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Hi. I just discovered this discussion board. Wow--there seems to be a wealth of information here about breastfeeding-- maybe you have some suggestions for me too.<br><br>
I am a stay at home mom with a six month old boy. For the first 4-5mo I struggled with low milk supply and even had to supplement with formula (believe me I didn't want to! but after seeing the LC and trying everything I had no choice) I received acupuncture and regular chiropractic adjustments and my milk supply has finally increased so that he doesn't seem to need the supplement anymore.<br><br>
Also my son has been teething since 3 mo old. Can you believe he now has 5 teeth! This has caused him some considerable discomfort including an ear inflammation/infection (his doctor says it has cleared up now). And he is still drooling so there must be more coming!<br><br>
Anyway, he has always had very intense breastfeeding needs. Sometimes have been more intense than others--nursing all night long or all day long while other times I have been able to get sleep (a 4-5hour stretch!) and attend moms' group or baby class without problem (actually do something besides breastfeed all day!). (I think he might be considered a high need baby since he wants to be held a lot too.)<br><br>
Lately, he does his usual nursing/sleepy signal (rubbing his head back and forth across my chest) and when I put him across my lap to nurse him he gets mad (and boy does this little guy have a temper!) so I try to distract him and play with him but the cycle eventually repeats! I wondered if he was tired of being in our bedroom (I have been nursing him almost exclusively sitting up on our bed lately --it is the most comfortable for those marathon nursing sessions and since most of the time he won't let me move him off of me once he falls asleep) and tried going elsewhere to nurse but he still got mad! Finally I put him in his sling and walked around the house and when I took him out he nursed to sleep. Any ideas or suggestions why? or what I could do differently?<br><br>
The other thing he does is when he gets hungry and there are other people present at home or in public (sometimes even my husband!) he will nurse a few minutes and then unlatch and look around. Minutes later he is signalling again (usually a stronger signal like whining) and I will try to nurse him again and then (if I can get him to latch on again--sometimes I can't) he willl unlatch himself again. This cycle continues until he gets mad (with screaming!) and finally nurses or until I remove him to a more private place if it is possible. Any ideas or suggestions?<br><br>
Finally, I have some food intolerances (wheat and dairy) and because of this his doctor wanted me to wait 6 mo to introduce solids. Well we are at the 6 mo mark now and I first tried bananas but by day three he was noticeably more gassy and had swollen eyes so I of course stopped giving them to him. Anyway, my son's doctor is on vacation and the doctor covering for her said to just try another food on the list (I have a list of foods he can try after 6 mo - (applesauce,pearsauce,avocados....). This sounds reasonable except I remember his doctor said that he could exclusively breastfeed for 9 mo and I am starting to wonder if I shouldn't wait for 9 months. But She encouraged me to start now (at 6 mo)-- he would be more satisfied if he started eating solids (maybe even sleep better, nurse less?) plus he is very interested always reaching and grabbng at my food. (When I started with bananas he ate a whole half banana in one sitting!) But now I am wondering if the reason for this allergy is the formula that he drank. Do you think that his intestines is mature enough for solid food even though I supplemented with formula? I guess I just didn't expect a reaction when I waited 6 months and certainly not to the first food I tried. Does anyone have any similar experiences? Do you think I should just wait 9 months and start then?<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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He sounds so much like my dd at that age...nursing often, sometimes constantly (these "frequency days" are absolutely a *normal* part of nursing)<br>
and getting annoyed at distractions sometimes is normal too...<br><br>
About the solids:<br><br>
I feel strongly that the concept that starting solids at 6 months will magically help a child sleep longer is a myth. If the food is lower in calories/fat than breast milk (such as cereals or fruits) the child might wake hungrier more often. Also the child might wake more often if the food disagrees with their tummy.<br><br>
Here are some references:<br><br><a href="http://www.drjaygordon.com/faqs/cerjuic.htm" target="_blank">http://www.drjaygordon.com/faqs/cerjuic.htm</a><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Breastmilk is excellent (not just "adequate" as some doctors say) nutrition for the first 12 months of life....It's fun to feed fruits and vegetables to babies over six months of age but far from essential....Whatever you do, don't let anyone convince you that your milk is "not enough" for your baby in the second half of the first year.</td>
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Jay Gordon, MD, IBCLC<br><br><a href="http://www.askdrsears.com/faq/bf4.asp" target="_blank">http://www.askdrsears.com/faq/bf4.asp</a><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><br>
"My eight-month-old still does not seem interested in solids. I am breastfeeding, and he is gaining weight well. I am worried that my breast milk is not enough for him. Does he need the solid foods for complete nutrition at this age?"<br><br>
I encounter this situation frequently in my office. Many parents have the misconception that all infants will be ready for foods between 4 and 6 months of age. The truth is that very few infants are developmentally ready at 4 months. In addition, it is now recommended to delay foods until 6 months in order to decrease the chance of allergies. I also have found that some infants are not developmentally ready for solids until 8 or 9 months. You can click here to read about what signs to watch for to determine when your infant is ready for foods. Breast milk is nutritionally complete for at least the first year of life. This means that infants can go for at least a year on breast milk alone, without eating any foods, and be nutritionally complete. Offering foods between 6 and 12 months of age is simply for social development and to get infants used to eating.<br><br>
I encourage parents not to try to coax their 6 month old into accepting solids before he shows many of the signs of being ready. This can create a picky eater and negative feelings about eating.</td>
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Bob Sears, MD<br><br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/solids-when.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/so...lids-when.html</a><br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids/delay-solids.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/so...ay-solids.html</a><br>
" For some babies, delaying solids longer than six months can be a good thing; for example, some doctors may recommend delaying solids for 12 months if there is a family history of allergies."
 

