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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The midwife checked the baby's position on Tues. and said it's back is up against the right side of my stomach (the head is down). She said a few good contractions could take care of it, but she'd like me to get on my hands and knees and rock my hips back and forth to try and move the baby's back to the front of my stomach.
I don't know why, but I've really avoided being on my hands and knees throughout the pregnancy. I have a prenatal workout DVD that I sometimes do and I always skipped the exercises where you have to be in that position. For some reason I don't feel comfortable with it. Am I just being ridiculous?
And how bad is it to have the baby's back on the side instead of the front? Will that really complicate labor?
 

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My dd was in that position when I was in labor, 6 cm dilated 100% effaced. She turned most of the way into the correct position by the time I had the urge to push, but I had to get into all sorts of positions and work hard to get her head past my pubic bone because it didn't turn all the way into the correct position. After birth her head was tilted and turned to the side for a couple days until her muscles worked themselves out. So...it can complicate things a bit.

That said, if you don't feel comfortable doing the exercises now, you probably have a while to wait until you go into labor and baby may move into a different position on his or her own.

If it were me, I'd definitely get on my hands and knees if my baby was in that position when my first contraction hit!
 

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Well, according to www.spinningbabies.com, ROA (what your baby is) is 1/4 turn from posterior. Most babys will not spin around towards the front when going from ROA to LOA (ideal position for birth), rather they turn posterior first and then LOA. So I think your MW is smart to encourage proper positioning. It may help move the baby before the labor starts. Some of the risks of a ROA/OP baby is long prodormal labor, delayed start of labor, labor stalling, and possibly Csection.
 

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To give you another perspective, if your body is saying "hey you, don't get on h-k" that might be an intuition you should follow. My body always loved h-k when pregnant. Do you get the same feeling floating on your belly in the pool? Are there other forward leaning positions that do make you comfortable?

My first child was LOT and stayed there through the end of pregnancy and only did the quarter turn toward the end of dilation.

My second child was a wild squiggler and I never knew whether he would be LOA, ROA or just OA
up to 41+1 when we birthed. This was a dream labor -- short, easy, all daytime and a fantastic short 2nd stage with an 11 pounder. I just want to give a little buffer to the last post by Jen, who has stated what many midwives think about the tendencies and problems with babies being on the right. I think it's probably correct (but haven't looked at any research).

What needs to be said along with this, is that in an unhindered birth, the baby and mom do the dance without these formalities and structures of predicting doom unless XYZ formula is applied, that caregivers are often so fond of. Caregivers need structure to feel in control, and clients typically want to believe that the caregiver can exert control over the outcome, and that combination is one of the stones in the foundation for the hatred of nice vertex babies on the right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
this is what spinning babies says:

ROA
Baby's back is in the front right and feet hardly felt in the left.
The heartbeat heard on the right and the back of the neck would be felt a bit towards the right.
Since I have been routinely charting the fetal head position in late pregnancy, I have not felt a baby in an ROA starting position. I don't have access to ultrasound verification, but I don't think ROA is a "start" position. I don't think babies like to face the descending colon coming down through mother's left rear pelvis. Many babies who start OP, ROP and ROT will move past ROA momentarily, then swing LOT to engage in the pelvis, move below the sacral promontory, and then emerge in OA. Fewer babies engage as ROT and rotate to ROA in midpelvis, and continue down to finish as either an ROA or OA.

huh? ok now I"m even more confused.

I guess I'm just not really sure why getting on my hands and knees is going to make the baby move it's back to the center- and isn't there a possibility of sort of "disengaging" the head from where it is now, very down low? I sleep and lay on my left side a lot, and at the computer I sit on a chair backwards- I don't get why the baby has chosen this position.

I am willing to do it if it is very important to do so. I suppose I should have asked more questions at my m/w appt!! lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by anonymommy
To give you another perspective, if your body is saying "hey you, don't get on h-k" that might be an intuition you should follow. .
this is what worries me. I could definitely just be "overlistening" to myself, but for a long time I've thought the only way I'll do h/k is if there's a cord prolapse. otherwise it feels very wrong. it's not something that ever bothered me before pregnancy. so then this whole train of thought that "why do I not want to be in that position" starts, and I end up not knowing if I'm just being paranoid or what.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by bri276
this is what spinning babies says:

ROA
Baby's back is in the front right and feet hardly felt in the left.
The heartbeat heard on the right and the back of the neck would be felt a bit towards the right.
Since I have been routinely charting the fetal head position in late pregnancy, I have not felt a baby in an ROA starting position. I don't have access to ultrasound verification, but I don't think ROA is a "start" position. I don't think babies like to face the descending colon coming down through mother's left rear pelvis. Many babies who start OP, ROP and ROT will move past ROA momentarily, then swing LOT to engage in the pelvis, move below the sacral promontory, and then emerge in OA. Fewer babies engage as ROT and rotate to ROA in midpelvis, and continue down to finish as either an ROA or OA.

huh? ok now I"m even more confused.

Yikes, that is confusing. To be honest, I do think the site is prety confusing. But I took the workshop, which clarified a lot. She showed diagrams and such about how babies rotate and that is what I remember - that one their way from ROA to LOA, they tend to turn posterior.

Of course there are exceptions as Anonymommy noted. ROA is also less of an issue with 2nd time+ moms, because their uterus is less tight and allows more movement.

Also, I think you are thinking of knee-chest for cord prolapse. Hands and knees just allows your belly to hang forward and hopefully helps the baby rotate its back towards gravity. But if you are uncomfortable with that, don't do it. How about swimming? Or chiropractic. Both are great for lining up babies.
 

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I have seen many babies born ROA. It definitely isn't something that is a given - sometimes there are reasons why babies are ROA - esp if the placenta is on the front of the uterus and on the left side!

I wuld think that if you're a first time mom, just maintaining good posture (no knees higher than your hips) is all you need. Chances are, your baby will settle down in the best position for him/her.
 

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I just second, third, fourth, fifth your listening to your intuition. You have a clear feeling on no h-k. I wouldn't do it then!

Like Pamela said good posture is probably the most important thing right now & making sure that you're not sitting reclined at all.

WIshing you a happy healthy rest of your pregnancy and a beautiful labor and birth.
 

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My baby has been on the right side this whole pregnancy, and now at 35 weeks is ROA. Bum under my right ribs. My placenta is anterior, maybe Pam is right in my case

Quote:
I have seen many babies born ROA. It definitely isn't something that is a given - sometimes there are reasons why babies are ROA - esp if the placenta is on the front of the uterus and on the left side!
hmm. I didn't realize ROA was something to worry about. I would have thought to be more afraid of posterior at this point, I hate having something to worry about now about my babies position. I was just happy not to be breech.
 

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Both of my pregnancies (not including my miscarriage), babies were ROA. First was a 10 hour labor with intense back labor. Second was a 2 1/2 hour labor with no back labor. I was concerned with the second pregnancy, but felt like my baby knew where he needed to be. Second pregnancy, my placenta was anterior, so maybe that had something to do with it.

Happy Birthing!
 
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