Mothering Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,272 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dd (2nd grade) really wants to be a Brownie. I signed her up and she is super excited. Overall, I love what the Girl Scouts stand for but I am having a real issue with the cookies. I do not like the idea of children being used to sell cookies. I do not like the idea that they encourage cookie competition with the offer of prizes. I do not like that the cookies are not good for you.

How can I explain to my dd why I do not think she should be selling cookies. Or do I just get over myself and let her sell the cookies?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,864 Posts
My girls are in Girls Guides, it's a similar but different group. They sell cookies twice a year. This year we'll have 9 cases to sell twice. They'll start the mint ones right away. Not many people like the mint ones. We usually buy a case, then sell the to 2-3 people we know who like the mint ones. The rest will go back. In the spring when they do the chocolate/vanilla we'll sell all 9 cases easily. I take a case, my mom takes a case even though she lives 6 hours away she complains if I don't buy her a case & bring it the next time we visit.lol

DH takes the girls to work, there's lots of single bachelors.

Here it isn't a contest for who sells the most boxes. Sell 1 box & you get your badge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
My dd is in Brownies. Last year, not all of the the girls participated in the selling of the cookies. My dd did not sell them technically- me and several family members bought a bunch. My dd is a pretty laid back gal and if I told her that we weren't going to do the cookies she'd be cool with it. I don't think the girls that did not participate last year got any flak for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,690 Posts
Dd went to her first meeting, and pretty well the only activity the girls did was practicing selling the cookies. Word was tthat he second meeting they'd all be sent out in small groups to sell door to door with an adult supervisor. She decided not to go back, actually.

I don't remember the emphasis being that heavy when I was a kid. They only had them once a year too, no mint ones.

Maybe the emphasis varies with the particular group? You may want to check.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,683 Posts
You do not have to sell cookies. It is a primary fundraiser (other than dues) for the troop just so you know how they afford certain activities, try-its, trips, etc.

However, you are free to opt out. (I know because I worked for GS) Some leaders will try to say "you have to sell" but they are wrong.

If you are really against it then just talk about fundraising with your daughter in other ways. Explain why they sell cookies though, just so she understands the whole concept.

Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,442 Posts
My oldest dd has been going through the levels of Girls Scouts since Kindergarten -- she started as a Daisy and is now in 6th grade and a Junior Girl Scout. When she began selling as a Brownie we didn't sell very many boxes of cookies -- immediate family like grandmas and a few others. There was not a lot of pressure although there were certainly girls who sold a lot of boxes. As she has gotten older they are encouraged to set goals and ways to reach those goals. In addition to selling to friends and family, the girls take turns in groups at cookie shops with the leaders. Cookie selling has always been optional but the money is used for the entire troop to do activities. As a Brownie the activities are usually less and the cookie thing (at least for us) has been low key. As an older Girl Scout I believe if you choose not to sell you need to supplement some of the money for the activities.

Dd2 is just starting Brownies this year (I was the Daisy leader for her troop last year) and one of my friends is the Leader so I don't think we will encounter any problems but if I were in your situation and felt strongly about not selling cookies I would just see how it goes and if you are not comfortable with her troop leader and her approach look to find another one -- there are some great groups out there.

Also what we have done in the past for other fundraisers such as school is send a donation in lieu of selling the product -- you could consider a small donation towards troop activites.

