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It's great to hear these kinds of stories. I had the same type of labor, but I was at the hospital. No interventions, though
after my ds was born, my Dr and many nurses told me that they had rarely seen a vaginal delivery in this position, it almost always ends in a C-sec. Thankfully my Dr really believes that women can birth their own babies without a lot of help.
 

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That's awesome. My labor was very long as well (Wed 4:30 pm - Friday 7:40 pm) because my dd kept flipping from front to back during the whole labor. She finally came out with both hands in fists in front of her face.
 

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Wow! What a great story.

Just out of curiosity, how do your clients feel about publicly posting their birth stories? I'm not trying to flame or anything, but in my community there was recently an incidence of a similar situation where a birth story was shared (even though it was always in a positive light and was a GREAT story) and because it was a small community everybody knew who the subject of the story was and the mother became very upset.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My blog has nothing that shows even where I live. I dont' post personal information, or information regarding their personal lives that may indicate who they are. My blog actually is pretty anon, except when I post links to it here.
If I posted my practice name or even my own name, I think there might be some issues - especially since sometimes I break state protocols, etc.
 

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wow anterior face-- this is the hardest to fit though
many years ago now a dear friend had her 4th baby face but she was posterior--
thank you for sharing
I have seen and read your blog before but did not realize it was your blog....
 

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From everything that I have researched on brow presentation, the most "common" presentation that can be born vaginally is anterior brow (a whole whopping 15% of them are able to be born vaginally). The one that is very rare and extremely difficult (not that anterior isn't!!) is the posterior brow. In fact, in researching it, I found that Anne Frye said that most posterior brow babies are either stillborn (softer heads) or extremely premature. In talking with (very briefly) Ina May Gaskin, she sounded very surprised about a posterior brow, and from the sounds of it, hasn't even seen one or possibly had only seen one.

I think it is so awesome that your family was able to have enough courage and support to birth that way!! It is wonderful to hear about it!

Sarah
 

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Yay for her!!!!
When I first started working at a new high risk hospital I came on shift (l&d nurse) to a woman who had been pushing for about 1 1/2 hours. I had a paramedic student with me that day who was very green about childbirth, so I'm sure he didn't even think anything of the situation
. After about another 1/2 hour I could see a bit of the baby, but it didn't look like occiput, so I put on a glove and felt around a bit. Yup, brow (anterior). Did I mention that the patient, her husband, and the pt's mother were all physicians? Well, I stayed very calm while the you know what hit the fan. I called for the senior resident who did nothing. Then I called her GP, who didn't even come. So, finally I called the OB on call, who is very old school. He walked in the room and asked the resident if the baby was mentum anterior or posterior, but since he had not even examined her he did not know. I was trying to talk and he finally listened when I said anterior, anterior. He calmly picked up the scissors and cut a huge episiotomy
. The baby came right out. There was no problem at all and no emergency. In hindsight, I would have just pretended nothing was unusual, since the baby was obviously descending. That much MD in the room was too stressful for me and after it was all over I went to the changeroom and had a good freaking cry over everything. Lesson learned-babies CAN come out in brow presentation!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by pamamidwife
My blog has nothing that shows even where I live. I dont' post personal information, or information regarding their personal lives that may indicate who they are. My blog actually is pretty anon, except when I post links to it here.
If I posted my practice name or even my own name, I think there might be some issues - especially since sometimes I break state protocols, etc.
I can understand. I also have a blog, though I keep it private or with people that I know anonymously but never anyone in my community or my own personal friends. I guess I am particulary sensitive because I am also a midwife and also had one of my previous midwives break confidentiality with my birth story and I was devastated. I was actually attending a LLL meeting after having my first and while I was pregnant with my second when one of the leaders started telling a story about a midwife friend of hers who worked with a woman with a sexual abuse history. I very quickly realized that she was telling MY story! She included many very private details (positive and negative) that I'd shared in private with my midwife and I felt very betrayed, though my name itself was never mentioned. I don't know why she shared my story in the way that she did, but I have my suspicions. It wasn't the stereotypical type of confidentality violation, but I was upset all the same. We live in a fairly small community with an even smaller attachment parenting community and it didn't take me long to realize that my story had been told to all of her friends, who very easily then realized who I was. I immediately fired her during my second pregnancy. It was a difficult but very necessary decision.

Interestingly, another midwife in our community recently had a former client of hers come across her blog and found a picture of her birth! I don't know know the whole story, but I do know that she reported the midwife to our state licensing board because she was upset even though her birth story was very positive and written about in a positive light.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that for many of us involved with midwifery, confidentiality is something that has become very lax because we so often see beautiful birth stories and feel excited and proud to share, but for some women, sharing a positive story (like mine) can be as hurtful as sharing extremely confidential information (also like mine).

Anyway, just something to think about
.
 

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I hope you keep on sharing birth stories. With the way I see you write, nobody has any possible way of knowing who your clients are so I don't think you are breaking any sort of confidentiality issues at all. The brow presentation was something that EVERY mama, doula, midwife, O.B., paramedic...everyone should see.
Thank you for sharing!
 
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