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I was just thinking about something recently and wondered what people around here thought--I'm vegan, and plan on raising my baby vegan. In spite of whatever people might think of that, I am wondering that if at whatever point I stop or at least decrease actually <i>breastfeeding</i> for whatever reason (i.e. around 12-16 months)--is it still OK to feed the baby/toddler expressed breast milk from a cup in addition to solid foods, since most people would probably start kids on <i>dairy</i> milk at a certain age (i.e. around 1?) which I won't be doing? Is there any risks to feeding older infants/young toddlers breast milk or is it good for them? Sorry for all the newbie q's <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> and thanks in advance.<br><br>
eta: whoops, no italics in titles <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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yes, yes, oh yes. IF you stop breastfeeding at one year (and don't be so sure you will - I am still going strong at one year and plan to nurse for at least another year - that's how wonderful it is!) but IF you stop at one year it would be GREAT to feed you baby breastmilk from a cup. Much better to use a cup than a bottle which could cause nipple confusion early on.<br><br>
congratulations<br><br>
I wanted to add that there was a link floating around for a while about the benefits of breastfeeding AFTER a year - maybe someone will post it for you . . .
 

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Why waste time with a cup when they are fully capable of drinking straight from the tap???<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"><br><br>
Cups are for other drinks when they are old enough: water, juice, rice "milk", whatever. We don't do much cow milk here regardless.
 

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Once you reach 12-16 months, your dc might not be eating a bunch of solids, even if you offer all the time. For me, as this is the case for us, if I were not bfing, I would really really question his nutrient intake. We're vegan too, so no dairy or any other milks. I wouldn't bother with a cup either. Like a pp said, that is good for water or smoothies or veggie juices. Hope that helps, and feel free to ask me any questions! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Mary
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>amyleigh33</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7259397"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am wondering that if at whatever point I stop or at least decrease actually <i>breastfeeding</i> for whatever reason (i.e. around 12-16 months)--</div>
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Why would you decrease nursing around that age? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/confused.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Confused">: And then why would you want to put so much more work into pumping rather than just nursing? Really doesn't make much sense. Do it the easy way and let the child nurse until they're done.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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my baby is 13 months and im always amazed that he is considered to be breastfeeding beyond infancy! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> he is so small and still gets 95% of his nutrition from bm.<br><br>
i agree w/ others though....isnt the WHO guidelines until 2 years? but even past 2, there are definite health benefits (to baby and mom).<br><br>
good luck!<br><br>
rach
 

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i am bfing my 15 month old and just like my 2 other bf babies she will stop when she is ready.i bf the other 2 until they were 3 yrs old,no pumps no bottles no cups,just good old fashioned nips,and bonding beyond infancy.<br>
breast is best even past 2
 

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If a child weans, there's absolutely no harm in giving them expressed milk in a cup. However, like others have mentioned, it seems like a lot of work to express and cup feed unless there's a good reason (toddler weaned prematurely, you are separated due to work, etc). In any case, my 16 month old probably takes in more total breastmilk now than he did 6 months ago (sue to being heavier!), so I wouldn't bet on decreasing the amount you nurse in early toddlerhood unless you plan on actively weaning (and most peopele who actively wean at that age do it because they don't think breastmilk is an iportant part of a child's diet, so they usually aren't expressing it for them).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Meiri</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7259530"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Why waste time with a cup when they are fully capable of drinking straight from the tap???<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"><br><br>
Cups are for other drinks when they are old enough: water, juice, rice "milk", whatever. We don't do much cow milk here regardless.</div>
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Whoops, perhaps I should have made it more clear in the original post--<i>the tap</i>--has to go to work at some point, but not until at least after a year or more, so rather than replacing breastfeeding with a bottle/formula/dairy I wondered if around 16 months feeding expressed breast milk in addition to other foods would be OK?<br><br>
I wasn't trying to offend anyone; it's not that I don't want to continue, it's that it won't necessarily be an option because I will have to get some part-time work on dp's off-hours and <i>he</i> can't b/f the baby! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Eh, toddlers can get in a lot of their nursing when mama is home.<br><br>
Also most women have a lot of trouble pumping very much with toddlers. It's not an easy thing.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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Amy, you can totally continue with breastmilk in any form for as long as you want! My son refused to drink expressed milk at all because of some special issues we had, but my SIL had a huge stash of milk from going back to work and even after her son weaned at 17 months (she was pg with #2) she still mixed the remaining milk into his cereals and such until it was all gone.<br><br>
Breastmilk is so great for children well beyond a year and continuing to nurse and\or to pump and give that when you are away is a wonderful gift for your child.
 

