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Does anyone know anything about auditory processing problems? My son has ADHD, well, that's what the diagnosis is for insurance purposes and he fits some things, but not others. His hearing was tested and found to be normal. So we have been just assuming that some of his behavior is just related to that. But then someone started asking me if I had him tested for auditory processing problems. He seems to hear the begining of things but not the last part. For example, I asked him to bring the stroller over to the car. He pushed it to the grass, I asked him again, and he pushed it to the porch. Finally, I had to get him to stop and look at me and ask him slowly and clearly to bring the stroller to the car. I am not sure if this is just an attention thing, that he is already moving before I finish what I am saying so misses the last part of what I am saying or if it is to do with processing. I have been noticing it a lot lately, he just seems to miss the last part of what I am saying. But if you really get his attention and make him stop and listen and repeat what you say, he seems to do alright. Does this sound like a processing problem, or just and attention problem. He is only 6, and they said they can't test for processing problems until he is seven.
 

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If i was still working as an OT I would say it would probably be 'label' as AP however now that im a mom and i have read many child development books (waldorf parenting) i believe especially at your sons age it may just be part of him developing ..does that make sense

michele
 

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My niece has some sort of auditory processing disorder. Like your son, she seems to listen to the beginning of instructions but not the whole thing - often she would complete only the first part of a two-part instruction. She has problems with spelling too, in that she rushes to sound things out and gets some letters wrong. She was diagnosed when she was about 7, I think. She has gone to some group therapy for it, I'm not exactly sure what it involved but I do remember that they did some cross-limb motion exercises which I found interesting because of the possible link between crawling and reading. I can find out more from my sister if you're interested.

It really hasn't caused her much problem other than the spelling and following directions. I wouldn't stress over it too much
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I'd love any info you could get me. He is seeing an OT during the school year, and he will also be seeing her for half on hour a week over the summer. So that's good. They mentioned it at the begining of the school year, but because they can't test for it until he is 7 they just let it go, now with everything I am seeing, I'm just wondering. But it may very well be like Michele said, and just a developmental stage. I am just trying to cover all the bases! It seems like an ever developing changing scene, which makes sense since his brain is developing and changing each day! I'll tell you I've learned so much over the last year about learning disabilities, special education, ADHD, diet, supplements, and just everyday coping my head feels like it is spinning some days trying to sort it all out! Thanks for the info and the reasurances!
 

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My daughter is 4, and among other problems, she has auditory processing "issues." They can't formally test until age 6, but we're fortunate enough to live in a school district that believes in helping early so maybe it won't have to develop into a full-blown "disorder." Rather than try to diagnose your son, let me tell you how this affects my daughter:

She can follow one-step directions as long as the words are accompanied by gestures. Two-step directions can be a problem.

For stories, she can answer labeling questions like, "Where is the frog?" or "What color is the cat?" She cannot answer questions like, "What did the boy do when he went to the store?"

If she asks, "Can I color?" she will get upset if I say "Yes." She needs to hear the words, "Yes, you can color." Her OT says it is because she not only has trouble processing words that others say, she also has trouble "hearing" the words that come out of her own mouth. This is also why she is known for meltdowns when I give her what she has asked for -- even though she *asked* for juice, that isn't what she wanted. She just can't get words and pictures to connect sometimes.

When people talk to her, she will pay attention, but she won't understand. We saw a new doctor at our last appointment, and rather than saying anything, I let him interact with her. After about 3 minutes of talking to her and getting inappropriate responses, he looked at me and said, "She isn't understanding me, is she?" Bingo.

Hope this helps,

Tara
 

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Now that I reread my reply I thought of a friend of mine who used the FastForword program with her son. It helped tremendously. Here is anouther website. http://www.scilearn.com/
My friend had to use the program from a school program because buying it is quite expensive. She said it was a computer program that you have your kiddo listen to the program for so many minutes a day. Anyways maybe check this out as well.
She qualified to get it free since she received services for her son.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by thoesly
She can follow one-step directions as long as the words are accompanied by gestures. Two-step directions can be a problem.

For stories, she can answer labeling questions like, "Where is the frog?" or "What color is the cat?" She cannot answer questions like, "What did the boy do when he went to the store?"

If she asks, "Can I color?" she will get upset if I say "Yes." She needs to hear the words, "Yes, you can color." Her OT says it is because she not only has trouble processing words that others say, she also has trouble "hearing" the words that come out of her own mouth. This is also why she is known for meltdowns when I give her what she has asked for -- even though she *asked* for juice, that isn't what she wanted. She just can't get words and pictures to connect sometimes.

When people talk to her, she will pay attention, but she won't understand. We saw a new doctor at our last appointment, and rather than saying anything, I let him interact with her. After about 3 minutes of talking to her and getting inappropriate responses, he looked at me and said, "She isn't understanding me, is she?" Bingo.
Tara
This hits the nail on the head. This is a perfect example.

I knew my daughter had AP when she was 2 or a little younger. I'd ask her if she wanted a cookie and she'd burst out crying. There were other examples just like that too.

I believe that my dd was formally tested at 4. Of course that was a private place and not the public schools who wouldn't even recognize non-verbal LD as a LD, at that time.

From what you told us I would guess that what you're talking about has to do with the ADHD. My dd has that too and although for us it all blends together, when you get into the diagnosis and you do a lot of reading about both... I'm just saying that it sounds like distractability to me. You gotta get them to "give you those eyeballs" when you're talking to them or who knows if they paid attention the whole time.

Just my opinion.
 
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