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Has/does anyone use these with their children? I used them with my daughter starting at about 6 months. I thought it was great. She could really communicate a lot of ideas and I think it really lessened her frustration. When she learned to speak, I thought her vocabulary was great for her age and I attribute this to baby signs as well.<br><br>
I have a nephew who will be 2 soon and all he does is scream and grunt (and hit, kick and bite) and he has reminded me of how frustrating it can be at that age not to be able to verbalize needs and wants. I'm going to start baby signing soon with my son and am excited to see how he responds.<br><br>
what have your experiences been with baby signing?
 

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I have heard great things about baby signs. I would love to try with my ds (just 7 mos now) and was looking for a good book this past weekend. What do you recommend?<br><br>
tug
 

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I have this book, which I think is pretty good. There might be better ones out there that I haven't seen though.<br><br><a href="http://www.babysigns.com/" target="_blank">http://www.babysigns.com/</a><br><br>
I had a lot of fun with it, and My dd seemed to love "talking" to us.<br><br>
I hope you try it! I think boys take a little longer to catch on to it than girls, and if your child has another caregiver or is in daycare, it's better if you can enlist their help and be sure that everyone does the signs the same way.
 

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There are different types of sign language (I didn't know this until I started seeing baby-sign books) and they have different signs for the same thing. Your library, or most chain bookstores should have both kinds of books. Also, there is a kids bookclub where you can order some videos, my mom got some so she could figure out what my son was trying to tell her.<br>
I sign with my 19 month old son, we use American Sign Language, because I know a couple of people who are either deaf or hearing impaired. We started when he was about 10 months, and it took him awhile to pick up the signs, at first he just thought laughed at me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes">: When he figured out that I could understand him when <i>he</i> signed, he'd get excited and picked them up alot faster. Now he learns a new sign about every 2-3 days.<br>
Good luck!
 

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I 've done sign language with both my girls, and they do very well with it. My 15 month old uses it a lot and I'm trying to learn more. I took an ASL class myself, thats where my interest started with it.
 

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I'm deaf, dd's hearing, she's been signing from about 6 months old... definitely a huge impact (positive) on the "terrible twos". She also is now waaaaaaay advanced for her age when it comes to spoken language in addition to ASL. (Definitely teach ASL if at all possible. ASL is an actual language rather than a sign system.)
 

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I bought the Sign With Your Baby Complete Learning Kit (ASL-based Book, Training Video & Quick Reference Guide combination) by Joseph Garcia<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fexec%2Fobidos%2Ftg%2Fdetail%2F-%2F0966836707%2Fqid%3D1062557662%2Fsr%3D8-1%2Fref%3Dsr_8_1%2F102-2427294-7794517%3Fv%3Dglance%26s%3Dbooks%26n%3D507846" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846</a><br><br>
and it worked great! Our daughter was able to communicate all kinds of things to us before she learned to speak. Babies can learn to communicate with their hands much earlier than they can learn to speak. I think the first humans probably communicated with their hands rather than with their mouths.<br><br>
Ever since my daughter learned to speak, her vocabulary has been very advanced for her age.
 

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Is 10 months too late to start?
 

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most of the stuff I looked at suggested anywhere between 9 and 12, with some going as early as 6, so 10 should be great.<br><br>
tug
 

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Devrock, what exactly does "ASL-based" mean? Is it a modified version of ASL? I'm asking because I'd like to try it with a real language that can my baby can actually use later on. (We know a couple of people who know ASL either professionally or because their parents are Deaf.)<br><br>
Also, how soon can you start? Possibly before six months? My baby's only 6 weeks now but I'm already chomping at the bit!
 

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I started teaching DD baby signs at 9 months, and she started signing at 11 months. (BTW - ASL is American Sign Language, which is the standard for the hearing impaired) Baby sign language is different. I bought the book Baby Signs by Goodwyn & Agredolo (sp?) Basically when your baby learns to wave bye-bye, that's a baby sign.<br><br>
DD is almost 17 months now and knows, gosh, probably 75 or more signs (she learns 2-3 a day now, as many as I teach her). An example of how wonderful it is I shared recently: She can tell me safety signs, such as when she's hungry, wet, thirsty, hot, cold - all of which are wonderful. In a restaurant recently, she began signing cold - cold and I asked if she was cold and she said "yes", and I looked up and sure enough, she was under a vent. Had she not been able to communicate, she would have started crying and we would chlk it up to toddler not wanting to be in restaurant!<br><br>
She's even made up some of her own - for "daddy" and "magnificient"!<br><br>
She rarely has temper tantrums because she can communicate to me what she needs. While many toddlers learn to say "NO" mine says "yes" because she can sign and I reiterate what she is saying and she confirms her need/want. I cannot recommend it enough. Here's a good website: <a href="http://www.littlesigners.com" target="_blank">http://www.littlesigners.com</a>
 