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PS I found this article on being a burned out mom...I related to it and am printing it for myself! Maybe something in it will be useful<br><br><a href="http://www.lalecheleague.org/NB/NBMayJun01p84.html" target="_blank">http://www.lalecheleague.org/NB/NBMayJun01p84.html</a><br><br><br>
This one is nice too! About feeling "touched out" from carrying/nursing a baby all day<br><a href="http://www.todaysparent.com/lifeasparent/motherhood/article.jsp?content=5775" target="_blank">http://www.todaysparent.com/lifeaspa...p?content=5775</a>
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>margaritamama</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am a stay at home mom with a six month old boy.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greet.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greet"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">For the first 4-5mo I struggled with low milk supply and even had to supplement with formula (believe me I didn't want to! but after seeing the LC and trying everything I had no choice) I received acupuncture and regular chiropractic adjustments and my milk supply has finally increased so that he doesn't seem to need the supplement anymore.</td>
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Good for you for being persistent! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Also my son has been teething since 3 mo old. Can you believe he now has 5 teeth! This has caused him some considerable discomfort including an ear inflammation/infection (his doctor says it has cleared up now). And he is still drooling so there must be more coming!</td>
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All 3 of mine had a terrible time teething. It was a nightmare.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Anyway, he has always had very intense breastfeeding needs. Sometimes have been more intense than others--nursing all night long or all day long while other times I have been able to get sleep (a 4-5hour stretch!) and attend moms' group or baby class without problem (actually do something besides breastfeed all day!). (I think he might be considered a high need baby since he wants to be held a lot too.)</td>
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2 of my 3 are high needs and one is spunky. Have you read <b>The Fussy Baby Book</b> and <b>Raising Your Spirited Child</b> yet?<b>The Baby Book</b> by Dr Sears is excellent too.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Lately, he does his usual nursing/sleepy signal (rubbing his head back and forth across my chest) and when I put him across my lap to nurse him he gets mad (and boy does this little guy have a temper!) so I try to distract him and play with him but the cycle eventually repeats! I wondered if he was tired of being in our bedroom... Finally I put him in his sling and walked around the house and when I took him out he nursed to sleep. Any ideas or suggestions why? or what I could do differently?</td>
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You are doing a good job reading your baby's cues. Nursing on older baby is different than nursing a little one. Nursing, which used to be his whole universe, is now only part of it. Soothing him by walking around is a very good addition to your parenting repetoire. Even dad (if you have a partner) can do this. In nice weather, a walk outside in the sling is good too. Giving a bath, bathing together, some quiet playtime, a massage with lavender oil or lotion, a book, songs, etc., are other good bedtime activities.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The other thing he does is when he gets hungry and there are other people present at home or in public ...I remove him to a more private place if it is possible. Any ideas or suggestions?</td>
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Being distractable while nursing is more or less universal in a baby this age. Going to a quiet private spot, even with shades drawn, is sometimes the only solution.<br><br>
If you can't do this, nursing in a sling with the sides drawn up around his head might help a little to reduce distractions. You can stand up and sway while you do it.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Finally, I have some food intolerances (wheat and dairy) and because of this his doctor wanted me to wait 6 mo to introduce solids. Well we are at the 6 mo mark now and I first tried bananas but by day three he was noticeably more gassy and had swollen eyes so I of course stopped giving them to him.</td>
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The first taste of solid food should be only that, a taste. Less than a tsp. Giving a half a banana the first day was going a bit overboard. It can take some time for a person used to a liquid diet, to build up enzymes neccessary to digest solid food.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Anyway, my son's doctor is on vacation and the doctor covering for her said to just try another food on the list (I have a list of foods he can try after 6 mo - (applesauce,pearsauce,avocados....). This sounds reasonable except I remember his doctor said that he could exclusively breastfeed for 9 mo and I am starting to wonder if I shouldn't wait for 9 months. But She encouraged me to start now (at 6 mo)-- he would be more satisfied if he started eating solids (maybe even sleep better, nurse less?)</td>
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The dr on call is wrong, as Twicemom shows. Some babies are not ready for much in the way of solid foods for 12-18 mos! They are individuals, not statistics. Watch your baby.<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">plus he is very interested always reaching and grabbng at my food.</td>
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Babies this age are grabby for everything. Try giving him a spoon to play with. If he really wants food, just let him have a tiny bit to begin with and increase very gradually. If he has an allergic reaction, stop. If this means you have to sneak eat when he is not on your lap for a while, so be it.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">But now I am wondering if the reason for this allergy is the formula that he drank. Do you think that his intestines is mature enough for solid food even though I supplemented with formula?</td>
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No, I do not think there is a connection. It is more likely just his individual readiness timeclock.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I guess I just didn't expect a reaction when I waited 6 months and certainly not to the first food I tried. Does anyone have any similar experiences? Do you think I should just wait 9 months and start then?</td>
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Hopefully you now have more info to base your decisions on. I esp like the kellymom website...good luck!
 

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There's some excellent advice from the previous posters! I just wanted to add that my 4 month old ds behaves much the way you describe when trying to nurse. He was especially fussy while nursing when he had a recent ear infection (also while he was teething--I didn't make the connection till you pointed it out). I think that his ears may have hurt when laying down to nurse (he usually nurses in craddle hold or side-lying), so I sat him up to nurse, and that seemed to help. Another thing I've done pre-ear infection with success is walk around with him nursing. I'll hold him in cradle hold walk around for a few seconds to get him started, then often I can sit down with him.
 
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