Mothering Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I was womdering that after I finish some books and if I have questions that you can help me understand? Anyway, I have a couple of questions about this book. it kind of feels like dumb questions.

1. The author talked about organised sports and dance. Saying that the movements aren't natural like repetiously etc. (Like in ballet it's not natural to dance on the toes or kicking in soccer)
what if your child wants to be in them? I mean we can never do any organised sports?

2 overstimulation. Fairs, malls children's activities etc. Again what if they want to go? I mean my son loves going places in the car. He is always wanting to go yo JC Pennys or Target or Barnes and Nobles.

Do I discourage all of this? Tha KS guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,831 Posts
Well, it depends on the age of the child.

My grandson is in a Waldorf School. He started playing soccer when he was 11 or so.

I wouldn't take an infant into a mall or big box store unless there was no alternative. I might take a toddler once in a while, if I needed something. A nine or ten year old is a different matter. You certainly don't want that to be their main habitat, but they don't need to be totally deprived of the modern world! Healthy environments for children evolve as they grow older and their ability to cope changes as they grow older.

How deep into the Waldorf approach you want to go is up to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, it depends on the age of the child.

My grandson is in a Waldorf School. He started playing soccer when he was 11 or so.

I wouldn't take an infant into a mall or big box store unless there was no alternative. I might take a toddler once in a while, if I needed something. A nine or ten year old is a different matter. You certainly don't want that to be their main habitat, but they don't need to be totally deprived of the modern world! Healthy environments for children evolve as they grow older and their ability to cope changes as they grow older.

How deep into the Waldorf approach you want to go is up to you.
Thank you. My son is almost 4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,143 Posts
I agree. It depends how "Steiner" you want to be. And the age and temperament of the child.

I'm not a huge fan of organised sport for a variety of reasons but both my girls have attended "Steiner-inspired" ballet classes. And I know children at her school who attend gymnastics and do other sports. I personally would not be the one to suggest or initiate sport but if they were genuinely keen then I wouldn't forbid them from participating.

My younger DD in particular found busy, crowded places like markets and festivals overwhelming before she turned three. Now she can tolerate short excursions.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: Deborah

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,831 Posts
Thank you. My son is almost 4.
An almost 4 year old does need some sheltering from the modern world. He also needs to feel that his parents are in charge and that they set the boundaries of his world.

I'd read some more about Waldorf to see if it really fits you and your family and then decide where to go with it.

Another, related approach that might be helpful is Simplicity Parenting. http://www.simplicityparenting.com/

My daughter worked with this approach and it really works well, especially for boys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,831 Posts
One more resource that has nothing to do with Steiner or Waldorf, but is important in terms of parents taking charge rather than letting marketers bring up your kids. http://www.commercialfreechildhood.org/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
An almost 4 year old does need some sheltering from the modern world. He also needs to feel that his parents are in charge and that they set the boundaries of his world.

I'd read some more about Waldorf to see if it really fits you and your family and then decide where to go with it.

Another, related approach that might be helpful is Simplicity Parenting. http://www.simplicityparenting.com/

My daughter worked with this approach and it really works well, especially for boys.
I have read Simplicity Parenting. That was what brought me to Waldorf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,831 Posts
I have read Simplicity Parenting. That was what brought me to Waldorf.
Neat!

Enjoy the path and see where it leads you. If something doesn't feel workable, don't force it.

good luck and enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I agree. It depends how "Steiner" you want to be. And the age and temperament of the child.

I'm not a huge fan of organised sport for a variety of reasons but both my girls have attended "Steiner-inspired" ballet classes. And I know children at her school who attend gymnastics and do other sports. I personally would not be the one to suggest or initiate sport but if they were genuinely keen then I wouldn't forbid them from participating.

My younger DD in particular found busy, crowded places like markets and festivals overwhelming before she turned three. Now she can tolerate short excursions.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
What is Stiener inspired ballet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,143 Posts
It's a ballet class where the teacher uses stories to teach the poses and dances instead of just demonstrating them and then practicing. So, for example, when she wants them to sit with the soles of their feet together and and do arm stretches they sit in a circle and put "sticky glue" on their feet to keep them together. And then she tells a story about reaching up to pick a star (stretch up), put it in the centre (stretch forward) etc. She also uses props like giant felt flowers or clouds etc to practice jumping and pointing toes and things.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It's a ballet class where the teacher uses stories to teach the poses and dances instead of just demonstrating them and then practicing. So, for example, when she wants them to sit with the soles of their feet together and and do arm stretches they sit in a circle and put "sticky glue" on their feet to keep them together. And then she tells a story about reaching up to pick a star (stretch up), put it in the centre (stretch forward) etc. She also uses props like giant felt flowers or clouds etc to practice jumping and pointing toes and things.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
wow. That's uniauic
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top