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I have addressed the idea of "baby signs" vs. ASL before, so will just cut and paste:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by sozobe</i><br><b>One thing I wanted to get in there -- while there is certainly nothing wrong with made-up signs ("home signs"), and a lot that is great about it, it is not the equivalent to ASL. ASL signs have liguistic commonalities, the manual equivalent of phonemes (the building blocks of language), and lots of other good linguistic stuff that has been shown to aid in general language development.</b></td>
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This was written about "home signs", but goes for "baby signs" too.<br><br>
This, too:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by sozobe</i><br><b>Very brief rant which I already mostly covered in the above post -- it took so long for ASL to be recognized as a real language, and in that context it makes me wince a little bit when it as seen as interchangeable with homesigns (made-up signs.) One is a language, a real language, one is not. That doesn't mean that there is anything wrong with home signs, really, just that they are another kettle of fish. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></b></td>
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Both are from this thread:<br><br><a href="http://mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?s=&threadid=61886" target="_blank">http://mothering.com/discussions/sho...threadid=61886</a><br><br>
ANY sign is wonderful, as the "cold" example illustrates... that's great! I just want to be sure that the difference between signed systems (home signs, non-ASL "baby signs") and ASL are clear.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by melixxa</i><br><b>Devrock, what exactly does "ASL-based" mean? Is it a modified version of ASL?<br><br>
Also, how soon can you start? Possibly before six months? My baby's only 6 weeks now but I'm already chomping at the bit!</b></td>
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<br>
Almost all of the signs are ASL. One or two of them are not, because they thought simpler signs would be easier for babies. However, I wanted to use ASL exclusively, and babies end up using their own simpler versions of the signs anyway, so I looked up the one or two non-ASL signs that they used (they are labeled as such) in an ASL dictionary that I have, and I taught my daughter the ASL signs.<br><br>
I believe they recommend starting around seven months, but I don't see any reason why you couldn't start showing your baby the signs now. Just don't expect your child to start signing them back to you for a while. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> (Even when you wait until 7 months to start showing your baby the signs, it's still a few months before the child can sign back to you.)
 

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Yep, early exposure is a good thing. In terms of talking, for example, we don't think, "well, they won't be able to talk yet, so I won't say anything." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
My dd made her first sign ("Mama") when she was 4 months old, was signing a few things at 6 months old, and really took off around 10 months old.<br><br>
Devrock, that's really cool about looking up the ASL sign. The talking analogy applies here, too -- even if a baby can't say "Balloon" properly, you don't say nothing but "Bawoo" to her to compensate.<br><br>
Here's a cool site, FYI:<br><br><a href="http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/browser.htm" target="_blank">http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/browser.htm</a>
 

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Devrock, this is exactly what I wanted to know. I definitely want to use a "system" that is exclusively ASL yet presented in a way that I can use for teaching my baby (and myself...). I'm not interested in made-up "language lite" precisely because we have a proper language already - ASL - that my baby can only benefit from being exposed to early!<br><br>
On that note, thanks for posting the quotes and the link, sozobe. These are exactly the reasons I'd like to work with ASL. As I suspected (and had confirmed by your pasted-in contributions), going with a language system like home signs or baby signs seems like the equivalent of trying to write a dissertation using wooden alphabet building blocks.<br><br>
Right now I'm looking around in my county for a beginning ASL class that I can take. I took an informal course in college for a semester, and once had my own beginner's textbook (since lent out to someone and never seen again), but I really can't remember a thing. For our final, I remember, we had to translate a song and then sign it for the class.
 

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I have 4 kids, aged 12, 8, 5, and 5 weeks. I started out teaching them standard ASL.... I, too, really encourage people to learn ASL baby signs because it's more universal and more practical. For example, I can communicate with my kids across a busy, crowded room without yelling or saying anything and best of all you can communicate with other ASL signers.<br><br>
Another good site is <a href="http://www.signwithme.com" target="_blank">www.signwithme.com</a> which gives a long list of words plus an accompanying short video of each sign.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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That's a nice site! I hadn't seen that one before, thanks!<br><br>
A very quick observation, having seen only two signs, but the first one, "airplane", isn't actually right. Well, it's not WRONG, but it's the verb -- "an airplane is flying through the sky" -- rather than the noun, "airplane", which it is meant to illustrate.<br><br>
babyboysleep, it's really useful in long-distance situations, isn't it? Other times I'm happy she knows ASL are when we are both eating (mouths full), when I am asking her if she needs to use the potty (inconspicuous "potty?" sign in any circumstances), when I am giving disciplinary suggestions, ("share!"), etc. Lots of uses.<br><br>
Devrock, glad my observations were useful. I not only have personal experience but a graduate degree in Deaf Education, and worry about being pedantic (as in the above... but if we're talking about the grammar aspect, verb vs. noun is kinda important...)<br><br>
At any rate, I am always impressed with how many hearing people are teaching their kids ASL. That's WONDERFUL! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 
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