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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always had a hard time getting my milk to come in. It seems to take 3-4 days. Is there a way that I can "prep" my breasts to get the milk to come in earlier?<br>
Sorry if this is a stupid question, just wondering.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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Hm I thought that was normal for your milk to take a few days to come in? Definitely interested if someone knows a way to make it faster!
 

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It is normal for your milk to take from 1 to 6 days I believe to come in. After all your baby needs the colostrum first! Each of my babies it came in earlier and earlier. First took 4 days, 2nd took 2 1/2 days and the 3rd pregnancy it was 2 days.
 

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It's totally normal to take even up to 7 days! Most people find it comes in quicker in subsequent pregnancies, because your body knows what it's 'doing'.<br><br>
The best way is just to nurse, nurse, nurse, nurse that baby and offer NO pacfiers or bottles of formula. Baby should be doing all his/her sucking at the breast to stimulate supply! The more stimulation....the sooner milk will come.<br><br>
Once baby arrives, you could pump also if you have a baby who isn't interested much in suckling.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mommysusie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8148410"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have always had a hard time getting my milk to come in. It seems to take 3-4 days. Is there a way that I can "prep" my breasts to get the milk to come in earlier?<br>
Sorry if this is a stupid question, just wondering.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"></div>
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Why do you want to speed it up?
 

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Yeah, I'd also say that remember when you don't have 'milk' you have colostrum which is even better for baby than milk. The antibodies are more and the fat content is higher. Is there a specific reason you want your milk in quicker, otherwise I'd be happy to give baby colostrum
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lyttlewon</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8149978"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Why do you want to speed it up?</div>
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Because I was reading on another board and someone was saying that they were forced to supplement because the doctor said the baby wasn't getting enough. I remember that happening to me last time.<br>
Basically what happened was my girl twin went directly to the NICU in another hospital after birth. My Twin boy stayed with me. I was nursing him like crazy for the first day and the doctors kept telling me he wasn't getting enough and his body temperature kept dropping. They took him to the nursery for a while and one of the nurses gave him a bottle and he sucked it down like crazy. Well, the doctor thought I wasn't taking care of him and sent him to the NICU also. That really hurt me because I felt like failure even though I was doing all that I could do.<br>
Reading another Mama's story today triggered that memory and got me worried and I just don't want that to happen again this time. Maybe I am just paranoid, but I don't want to starve my baby either.
 

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This might help <a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/milkproduction.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/milkproduction.html</a><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Endocrine (Hormonal) Control of Milk Synthesis -- Lactogenesis I & II<br>
Milk production doesn’t start out as a supply and demand process. During pregnancy and the first few days postpartum, milk supply is hormonally driven – this is called the endocrine control system. Essentially, as long as the proper hormones are in place, mom will start making colostrum about halfway through pregnancy (Lactogenesis I) and her milk will increase in volume (Lactogenesis II) around 30-40 hours after birth.<br><br>
During the latter part of pregnancy, the breasts are making colostrum, but high levels of progesterone inhibit milk secretion and keep the volume “turned down”. At birth, the delivery of the placenta results in a sudden drop in progesterone/estrogen/HPL levels. This abrupt withdrawal of progesterone in the presence of high prolactin levels cues Lactogenesis II (copious milk production). Other hormones (insulin, thyroxine, cortisol) are also involved, but their roles are not yet well understood. Although biochemical markers indicate that Lactogenesis II commences approximately 30-40 hours after birth, mothers do not typically begin feeling increased breast fullness (the sensation of milk "coming in") until 50-73 hours (2-3 days) after birth.<br><br>
These first two stages of lactation are hormonally driven – they occur whether or not a mother is breastfeeding her baby.<br></td>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I was nursing him like crazy for the first day and the doctors kept telling me he wasn't getting enough and his body temperature kept dropping.</td>
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This is difficult because it doesn't say why they thought he wasn't getting enough. It is possible she was having issues with her latch or the doctor was just misinformed. The first stage of your milk coming in is automatic. Babies are born with a large amount of water weight to carry them through the colostrum period. In the example you read it is hard to say because I don't know if the babies were full term and perhaps weren't prepared for birth? In a normal situation the colostrum comes in when it should and there isn't a reason for supplementation. Even women who formula feed from birth get milk.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mommysusie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8150744"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Because I was reading on another board and someone was saying that they were forced to supplement because the doctor said the baby wasn't getting enough. I remember that happening to me last time.<br>
Basically what happened was my girl twin went directly to the NICU in another hospital after birth. My Twin boy stayed with me. I was nursing him like crazy for the first day and the doctors kept telling me he wasn't getting enough and his body temperature kept dropping. They took him to the nursery for a while and one of the nurses gave him a bottle and he sucked it down like crazy. Well, the doctor thought I wasn't taking care of him and sent him to the NICU also. That really hurt me because I felt like failure even though I was doing all that I could do.<br>
Reading another Mama's story today triggered that memory and got me worried and I just don't want that to happen again this time. Maybe I am just paranoid, but I don't want to starve my baby either.</div>
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My doctor had me supplement with my second because she was jaundice and losing weight. She was born a couple weeks before xmas and it was a majorly busy time. I wish I had ignored my doctor and locked myself in the house to nurse all the time. Supplementing really hurt our breastfeeding relationship and I gave up due to the stress. It would take a lot for me to supplement this time. I'll try every other avenue first.<br><br>
Anyway, I also recommend nursing as much as you can from the beginning.
 