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There's no reason you couldn't give him expressed milk in a cup or bottle. Even working full-time, though, you may find that the nursing relationship resumes when you walk through the door at the end of the day!
 

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I just wanted to add that you might want to go to La Leche League meets now before the baby? ( Or did you have the baby?) There you will see different moms and babies. It will help you get a good handel on what you want to do with her/him. And a good start. Also the baby gets old then you can make up your mind about cups and all the other stuff. But the most imporatant thing is the longer you baby gets your milk the better.
 

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Your milk will never lose its nutrition and stop being "good" for the child, so whatever way you can get it to him is AOK for as long as you can keep it going. Some people breastfeed until age 5, 6 or older. Most mammals start shedding their "milk teeth" around the age of weaning; humans don't lose their "milk teeth" (baby teeth) until around 5 or 6. Many kids wean naturally before that, however.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>amyleigh33</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7264528"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Whoops, perhaps I should have made it more clear in the original post--<i>the tap</i>--has to go to work at some point, but not until at least after a year or more, so rather than replacing breastfeeding with a bottle/formula/dairy I wondered if around 16 months feeding expressed breast milk in addition to other foods would be OK?<br><br>
I wasn't trying to offend anyone; it's not that I don't want to continue, it's that it won't necessarily be an option because I will have to get some part-time work on dp's off-hours and <i>he</i> can't b/f the baby! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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Lots of working moms are able to breastfeed when they are home and during the night. Giving some expressed milk when you're gone and feeding from the tap when you are home is great way to maintain that special bond after returning to work--plus, toddlers still benefit from the immunities they get from mom when breastfeeding (they don't get the full effect with expressed milk).
 

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I'd say get the breastmilk into the baby for however long you can, whatever way works best. I personally know dd refused EBM in any form (after trying at 9m). But, if your dc is eating more solids I think some organic o's with EBM would be a great snack!!!<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>amyleigh33</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7264528"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Whoops, perhaps I should have made it more clear in the original post--<i>the tap</i>--has to go to work at some point, but not until at least after a year or more, so rather than replacing breastfeeding with a bottle/formula/dairy I wondered if around 16 months feeding expressed breast milk in addition to other foods would be OK?<br><br>
I wasn't trying to offend anyone; it's not that I don't want to continue, it's that it won't necessarily be an option because I will have to get some part-time work on dp's off-hours and <i>he</i> can't b/f the baby! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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Yup, I think that would be the best way to do it. Each child is different, though, and you may find you don't need to provide bm while you're gone. Around 11-12 months, my dd dropped to nursing 3-4 times/day -- morning, nap, bedtime, during the night (of course one still had to be in the middle of the night!). She did it all on her own, and no matter how often I offered and tried to get her to nurse, that is what she stuck to. Now at 18 months, she rarely nurses more than twice a day (and by "nurse", I mean bring a letdown ... she will nurse at other times during the day, but it's for 20 seconds, and then she's off and running again). I'm a SAHM, and am more than happy to let her nurse whenever she wants, but she just is not interested <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">. (BTW, although she didn't start on solids until 9 months, she is a really good eater, and eats a lot of solids with a very varied diet.) OTOH, my friend's 19 month old would still nurse once an hour if mama was willing <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">. So you'll have to see what kind of nurser you end up with, and then take it from there <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.
 

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AH!! Thanks for the clarification Amy! Everyone's covered that yes, you can of course give your milk in a cup when not with your child. Now your question makes more sense!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
There was no offence, just puzzlement on my part.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">isnt the WHO guidelines until 2 years? but even past 2, there are definite health benefits (to baby and mom).</td>
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WHO's guideline is At Least two years, not "until". Big difference.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> In 2005, AAP even published a statement that there's no harm nursing to the third year and beyond if mutually desired. Even they get it correct sometimes, wish all their members would keep up.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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I started back at work when my baby was 1 year and I pump once during the day, she gets that before & after her nap, and I nurse her in the morning, when I get home, at bedtime, and a few (too many <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: ) times during the night.
 

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My baby (only 12 months now though) gets breastmilk in a cup while I'm at work. Certianly no harm, in fact you'll be amazed how young and small and squishy and baby-ish they still are during the 2nd year.
 
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