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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi-- my daughter has very recently been diagnosed with ASD and anxiety disorder. The diagnosing psych recommended she continue in her pragmatics speech group and start behavioral therapy. I found a therapist that takes our insurance, but he wants to do his own testing despite my signing a release for records. Our insurance will not cover his testing and it starts at $750. We can not afford this.

So... Do we start looking for another therapist? Or is this par for the course? What would you do? Thanks in advance!
 

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Do you have a good feeling about this therapist?

Maybe tell the therapist that you cannot afford the extra testing and see how they respond? Are they willing to work around not having whatever information they were hoping to get from the test?

Sorry, you are in this situation. I wonder what the testing is for? Obviously, you've done some testing to get a diagnosis...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Chalex. I'm actually on the fence about the therapist. I'll ask about his testing-- if we can't skip out I'll find another. He gave me a bunch of handouts at our first meeting that seemed to be a bit fear-mongering and he gave me a list of medications. I just don't know what to expect from a therapist at all....
 

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Are there specific tests he wants to do that have not already been done? Or does he just want to re-invent the wheel? I would ask what specific test(s) he wants to do, how they are different from the testing that was just done, and how he feels that information would be helpful in forming a treatment plan.


If he wants to repeat testing that was recently done, then I would look for another therapist.


I'm sorry you are going through this. I also have a DD with autism and anxiety. She has had a variety of tests at different times for different reasons. For a while, she was in talk therapy for anxiety, and her therapist (who was wonderful) didn't do any additional testing. She just addressed the anxiety with cognitive behavioral therapy.
 

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I would definitely ask 1) What specific tests, 2) What information do you think is needed that was not obtained via the other tests and 2) How will any findings change what you do? I would do this actually in any medical situation where someone wanted to do what seem like redundant tests. If the person can't answer #2 or can't think of any scenarios for #3 where the plan would change, then the testing is generally unnecessary.

In medicine, I've seen this as a form of laziness or greed, so I am always suspicious. But there is not always bad motive. Sometimes the person newly involved does want new/different information. Sometimes they don't trust the previous results (in this case, my arrogance radar starts blipping but it's not a 100% specific thing). You just need more information to make a judgement about this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Linda and Letitia, thank you. I literally had a first appointment with him 3 days after DD was diagnosed. The questions you mentioned were helpful, and I will ask. When his officer manager called to inform me insurance wouldn't cover the cost of the test, I was caught off-guard and I was unprepared as he never mentioned additional evaluations. He did give me a questionnaire with a very detailed and comprehensive history for her past and current symptoms. Surely, this document (that had typos) doesn't warrant me to pay $750! Before I hand that paperwork over on Friday, I'll ask him specific questions. Truth be told, the longer I think about him, the more wary I become. I just want my DD to have some good, comforting CBT, ya know?

This is neither here nor there: Linda, I recall from earlier discussions your daughter is gifted as well. We'll IQ test my DD after she turns 6. I think that is another puzzle piece that can help us as best meet her needs and understand her, as well as give us flexibility for her education. Right now the plan is to homeschool. We went in opposite professional order: you parented a 2E, then became a teacher. I taught first, then became a parent. My teaching experience has in no-way benefited me on this road with my child.....

Glad I can ask the community here.
 

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We weren't able to get a good IQ test in until my DD was 13 because she just wouldn't cooperate before then. Every one who worked with her agreed that she didn't have a cognitive impairment, but we really didn't know she was so bright. I just did my best to meet her needs as we went along, but a lot of it felt fumbling.


I'm starting to doubt if raising a child with special needs prepared me at all to teach! The kids are great, but the random school BS is just... well... you know.
 
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