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OK, I know (logically) that one should not be so annoyed with their child for acting like a baby, but I feel like sending her to time out for this!<br><br>
DD just turned four and has picked up this incredibly annoying behavior of talking like a toddler, like in two word sentences with a lisp. She has always been a little bit of a mimic, able to repeat back whole paragraphs out of books or telling me the whole story from her books on tape, stuff like that. I'm pretty sure she's mimicking our friends' dd, who is 2.5, very beautiful, and very gregarious. Also, her parents (our friends) are really into "showcasing" her, IYKWIM, trying to get her say cute little quips, do little tricks, retelling stories about how cute she was. It's slightly annoying, but a lot of parents do this, and I totally understand the impulse. However, I think my dd has somehow gotten the idea that everyone thinks that this kid is is too cute or something, and wants to act like her. Or maybe she's just wanting to revert a little. Either way, it's driving me crazy. She even tries to run like a toddler sometimes.<br><br>
Any ideas? Any perspective? I really want my logical and talkative four year old back!
 

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"Sorry, honey, I can't catch what you're saying - can you repeat it more clearly?"<br><br>
"What's that, sweetheart? I can't understand you."<br><br>
"What are you asking for? I'm afraid I don't understand you unless you speak clearly."<br><br>
"What a fine clear speaking voice you have."<br><br>
I think the above could stress the disadvantages of the 'cute lisp', coupled with recognition of her own nice clear voice.<br><br>
Sigh. I still remember being 4 years old, at naptime at daycare, feeling so envious of the 'cute' kid when all the workers were saying 'aww' - she had fallen asleep in a particularly adorable pose. The next day, I rearranged myself into the same pose at naptime, and was crushed when the caregiver just told me to lie down properly. Tread softly...it's tough for a child trying to figure out why another one gets so much attention!
 

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Maybe if you just give her some extra attention and cuddle time she will forget about her babytalk antics. Sounds like you have good insight into why she is doing it. It is good you realize she isn't doing it to annoy you on purpose.<br><br>
I know what you mean about how annoying that can be. I personally love babytalk in a baby. In a four year old, not so much.<br><br>
~Tracy
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mammastar2</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7888903"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Sigh. I still remember being 4 years old, at naptime at daycare, feeling so envious of the 'cute' kid when all the workers were saying 'aww' - she had fallen asleep in a particularly adorable pose. The next day, I rearranged myself into the same pose at naptime, and was crushed when the caregiver just told me to lie down properly. Tread softly...it's tough for a child trying to figure out why another one gets so much attention!</div>
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Oh, that made me want to give your four year old self a little hug.<br><br>
I know she's trying it on for size, and she actually tells me occasionally that she wishes she were a baby again. I really try to let her talk about this, but honestly sometimes I just don't have time. Due to the fact that I have a real baby and a toddler. So then I just feel lots and lots of guilt for not planning my family a little better. Not a very healthy reaction on my part. I am going to try to fit in more snuggling and alone time with her. The baby has pneumonia so he's been taking a lot of my time lately. I guess that's probably exacerbating the situation.
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mammastar2</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7888903"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">"Sorry, honey, I can't catch what you're saying - can you repeat it more clearly?"<br><br>
"What's that, sweetheart? I can't understand you."<br><br>
"What are you asking for? I'm afraid I don't understand you unless you speak clearly."<br><br>
"What a fine clear speaking voice you have."<br><br>
I think the above could stress the disadvantages of the 'cute lisp', coupled with recognition of her own nice clear voice.<br><br>
Sigh. I still remember being 4 years old, at naptime at daycare, feeling so envious of the 'cute' kid when all the workers were saying 'aww' - she had fallen asleep in a particularly adorable pose. The next day, I rearranged myself into the same pose at naptime, and was crushed when the caregiver just told me to lie down properly. Tread softly...it's tough for a child trying to figure out why another one gets so much attention!</div>
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Good suggestions, and as far as the rest...that's AWFUL! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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My 4 year old does it too. It's seems to be game or something but I totally ignore it. I feel like if I address it I will lose my patience.<br>
In the morinng she says, "juice peese"<br>
This is the same kid who started talking at 9 mos and was always complimented on how articulate and easily understood she was. The baby talk feels like a blow to MY pride so I really let it go b/c it feels like my issue. However I tell her she can not speak that to her brother b/c he can't talk yet and we have teach the proper way to say things so he doesn't confused <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
It does drive me batty, though. Good luck
 

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DD (2.5) does a perfect imitation of Caillou. It drives me batty. She just loves to watch that show, but I try not to let her see it every day, because she starts walking around talking like Caillou in that annoying little whiney sing songy voice!<br><br>
I second the "I can't understand you" comments, and not making a big deal of it.
 

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Just posting that my DD does this too. She's incredibly verbal, yet she comes home from daycare whining "Wawa! Wawa!" with this gleam in her eye (when she is perfectly capable of "Can I have a glass of water after I'm done playing on the swings?") I really TRY not to make a big deal out of it, and just say, "What? I can't understand you."<br><br>
(It is then somewhat humorous when she says, "I said WAWA! That means I'm asking you for some water.")<br><br>
I know it's just an imitative/possibly attention-getting thing. I am aware that it irritates me more than it should. I wonder what it is about children "acting" younger that pushes buttons? I don't even have younger kids, so it's not that.<br><br>
By the way, DD is a total mimic and a big reciter, too.
 

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My 6 yr old is doing this too and has been for the past month. She says a friend at school taught her. It's been driving me nutty. My DH thought it was because we found out I'm expecting, but it started before that and continues to get worse.<br><br>
I ignore her until she is more articulate with what she's asking if it's directed at me, or tell her I can't understand her. She talks non-stop anyway- to herself, the wall, her crayons, etc. She just LOVES the sound of her own voice!<br><br>
'Manda, mommy to Pixie 6.5 yrs, expecting another in Nov.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>hipumpkins</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7893810"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">This is the same kid who started talking at 9 mos and was always complimented on how articulate and easily understood she was. The baby talk feels like a blow to MY pride so I really let it go b/c it feels like my issue.</div>
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Oh, yeah, I think you hit the nail on the head here. This is how my dd was too. And I've always kind of been an opponent of baby talk anyway, always using the correct word for things and not just the word that the baby says.<br><br>
Why is it so annoying when older children act younger? I have seen people before who seem to think it's cute, but it's sure not to me. I'm going to try ignoring it more religiously.
 
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