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I am wondering how many hours your little ones are spending in therapy and how old they are.<br><br>
My little boy is 3 and is doing 15 hours of ABA, 6 hours of preschool, 1 hour early head start. I would like him to be at 20-25 hours of ABA. I am also considering resuming Speech, but probably not OT, as the therapist seemed rather clueless and it was a big waste. (IMO)<br><br>
Are you happy with the amount of hours? Does it seem hard on your little one? Is it too hard? How do you simplify? I also have 2 girls- 5 years and 15 months who are typical thus far.<br><br>
I was worried when we started this many hours, but he is doing great! He seems a little stressed from time to time. I think overall he is slowly improving.<br><br>
Thank you mamas! I usually lurk due to NAK, but am feeling a lot of support. I will have to put the chichi girl down and GIVE some support now and then!<br><br>
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Well, my student is funded for 30 hours of ABA per week on top of being in a regular kindergarten class (with a 1:1 paraprofessional) 20 hours a week. During school, he receives 30 minutes of speech and also OT twice a week. I happen to think that OT is extremely important, so I would suggest that you look for another therapist. There are so many areas of autism for which OT can be helpful.<br><br>
Out of those 30 hours, I typically work with my student for 22, another woman works with him for 3, and I go to help out in his school for 2 hours a week. Then there are extra hours for paperwork, IEP preparation, etc.<br><br>
This means that my little guy starts school at 8, gets an hour for lunch, and then I work with him from 1-6. Some people think that this is an insane amount of time for a young child. But if they don't know about autism, they don't understand that typical kids, during the afterschool period, would be learning through observation, helping parents around the house, playing imaginatively with peers, etc. My student doesn't do this, and so he needs much more hours that are structured to help him not fall even more behind his peers.<br><br>
I also teach him naturally whenever possible, trying to move away from discrete trial whenever I can, especially because he learns so quickly and often doesn't need to do many of the little steps. He also has shown us that he knows much more than anyone has ever asked him. So I've found that I can often do things with him without formally teaching him, because he has already gained the knowledge through his other programs and everyday life. So he has learned through observation, mostly in a very functional way.<br><br>
I interviewed his mother and she said that his home program was the therapy that had helped him the most since we take a creative way to teach him, making it individual for him, and not running it as an "autism program" where things are always done in a strict way.
 
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