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This will be my 4th birth - but first time doing a water birth.
I'm planning on ordering my pool soon...and would like to know from experienced water birth mamas, which pool you find works best.
I want something that is easy on the budget...but also comfy & big enough to move around in. Should add...I'm in Canada - so I need something from a Canadian company so I'm not paying up the ass for shipping & duty!

Thanks ladies :)
 

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I am thinking about using a kiddie pool this time. Takes less time to fill (and empty) and the sides won't be so hard to climb over. Not sure if we would do a water delivery rather than just water labor - I would if GBS positive - but in the event we DO, a shallow tub seems more manageable than a deep pool.
 

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I've had 4 home births and for each one I used the fishy pool or kiddie pool. I wish I could give you a comparison but all I can say is that I'm about 5'10 and I had plenty of room to get in whatever position felt best for me. It happens to be the cheapest option as well.I got the liner for easy clean up. Although, I wasn't tune one doing the clean up lol!
 

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I have used a plastic (not Rubbermaid brand because it had too many ridges/bumps) stock tank, modified for comfort (instructions online) for my first home birth and a La Bassine birth pool with liner for my second. I thought I'd like the rigidity of the stock tank, and while it was nice, I had underestimated how sturdy the birth pool was, especially with the handles on the inside. While the depth of the stock tank was nice, it was hard to maneuver and didn't insulate well. The LaBassine was still plenty deep for me--actually a better level for nursing until placenta birthed than the deeper stock tank. I plan on using my midwife's La Bassine again for this birth--it was very comfortable.

a quick search brought this result from a Canadian birth supply seller:
http://www.midwiferysupplies.ca/blogs/ancient-midwifery-blog/3064932-choosing-a-birth-pool
 

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I used a birth pool in a box last time .. borrowed it, and it was nice .. but kind of too deep for me, hard to get into and hard to keep my head above water on my hands/knees and the little bench on the side just irritated me cause i didn't fit on it .. so this time i got a fishy pool, 24" deep vs the 30" pool i had last time .. i need to blow it up to make sure it holds air and everything as the reviews said some of them don't work right out of the box, but it was $27 on amazon vs over 200 for the 'real' birth pool .. and i really think it will work better for us.. and for the 27$ i'm not planning to get a liner, just throw the whole thing out if it is messy.
 

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We used a fishy pool for the last birth. It was nice, but I don't want it again this time. For one, I really like depth, and the fishy pool was HUGE by the time it was deep enough to be comfortable for me. Plus the first one deflated overnight, so we went out and got another one. We still struggled with the top ring deflating throughout labor. Even if it had stayed inflated, it just wasn't sturdy enough for me. There was nothing to lean on and the whole time I felt really unsupported. The fact that the pool was several feet wide didn't help. It worked, it was cheap, and it drained easily, but I don't want that again.

This time we're going to opt for 110 gal stock tank. My dad, the hillbilly bachelor that he is, uses these for outdoor baths and cooling during the summer, and I just love them. There's nothing more relaxing than jumping into a stock tank with a jack and coke after mowing a half acre in August. I have heard of women putting a beanbag chair and a liner in them and then sitting on the bean bag while it's filling so that it will be shaped properly. The plus side is also that they're not just huge. We intend to put it in our living room, something we would not be able to do with a fishy pool.

I think for myself I'll either use the tank as-is (or maybe painted for visibility) or possibly pad just the bottom with a blanket and use a liner. I'm sure the bean bag chair is nice, but I feel like it would take up too much space and I already find just the tank itself to be quite comfortable. That's also why I'm on the fence about padding. The things are just so dang easy to drain as-is, and a liner would complicate that a bit. But I'm sure when I'm kneeling and pushing out a baby, I might appreciate padding on the bottom a bit more than when I'm just cooling off with an adult beverage.

Actually... I think we're going to buy that tank in the next few weeks. Holy cow, I can't get cool with this tiny heater growing inside of me. I would love to use that tub RIGHT NOW.
 

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We used to swim in those when we were kids! Good memories. Can your floor support 110 gal. of water, that's heavy?!
 

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I've always been told that if your floor could handle a large aquarium, it can handle a birth pool. I guess we'll find out!

Actually, I had thought about this as our house is a fixer-upper and there are plenty of weak spots in the floors. However the largest expanse of floorspace in the living room is not one of those places with weak spots, it's probably the most sturdy floor space in the house.

If our house had not been in such bad shape, it wouldn't worry me at all. Your floor holds you, your roughhousing children, your pets, your furniture, your refrigerator, you washing machine. It will hold you and your birth tub while you labor just fine. Houses are sturdier than you think.

And if I'm wrong? Then I guess I'll get free installation of a sunken tub in my living room. :lol


Also: I don't think a 110 gal tank is as big as you think it is. It's about the size of a small but deep bathtub. Fishy pools hold more water.
 

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We swam in some kind of stock tank, but it wasn't ours & your right, I have no idea how big; 110gal just sounds heavy. 1 gal.=8 lbs. sooo 880 lb. That's not bad. We've lived in our (modular) house for 5 years & put a wood stove & gun safe on one side of the house, about 800 lbs. altogether. Our house is slowly but noticeably separating a bit on the marriage line. But 1 week or night vs. 5 yrs. oughtn't to matter at all.
 

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Yeah, but once you account for the water I will displace with my 200+ pound body, it will be much less than 110 gallons as well, maybe half that.
 

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Building codes require floors to be able to support a certain number of pounds per square foot. We are in a multi-story building with neighbors beneath, so the prospect of a collapsing floor during birth is nightmarish. Check your building codes; we found that recent construction in California, anyway, should support a decent-sized birth pool with a person in it. In the abstract the numbers seemed close, so I thought back to our largest house parties and felt reassured that our floors could handle the weight ;-) You can keep the pool near a load-bearing wall or structure rather than out in the middle of a floor, since that should improve the average numbers.
 
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