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I'm sorry about your previous experience. Was there a LC there or anything- did they check your latch? Was your DS losing a lot of weight? The best thing for temp regulation is skin to skin contact. I don't know exactly why they thought supplementing would help with that situation, but the sucking reflex is so strong in babies that they will suck whatever goes in their mouth. This can often give the impression of 'hungrily' sucking down a bottle when the action of sucking itself brings in the fluid (whether they are hungry or not) and they will automatically swallow it.<br><br>
I would try to find a certified LC to help you out in the beginning if you are unsure, and check out the kellymom site for tons of info on common misconceptions about nursing, how to identify and correct nursing problems, and a whole lot more. The best thing in the beginning is to offer the breast as much as possible (make sure the latch is good) and stay away from artifical nipples. If the docs are not familiar with natural (BF vs FF) newborns, they often will suggest supplementing when it's not necessary at all. Like with the PP's DD, they will push supplementing with jaundiced babies (which can be *normal*!) even though BM/colostrum offers a better laxative effect, and is what helps resolve most infant jaundice (pushes that meconium out).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No, there was no consultant there. I was in Germany at the time. He had a hard time latching because he was only 4 pounds and I was using a nipple shield to make it easier. I felt like I was doing exactly what I was suppose to do because I had successfully breastfed my older son, so I did have experience.<br>
Thanks for the advice, hopefully I won't get pushed into that next time.
 

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You do what your instinct tells you. You can always say <b>NO</b> to the docs or nurses. My twins were in the NICU for 10days and they wouldn't let me nurse because they were vomiting (which ended up being bad acid reflux). They wanted to test them, hooked them up to IV's-x-rays etc. I started pumping like crazy, even if nothing came out. I finally <b>demanded</b> I nurse them and had the LLC come in to help me through and had some problems with the smaller baby but she eventually got it. I nursed and nursed them and the docs and nurses looked at me like I had three heads. They couldn't believed that in one day they gained 6 oz. But they still continued to say that they kept spitting up and that they could be allergic to my milk (obserd). They also said I could not nurse twins on demand. Needless to say we signed a waiver and took them home and they thrived. I nursed and nursed all day and all night. All the pumping I did in the beginning paid off as well, because I was able to nurse twins with no supplementation at all. So this time contact LLC and let the walk you through it, after all MOM knows best in some situations.
 

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ok this irks me!!<br><br>
peds always say that breastfeeding is best, they incourage it....blah blah blah....but they are the FIRST ONES to push formula onto new moms!<br><br>
the bottom line is they can't calculate and control how much a baby is eating when breastfeeding...so when babies arnt putting on weight quick enought for their liking they make us feel like breastfeeding failures and throw formula at us!<br><br>
grrrrrr
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CrunchyClark</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8149937"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It's totally normal to take even up to 7 days! Most people find it comes in quicker in subsequent pregnancies, because your body knows what it's 'doing'.<br><br>
The best way is just to nurse, nurse, nurse, nurse that baby and offer NO pacfiers or bottles of formula. Baby should be doing all his/her sucking at the breast to stimulate supply! The more stimulation....the sooner milk will come.<br><br>
Once baby arrives, you could pump also if you have a baby who isn't interested much in suckling.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/nod.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="nod"><br><br>
and it is completely normal for babies to loose some weight in the very first few days.
 

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3-4 days is completely normal, and it's also normal for a baby to lose up to 10% of its birth weight in the first few days after delivery. NORMAL! You do NOT need to supplement with up to a 10% weight loss. Just nurse nurse nurse nurse, your milk will come in!
 

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OK, I just have to chime in here and give the medical community a bit of a break. There is a HUGE difference between a baby born at full term with good weight and one that weighs 4 pounds and is not able to maintain his body temperature. Supplementation is a medical condition that is sometime necessary, especially in small or prem babies.<br><br>
so I'd say, take heart, if you're not carrying twins this time, it's likely that you'll go to term, with a good size baby and not have the same problems at all.
 
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