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<a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18277795/" target="_blank">http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18277795/</a><br><br>
Of COURSE it doesn't, so make sure you run and get the anti-obesity formula.<br><br>
What perfect timing.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/splat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="splat"> :puke
 

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Okay, but I'd bet the study has some very serious flaws. How long were these babies bf? At what age were solids introduced? What is their diet like now? What is their activity level?<br><br>
Its obvious that bf doesn't provent obesity by itself, and anyone who thinks that is foolish. I mean just b/c someone was bf for two years doesn't mean they can go out and eat big macs and french fries without impunity. I think it would be better to say the exclusive bf for 6 months and continued on as long as desired is a TOOL to help fight obesity.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Caden's Mom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7937631"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Okay, but I'd bet the study has some very serious flaws. How long were these babies bf? At what age were solids introduced? What is their diet like now? What is their activity level?<br><br>
Its obvious that bf doesn't provent obesity by itself, and anyone who thinks that is foolish. I mean just b/c someone was bf for two years doesn't mean they can go out and eat big macs and french fries without impunity. I think it would be better to say the exclusive bf for 6 months and continued on as long as desired is a TOOL to help fight obesity.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap"><br><br>
There's way too many factors that they haven't accounted for.
 

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Exactly! I was born in the late 70's and was bf- but on a full solids diet around 8 months (started very early). I also know some women whose MIL's *claim* to have bf or done this or that, but their medical records and the family says differently. What they NEED is a group of women who were ebf for 6 months with a slow intro of solids (as we are supposed to do) and bf for at least a year.. and THEN see what the results are.
 

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Oh and how do they explain that the lowered risk of obesity was JUST reiterated:<br><a href="http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/tp/brfouttp.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/tp/brfouttp.htm</a>
 

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i think that one of the keys to bf'ing preventing obesity is that a bf'ed baby knows when to stop eating (when it is full). in contrast, formula-fed babies often get overfed because they are expected to meet some particular quota of oz per feed, or because there's "just a couple more drops" in the bottle, and it's easy to coax them in. so bf'ed babies are more able to control their hunger mechanisms and limit their intake, by default.<br><br>
however, i can see this value of bf'ing being completely voided once the child starts eating solids, and particularly into the toddler years, when there is frequently terrible pressure on children to eat foods they don't want or are too full to finish. now THERE is the key to obesity, bf'ed or not: overriding a child's innate ability to self-control their food intake. we destine our children for obesity when we force, urge, or praise them for eating, and thereby destroy their own sense of fullness. when children rely on external cues to tell them when to stop eating, bf'ed as babies or not-- they are certainly more likely become another statistic in our obesity crisis.<br><br>
of course, i would NEVER downplay the positive effects of bf'ing. i'm just saying that bf'ing is a great start against being overweight, but our babies need that same self-control over feeding well beyond the bf'ed weeks/months/years.<br><br>
-HCM<br><br>
"The idea of painless, nonthreatening coercion is an illusion."
 

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In my inexpert opinion, it would probably be very difficult to firmly establish an obesity connection to formula in comparison to nursing for short periods of time, especially if there was any formula supplementation.<br><br>
However, I vaguely remember reading once that fat cells are "laid down" at 18 months (I never really understood what this meant) but that gave me the vague idea that if nursing had any positive effect on healthy weight (beyond encouraging self-regulating food intake) that it probably has something to do with **extended** nursing having some sort of long term effect on metabolism.<br><br>
It's just a pet theory of mine and one of the things that encourages me to keep nursing my 2 3/4 year old.<br><br>
If anyone here has a good idea of what the "laying down" of fat cells is, I'd love to hear it.<br>
~Cath
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><b>Benefits don't include keeping kids from becoming fat adults, study says</b><br><br>
In 1989, the women were asked their height and weight and what those measurements were when they were children and at age 18. Then every two years, through 2001, they were asked to update their weight information. The surveyed women were all between 25 and 42 at the time of the 1989 questionnaires, Michels said.<br><br>
In 2001, the mothers of these women were sent a questionnaire asking if their daughters had been breast-fed and for how long.<br><br>
When possible, researchers checked medical records to confirm what the mothers and daughters recalled, but breast-feeding is not routinely documented. Still, the researchers believe the women’s recollections of breast-feeding are reliable.</td>
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That is not a study, that is a poll or survey! What did the sicentist actully study, survey sheets? WTH!?
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">“It would be remarkable to find a behavior that you engage in for one year of life and see detectable effects from it 40 years later,” said Grummer-Strawn, chief of the CDC’s maternal and child nutrition branch.</td>
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What about breastfeeding 3-4 years? I wonder if they even compared the length of time breastfed to see if that made any differance? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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I thought it was a pretty good article it didn't bash bfing in any way and it said that bfing does help prevent(except for one interviewee) childhood obesity which is an important part of lowering adult obeisty rates...... IDK it didn't say anywhere that you might as well not bf it said multipe times that ".....he said breast-feeding is beneficial for children, and the government’s health message should not change." in some way or another....
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CathMac</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7940618"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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If anyone here has a good idea of what the "laying down" of fat cells is, I'd love to hear it.<br>
~Cath</div>
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Fat cells are only made at certain times in a person's life. When an adult (who isn't pregnant, or experencing any other factors that cause fat cells to be created) gains weight the existing fat cells become larger, but new cells aren't created. There is a critical size over which they cannot grow larger and fat based weight becomes harder to gain once that threshold is reached for all the fat cells.<br>
I know childhood is a time of fat cell production, I can't remember about puberty (I think it is tho), and pregnancy is.
 

