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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there actually a difference orr is it just a gimmick? My regular digital thermometer reads to a tenth of a degree so I figure it must be as accurate as one marketed as a basal body thermometer, right?
 

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You would think so wouldn't you? But when I've heard this question asked on other forums, the answer is always that the BBT is much more accurate, and more importantly, consistant. HOWEVER, if you try the one you have and it works for you, then there's no real reason to change. I just know a lot of women have problems that are solved when they switch to a BBT thermometor.
 

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one thing that is different with a basel is that it has a smaller range, it will not go high enough to test out a fever for instance, so supposedly it is more precise in the range it does have.<br><br>
i think the bigger thing to make sure id that you leave it in for long enough, even if it is a rapid read version, it needs to be left in for about a minute at minimum, i have proven time and time again that the temp continues to climb past the beeping and does level out 30- 45 seconds later.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Rivka </strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10742179"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">one thing that is different with a basel is that it has a smaller range, it will not go high enough to test out a fever for instance, so supposedly it is more precise in the range it does have.</div>
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My BD BBT is the only thermometer I have and this cycle it measured my fever from the flu up to 104. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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I'm so glad you posted this. I was wondering the same thing. I have been using a BBT because I read that it was supposed to be more accurate, but was wondering why.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sk8ermaiden</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10742362"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My BD BBT is the only thermometer I have and this cycle it measured my fever from the flu up to 104. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"></div>
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i first guess is that you have something that is being called a basal therm and is really not. i went and look up the info by definition and got this:<br><br><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_thermometer" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_thermometer</a><br><i>"Glass fever thermometers typically have markings every 0.2ºF (0.1ºC). Basal thermometers require accuracy of at least 0.1ºF (0.05ºC), so special glass basal thermometers are sold separately from glass fever thermometers. All digital thermometers generally read to at least 0.1ºF (0.05ºC) and so are suitable for monitoring basal temperatures. Some digital thermometers are marketed as "basal thermometers" and have extra features such as a larger display, expanded memory functions, or beeping to confirm the thermometer is placed properly."</i><br><br>
and this: <a href="http://www.ebme.co.uk/arts/temp/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ebme.co.uk/arts/temp/index.htm</a><br><i>"Whereas ordinary household thermometers express body temperature to only one decimal place (e.g. 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit), basal thermometers express body temperature to two decimals places (e.g. 98.56 degrees Fahrenheit)."</i><br><br>
so there seems to be some disagreement in what they really are and it is not a standard naming for sure. the word "Basal" comes from what it is measuring, your basal body temp, not what kind of thermometer is doing the measuring.<br><br>
now in glass ones i can see that a basel one would have a smaller range since they were marking off each .1 rather than each .2 so the results are that it does not have room to include fever temps since they are not what you are looking for, this restriction does not need to be applied to digital ones.<br><br>
Does this seem to make sense to everyone else?
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Rivka </strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10748087"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">i first guess is that you have something that is being called a basal therm and is really not. i went and look up the info by definition and got this:<br><br><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_thermometer" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_thermometer</a><br><i>"Glass fever thermometers typically have markings every 0.2ºF (0.1ºC). Basal thermometers require accuracy of at least 0.1ºF (0.05ºC), so special glass basal thermometers are sold separately from glass fever thermometers. All digital thermometers generally read to at least 0.1ºF (0.05ºC) and so are suitable for monitoring basal temperatures. Some digital thermometers are marketed as "basal thermometers" and have extra features such as a larger display, expanded memory functions, or beeping to confirm the thermometer is placed properly."</i><br><br>
and this: <a href="http://www.ebme.co.uk/arts/temp/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ebme.co.uk/arts/temp/index.htm</a><br><i>"Whereas ordinary household thermometers express body temperature to only one decimal place (e.g. 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit), basal thermometers express body temperature to two decimals places (e.g. 98.56 degrees Fahrenheit)."</i><br><br>
so there seems to be some disagreement in what they really are and it is not a standard naming for sure. the word "Basal" comes from what it is measuring, your basal body temp, not what kind of thermometer is doing the measuring.<br><br>
now in glass ones i can see that a basel one would have a smaller range since they were marking off each .1 rather than each .2 so the results are that it does not have room to include fever temps since they are not what you are looking for, this restriction does not need to be applied to digital ones.<br><br>
Does this seem to make sense to everyone else?</div>
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Yes, it's definitely a Basal thermometor as it's the brand Toni Weishler reccomends in her book. (TCOYF).<br><br>
It does make sense. If it's true than most (non-glass) BBTs that you can buy are just digitals with memories, backlights and bigger displays.<br><br>
But I still believe they have to be calibrated more closely or something because I've known many, many girls who had their charts become more accurate after switching to a BBT from a regular digital.
 

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OK, so I went out and bought a thermometer specifically marketed as a "basal body thermometer" last night. It <i>is</i> more precise because it measures to a further decimal place than my digital. Whether this actually will make a big difference for charting I'm not sure. I mean, the chart intervals are only 0.1 degree anyway, right? But, hey, it's PINK and it beeps!
 

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strange that one that Toni recommends would be of a type that she says are not basal type.<br>
From page 76 of TCOYF " But BBT thermometers only register up to 100 Degrees F., so if you have reason to believe you are developing a fever, be sure to use a fever thermometer during those days."<br><br>
is there a spot in the book that she recommends a specific brand? i did not se that<br>
i think one of the reasons that many women get smoother more accurate charts when switching is that they take the temp for a longer time as opposed to relying on rapid read digitals, which are also really good , when just left in for the 1 minute plus that most normal ones really need, a true BBT will be kept in up to 5 min!
 

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I think the most important thing about the thermometer is having it be <i>consistent</i>. Mine is, so I wanted to cast a vote for my cheapo digital fever thermometer.<br><br>
Temping is a big-picture enterprise, where the whole cycle matters more than any individual temperature, and the trouble many of us have is being able to see the forest through the trees. So it doesn't matter much to my temping if I have multiple decimal places.<br><br>
"Basal" just means your temp when your body is at rest, doesn't it?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Rivka </strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10749406"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">strange that one that Toni recommends would be of a type that she says are not basal type.<br>
From page 76 of TCOYF " But BBT thermometers only register up to 100 Degrees F., so if you have reason to believe you are developing a fever, be sure to use a fever thermometer during those days."<br><br>
is there a spot in the book that she recommends a specific brand? i did not see that<br>
i think one of the reasons that many women get smoother more accurate charts when switching is that they take the temp for a longer time as opposed to relying on rapid read digitals, which are also really good , when just left in for the 1 minute plus that most normal ones really need, a true BBT will be kept in up to 5 min!</div>
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From the Ovusoft forum's online shopping center. (I don't have the book on me, so I can't check in there)<br><br><a href="http://www.ovusoft.com/shop/item.asp?ID=12" target="_blank">http://www.ovusoft.com/shop/item.asp?ID=12</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">This is the thermometer recommended by Ovusoft and Toni Weschler for tracking your temperatures in the practice of fertility awareness.</td>
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But I think you're right about why they get more stable charts with the BBT thermometer. That would make perfect sense.
 
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