Mothering Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thoroughly enjoyed the "Benefits of CLW" thread and found it so inspiring. But my question is less about the benefits of *extended breastfeeding* and more about the benefits of *letting the child determine the course that weaning takes.* I am committed to doing this and have, in fact, never refused a request to nurse; sometimes I offer it, too. But my dd (28m) is going through a phase just now of needing to nurse A LOT whenever I am home, and for a long time. She will nurse a bit, then sit up and go get a toy, then come back, then get up and get something else, come back, etc. It is kind of funny, but once in a while I'm noticing it is wearing on me. I need some inspiration about the benefits to her, psychologically and/or emotionally, of the child being able to wind down the nursing relationship on her terms.

Thanks for any wisdom folks can offer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
Hello there! You "look" familiar...

For me/us, there have been many, many benefits to following Maya's lead.

-- In almost everything as she gets more independent there is always that delightful conflict of thrill and fear for her; when I used to bring up her not nursing in her 2's and 3's I was met with a MASSIVE need to nurse on her part. That was my answer: Don't take it away from me! (Even though frequently her words were very open to the idea of cutting back.) It's in this realm that I discovered the "yes nah-nah" day was my answer to what to do if I was feeling totally nursed out, losing my mind with how much she wanted to nurse. Usually on the "yes nah-nah" days she nursed dramatically LESS, though she'd "test" a lot (to see if I'd REALLY drop whatever I was doing IMMEDIATELY to nurse).

-- I think it's been a great tool to help her know she knows what she needs. She knows if she's hungry, she knows if she feels safe, she knows if she's tired. If she tells me she needs to nurse (and doesn't agree that a snack or drink might do the trick), she KNOWS. It has added to our trust bond and to her self-awareness.

-- I have to add this one, though I don't think it *really* applied until the last 6 months or so... Following Maya's lead has also included teaching her that respecting other people's boundaries (when Mommy just can't deal with one more tweaked nipple, fer chrimeny's sake!!!). But, knowing that she knows I WILL respond if she REALLY "needs" to nurse (and this in our world includes just an emotional need) but that my needs are equally important has been really good.

-- I just asked her, "why do you think it's good for a mommy to follow their child's lead in nursing?" She said, "because it makes the child feel good."

I think that sums it up pretty well.

There are lots more things to say, but Maya's up WAY too late and we gotta go nurse to sleep. :)

--Heather
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Heather,

Yep, it's me--on the ole nursing jag once again! Thank you so much for these wonderful points. They are incredibly helpful to hear. And I just love that Maya is so articulate about her needs with you. What a special gal she is.

THANKS to the both of you for the wisdom!

Jen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,375 Posts
One I never thought I would need or experience is that she has kept the milk supply intact for my newborn who was born critically ill and can not breastfeed. She helped me bring in and maintain a good supply while he was in NICU and now home very ill and needing to be tube fed. She may very well have saved his life because the stress may have caused my milk to dry up otherwise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow, momuveight2b--that's probably the best reason ever to clw! Thanks for sharing your story.

Just bumping this thread--and clarifying the title so that the topic is clearer!

Thanks,
Jen
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top