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I don't remember where I read it... (it was while I was pg), but I read that BM fat "sticks" differently than formula-fat, and BM fat is easier to lose in active toddlerhood, while formula-fed toddlers tend to hold on to their pudge/ stomach fat. Something about the chemical compounds and how they are used and processed in our bodies... and I've seen it in real life: fat boob babes lose it in toddlerhood/childhood, and all the FF babes I see just stay... big...
 

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They are absolutely right, breastfeeding does nothing against obesity, the sort of obesity caused by being carried in a reclining position all.day.long. Yep, infant carseat carriers have their valuable uses, but there's just something wrong that "tummy time" even had to be promoted.
 

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QUOTE=Synchro246;7943230]Fat cells are only made at certain times in a person's life. When an adult ... gains weight the existing fat cells become larger, but new cells aren't created. There is a critical size over which (fat cells) cannot grow larger and fat based weight becomes harder to gain once that threshold is reached for all the fat cells. ...<br><br>
I don't know if this has anything to do with anything but I thought that when fat cells "maxed out" that they divided. Which doesn't necessarily contradict what you are saying, but rather might explain how fat adults become obese if new fat cells usually aren't actually "created". In other words divided fat cells might somehow be different from those that are "created" or "laid down".<br><br>
My basic hunch still is that if a baby or toddler is nursing at the time the fat cells are created or "laid down” that perhaps it somehow affects the nature of those cells or even “programs” a more efficient metabolism.<br><br>
Of course, that's just a theory from a non expert.<br>
~Cath
 

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Wow, the AP showing once again how well it bows down to big pHARMa.<br><br>
A survey is not science, it's merely a pop-culture ritual that appeases certain special interest groups in Washington. And yes, how COMPLETELY ironic that this appears just after this anti-obesity formula. WOW!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: Amazing...decades of scientific fact, hundreds of documented studies...pigeonholed by some crackpot who did a telephone survey.
 

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I just put up my full response over at The Lactivist Blog (<a href="http://thelactivist.blogspot.com/2007/04/oops-guess-your-kids-are-gonna-get-fat.html" target="_blank">http://thelactivist.blogspot.com/200...a-get-fat.html</a>)<br><br>
Two things that I'd like to point out that I haven't seen mentioned here...<br><br>
Every last person in the study was a female nurse. 96% of them were white.<br><br>
So you not only have retrospective self-reported data, but you have it from a single race, a single gender and a single occupation.<br><br>
I'm sure that in no way impacts the results. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
Beyond that, wait until you see the chart that these nurses used to report their body type at ages 5, 10, 18 and through adulthood. They basically picked one of 8 graphical images that showed how thin or fat they were. Yes, it was matched up with weight and height when it was available from medical records, but seriously? Letting women pick an image that shows how thin or fat they are?<br><br>
yeah, that's going to wield accurate results...
 

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This made it into the AM-NY (NYC free paper) this morning. They even quoted one "expert" as saying, "I'd like to see any activity that you do only for a year affecting you 40 years later." As in, he disbelieves that there are any long-term effects from bf'ing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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No, ff can cause it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> 'Watch your language', right? (I love that article.)
 

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You know, it's funny, but when reading that article, I was thinking, "what's wrong with fat babies?" I guess I'm not referring to obese babies, but my bf'd babies have always looked round and plump, and I was under the impression that it was good for them to have a little fat storage as infants for healthy growth. (Could be wrong here....) Anyway, today my two DDs are active toddlers with no weight issues whatsoever.<br><br>
So my big thing about this new formula is how sad it is to give parents the message that their infants need to be skinny from the start - what a tremendous amount of pressure and investment their parents are putting into body weight and image. Even if the formula did what the makers promise, imagine the potential psychological effects for those kids as they grow up. Instead of letting little kids' bodies grow at a natural pace, those kids will always be scrutinized over their body shape and weight, and I wonder if they might be more prone to eating disorders later in life? Who knows...it is obviously too early to tell, but I think it's dangerous territory.
 
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