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I drank my first 2 quarts of raw cow milk kefir I bought from a local farm. I drank about half a quart each the first 2 days but geeez did it make me bloaty & gassy (I'm so embarrassed to discuss such things in public, but I really would like an answer!
)! So the next quart I drank over 3 days but I had the same symptoms. I drink raw cow milk without those symtoms.

I've read that kefir will work to kill off bad gut bacterias, would drinking such a small amount of it have done that? And that's what lead to such the terrible gassiness?
And- how long should I expect such annoying symptoms??


I want to begin an anti-candida/low sugar diet & want to learn how to include kefir & homemade yogurt into my diet but I do NOT want to be the Bloaty Queen!!

Thanks for any advice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
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Great. Am I the only one who suffers this way from Kefir?
 

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Kefir does not make me feel this way, but when I started on raw milk I had a similar experience. The reason is your intestinal bacteria is adjusting to the new enzymes and new bacteria and there is some natural die-off of bad bacteria. It's a good sign, but you should probably work into it a little more slowly. Try 4 oz a day for a week or so and then go up to 8 for a week and see how more treats you. The adjustment can be slow for some.
HTH!
 

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Homemade yogurt that is fermented for 24 hours, will have an average concentration of 3 billion cfu/mL of yogurt. If you were to eat a small bowl (500 ml) of 24 hour fermented homemade yogurt, you would receive 1.5 trillion beneficial bacteria - 100 times more bacteria than a 15 billion capsule.

Furthermore, freshly made kefir can have an average microbial count as high as 10 billion cfu/ml. This includes a mixture of various beneficia bacteria and beneficial yeast strains. This means that a 500 ml glass of homemade kefir could contain as many as 5 trillion beneficial microorganisms or even more!

Basically, you have a "turf war" going on when you displace and replace microbials. And those that are displaced/killed off, decompose and are excreted. Those create bloating and detoxing.

Start a bit slower.


Pat
 

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I've had the same gas/bloating issues with water kefir. I've been drinking close to 1 quart a day for several weeks and I think it's getting better, slowly.

And now I'm worried because I just made some yogurt this morning and had a 6 oz jar plain, plus I made waffles with it (in addition to driking water kefir). That's a lot of bacteria!

WuWei, I made almond milk yogurt. Would that have the same amount of good bacteria? And it did not set but is runny (like thick milk). I assume that didn't affect the good properties of the yogurt. Is that correct?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by waluso View Post
I've had the same gas/bloating issues with water kefir. I've been drinking close to 1 quart a day for several weeks and I think it's getting better, slowly.

And now I'm worried because I just made some yogurt this morning and had a 6 oz jar plain, plus I made waffles with it (in addition to driking water kefir). That's a lot of bacteria!

WuWei, I made almond milk yogurt. Would that have the same amount of good bacteria? And it did not set but is runny (like thick milk). I assume that didn't affect the good properties of the yogurt. Is that correct?
A lot of probiotics won't hurt, just cause some odiferous side effects.


The probiotics are killed by heat. So, those in the waffles are toast.

I've heard that nut yogurts don't get as thick. They probably have some fewer microbials than when using raw milk, because raw milk has its own prebiotics, enzymes, and probiotics also. I believe that non-dairy starters may have fewer probiotics in the starter. So, I'd definitely go with any kefir, over yogurt, if you choose which to make. But, toss down some kombucha occasionally too.


And some fermented vegetables. We get the Bubbies sauerkraut and pickles. I've not ventured into fermenting my own vegetables yet. I'm kinda afraid of growing bacteria.


Pat
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
A lot of probiotics won't hurt, just cause some odiferous side effects.
Want to amend for mamas who are nursing. There are toxins excreted into our body when the yeast die off, which could be transferred to breastmilk, theoretically.

So, do start slowly with probiotics which are displacing yeast.

Pat
 
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