* babies, still... I call mine toddlers but still think of them as mobile infants.

The big question is - when are they "preschoolers" ?

Since we don't do school anyway, I like to call them "littles" when they're 3-7 or so.

Or, "really littles" until 5, and then "littles." Hee.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply, I guess I'll be in the "Life With A Babe" forum for just a wee bit longer! No hurries!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,616 Posts
Hmm....I considered ds a toddler at 12 months. A babyish toddler though
He didn't walk until 14 months.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
972 Posts
I think they are officially toddlers at 12 months, regardless of what they are doing, so I started posting in toddlers at 12 months. However, at 14 months I began to see a change in who my DD was, and felt my DD had just entered toddlerhood. At 14 months she could walk and talk (and said her first sentence!) At 18 months I don't care what other people say-- they may have "babies" on their hands. But I've got a full-fledged toddler. That's not to say she isn't still new to this world, or doesn't have distinct baby features. She can still be very clingy if she doesn't want to be bothered with others. But she's very different than the child I had last year. She's weaned, potty trained and mostly in charge of her own pottying during the daytime hours, can run, kick and throw a ball very well, follow two part instructions, say her ABC's pretty well, count to 10 with mistakes, sing a number of songs, give attitude, ask for many of the things she wants and answer questions with "yes" or "no."......I'd say 14 months was when the toddler door opened, and 18 months was when DD made it clear that she had arrived in "Toddler Town!" LOL! But my experience doesn't seem to be typical around here, so take it for what it's worth.

Faith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,203 Posts
To me walking=toddler, but I guess if you have a late walker, they might really be toddlers when they still can't walk... I don't know. And my 7 mo. old is cruising and starting to stand unassisted, but I wouldn't consider him a toddler anytime soon even if he starts walking soon. He's just not there with everything else (he can only say dada and mama, can't sign at all, etc).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,791 Posts
For me, I started considering Erin a toddler when she was 12 months, since that is when she started walking. But I consider her a "young" toddler. It's just so hard to say because they grow and mature so quickly that there's really a huge difference between a 7mos old walker and 12mos old walker and a 16 mos old walker. Just cause they're walking doesn't mean they have mentally and emotionally developed quickly either, ya know?

So while I do call my DD a toddler I have to keep in mind that a lot of stuff I read about toddlers just doesn't pertain to me. I mean, a 2 year old is much more capable than my 15 mos old DD.

The same thing goes for the 7 mos old walker. Some things here in Life With a Babe still apply, obviously, but there there might be nuggets of useful info here in Toddlers, too. I still hang out at both places and read and applies the most to us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
I guess 12 months is the "official" beginning of toddlerhood. Both of my kids walked early (and talked late), so they didn't necessarily seem toddlerlike, even though they were toddling around. There was this change I began to feel, slowly, between 11-14 months or so. I guess that for me a big part of it is the blossoming of their urge to play games. Suddenly they loved to do what they "shouldn't" and then crack up, to turn things around and spoon feed me or put my shoes on. They found it hilarious when something was backwards, not the way it "should" be. They went through bouts of refusing to let me put their clothes on because they were bound and determined to do it themselves. It was no longer fun to quietly and gently explore the drawer: instead, they needed to unload its entire contents onto the floor and then dump them into a nearby wastebasket. Nursing became an athletic event. But again, these criteria may be influenced by the fact that my kids have been pretty gross motor oriented as babies. On the other hand, Eve (16 mo) was playing with another baby maybe a bit younger yesterday, who was not yet walking, and yet he still seemed like an early toddler. He would pick up the ball and throw it to Eve and laugh, then wait for her to return it. They were both very into picking stuff up and moving it. He also had quite the "spring" in his crawl, and his dad looked tired.


Btw, for those who are using talking as a criterion, I will note that Eve pretty much says nothing consistently. (Other than mama, dada, nana, and "da" for good-bye.) Yet she climbs the ladder (unassisted) and goes down the tall slide at the playground, she can dangle by her arms from a low bar and swing her legs, she turns sommersaults, runs quite fast, and she reliably holds on while being pushed on the "big kid" swings. She still seems like a baby as well as a toddler, to me, but definitely not an infant. Potty learning and weaning don't seem like useful criteria to me, either, since it is quite normal for an EC'ed infant to be dry all day and night, and for a non-EC'ed 3yo to prefer to use diapers, and for a 5yo to nurse every night before bed.
Kids are certainly all different.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top