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Just wondering what everyones best recipe is. Also i am particularly interested in ones that do not cook the turkey at high temperatures

edit: im thinking a temperature gradient might work the best. Like cook it at the normal temperature (350 or so) for the first hour or so to seal the outside, then drop the temperature too cook it longer and more slowly.
 

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i'm using this recipe: Simple Recipe.

here's the relelvant part:

Quote:
Put the turkey in the oven. Check the cooking directions on the turkey packaging. Gourmet turkeys often don't take as long to cook. With the turkeys mom gets, she recommends cooking time of about 15 minutes for every pound. For the 15 lb turkey, start the cooking at 400 F for the first 1/2 hour. Then reduce the heat to 350 F for the next 2 hours. Then reduce the heat further to 225 F for the next hour to hour and a half.

If you want the breast to be browned as well, you can turn over the bird for the last 15-20 minutes of cooking, at an oven temp of 300°F.
i'm trying to work it out with my poundage though. i have a 13 lb bird. that's 3 hours and 15 minutes for the turkey. the 15 lb takes 4 hours, and so there's a 45 minute difference. since there are three gradients, i figured that i would either cut 15 mintues form each one, or cut 30 minutes form the second and 15 from the third.

it's an idea anyway.

this is the recipe that i'm doing. for whatever reason the one in NT didn't 'speak' to me. but, this one did--so that's what i'm doing.
 

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I'm not big on recipes, really.

I roast a whole chicken almost every Friday afternoon- sometimes I just put the chicken in plain, other times I put some fresh spices (onion, ginger, garlic, bay leaves, dill, parsley etc- not ALL of them each time but whatever i'm in the mood for.) in the pan with the bird and baste it occasionally.

For the turkey, I'll do pretty much the same thing except that it will cook for a LOT longer! I usually roast my turkey at 325 so it cooks more slowly and evenly. Tomorrow I'll probably use onion, garlic, ginger, celery, and sage in with the bird. I cover it in foil for the first few hours, then take the foil off and baste it for the last hour or so to get the skin nice and crisp. This also eliminates the need to add water when first basting, as the natural juices will come out by the time I'm ready for basting (though I'll add more liquid if needed.)

After dinner, we cut the meat off the bones, put the meat in the fridge and the bones go in my big stock pot with whatever drippings never made it into the gravy, water and vinegar and I let it simmer overnight.
 

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Brine it! It makes a huge difference, the meat stays much more moist and has more flavor. Google turkey brine recipes, I don't have time to type it out.
 

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: Our turkey just came in yesterday and was frozen solid. the back is still frozen today so I decided to brine it to help it thaw. I'm doing a honey clove brine that I think will go good with the honey pecan cranberry pie that ds is making this year.

My "yeah that" was for the brine suggestion. though fried turkeys are yuuuummmmmy too!
 

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I am experiementing this year. I am following the salted turkey method in the current issue of Cook's Illustrated. Brining has always seemed like a hassle, so I've never done it. This seemed like a happy compromise.
 

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I too recommend brining. It's the best thing for making a good turkey. My favorite turkey recipe is just a brined turkey, cooked breast down with an orange and some onions and a half a stick of butter in the cavity cooked at 325 degrees F until done. I turn it over and broil for a few minutes to brown the skin over the breast. The onions and orange make it smell really good and with the butter makes great drippings for the gravy -- just combine grease from drippings with flour into a paste and stir in juices and some broth.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by gardenmommy View Post
sara, out of curiosity, why do you add the butter? Do you find that there aren't enough drippings? Is it for the flavor?
It does make more drippings, and the butter flavor is so good. I love that NT gives you a license to have lots of butter.
 
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