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Hi. I'm trying to help my friend not freak out about not having milk right away after birth. She's heard about the colostrum and just doesn't believe that the baby can survive all day with just a tablespoon or so. She's having twins so she's doubly worried, but I remember reading somewhere or hearing in one of my pre-labor classes that babies are actually born with enough nutrients to survive for 72 hours without any kind of supplementation at all. (or something like that) Not that it's ideal, but that we're born with that kind of leeway in order to increase our chances of survival.<br><br>
Anyone else heard of this?<br><br>
TIA <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/winner.jpg" style="border:0px solid;" title="BFSymbol">
 

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Babies only need colostrum when they're born - that's why our milk doesn't come in for a few days (mother nature is smart like that <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> )<br><br>
Good info here:<br><br><a href="http://lalecheleague.org/FAQ/colostrum.html" target="_blank">http://lalecheleague.org/FAQ/colostrum.html</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">A 1 day old baby's stomach capacity is about 5-7 ml, or about the size of a marble. Interestingly, researchers have found that the day-old newborn's stomach does not stretch to hold more. Since the walls of the newborn's stomach stays firm, extra milk is most often expelled (spit up). Your colostrum is just the right amount for your baby's first feedings!<br><br>
By day 3, the newborn's stomach capacity has grown to about 0.75-1 oz, or about the size of a "shooter" marble. Small, frequent feedings assure that your baby takes in all the milk he needs.<br><br>
Around day 7, the newborn's stomach capacity is now about 1.5-2 oz, or about the size of a ping-pong ball. Continued frequent feeding will assure that your baby takes in all the milk he needs, and your milk production meets his demands.</td>
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Anecdotally, I seem to remember a couple of years ago there was a brief blurb in the newspaper about a newborn that was found alive approximately a week after an earthquake.<br><br>
If anyone else remembers more details about this I'd love to hear them.<br>
~Cath
 

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Google "brown fat". It's a special type of fat that only newborns have, iirc. It's easier to convert into energy than regular fat.
 

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Well, my big healthy 3 year old waited 5 days for my milk to come in and did just fine (well, he cried, but he was otherwise fine). Babies don't need more than colostrum for the first few days, that's all they're meant to have.
 

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Babies are born with extra weight to tide them over while they wait for the milk to come in. There's an expected post-patum weight loss in a baby, but by a certain point, they are expected to have gained it back.
 

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just wanted to chime in and say my first son had major latch issues in the beginning and went almost a full 5 days before an LC was able to help me out. my sis in law actually pumped some milk for me by that 5th day just in case so i could buy time instead of resorting to formula.
 

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ask her how she thinks the human race made it this far, did the cavemen buy formula at walmart too?<br><br><br>
(sorry GEICO caveman, I hope you are not offended by my crude example)
 
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