Good luck with your decision!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
I'm a Brownie Leader, only in my second year, but I really understand your concerns about cookies. We did not require or pressure any of our girls to sell cookies. We did do some cookie booths but it was totally voluntary. All the money goes into the troop account not into accounts for individual girls or anything. Most girls did sell cookies, but some only sold a few and I think 2 didn't sell anything. Some of the girls showed up at ALL the cookie booth times and really seemed to like the selling. We didn't do any of the "goal setting" or other activities that they urge you to do before selling cookies. I suspect that VARIES a lot by troop. I have heard some horror stories about some troops being really pushy about selling a lot. I also have to say that it was amazing to me how much people LOVE those cookies and are really anxious to buy them. If you do want to sell cookies you don't have to do much beyond telling people that you are selling them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
My daughter's a cadet and has been in Scouts since brownies. We usually buy some boxes, so do my parents & bro, and I'll bring the form in to work - most of the women will buy a box or two from each of us with Scouts. Most of the troops cookie sales come from direct sales at a supermarket, bagel shop, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,069 Posts
we just brought our box of cookies home last night. The leader asks if we think we can sell cookies and then asks us how many. Next Saturday is the big go door to door and sell cookies. I think it is a great learning experience for the girls to sell these cookies and handle the money. this is our third year of sparks/ brownies and there hasn't been any pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,864 Posts
Quote:
If you do want to sell cookies you don't have to do much beyond telling people that you are selling them.
Last year I was dropping the kids I babysit off at their mom's work. Their backpacks were in the trunk of the car. When I went to get them out the lady in the car next to me spotted the cookies in the trunk & bought 4 boxes.lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,688 Posts
I'm not sure how much the cookie sales have changed in the last, yikes, more than a quarter of a century! since I sold Girl Scout cookies, but I enjoyed selling cookies as a child. If you sold X amount of cookies you got to go to Girl Scout camp for free or half-price. Although my family could afford camp, it was still a point of pride for me to be able to sell enough cookies to "pay" for camp by myself.

I would think one gentle email to friends and family letting them know that cookies will be available for sale beginning on X date would generate enough sales that you would feel like you had done your part, if you choose to sell the cookies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,813 Posts
Boy, I love those thin mints! But you're right, I would be wary of sending my daughter out so sell cookies. Perhaps you can take them to the office and sell them, and refuse any prizes? That way, the fund raising happens, but the kids don't get used?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
i just wanted to add that depending on where in the USA you are, cookies might be the very first thing the kids do. I know when i was a leader 2 years ago, it was (our start date was the first full week of October - a week before our first meeting!).

This year is the first yr my daughter will NOT be in GS... not because i have issues with GS as a whole - but the only Brownie leader in our area is why DD stopped going mid-year last year (said leader favored her granddaughter, to the extent that her "bullying" my dd and not taking any actions to stop it after my dd reported what happened). I think we're looking to do 4H stuff instead (good - she loves to design and wants to learn to sew - textiles here we come!!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by KJoslyn78 View Post
i just wanted to add that depending on where in the USA you are, cookies might be the very first thing the kids do. I know when i was a leader 2 years ago, it was (our start date was the first full week of October - a week before our first meeting!).

This year is the first yr my daughter will NOT be in GS... not because i have issues with GS as a whole - but the only Brownie leader in our area is why DD stopped going mid-year last year (said leader favored her granddaughter, to the extent that her "bullying" my dd and not taking any actions to stop it after my dd reported what happened). I think we're looking to do 4H stuff instead (good - she loves to design and wants to learn to sew - textiles here we come!!)
She can do Girl Scouts as an "independent" not associated with any troops. My DD's leader last year was AWFUL! Another friend and I tried to start a different troop but only go three kids so we just signed the 3 of them up as independent "Juliettes". We still have meetings, etc. but we don't have a treasury and the adults don't have to be registered leaders.

They can even still sell cookies. Which of course, all of them do. THey really seem to like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,867 Posts
We just joined a troop(dd8),and would sell to grandma only.No door to door or outside a store.We might buy one or 2 as well. I bet in a short time they will start making some organic or wheat free cookies to sell.

Ot but GS related-is it common to be required to pay $$$ per meeting?

We paid the $10 to register and then are required to pay $4 for each meeting,plus take turns supplying food/drink for meetings.Just wondering if that is the norm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,188 Posts
I don't usually support the schools when they send the kids home to sell things to support the school. But with Girl Scouts I've always looked at it differently. Although I don't know why.
I guess I just really love the cookies so I support it.

I think if you don't want her to sell cookies then you should opt out when the time rolls around. I'm sure they wouldn't care. It's not like they would be kicked out based on whether or not they don't sell cookies, or atleast I would hope not. I for one am glad they do sell them though.
: I don't know anyone personally who is a GS so I look forward to getting a few boxes when they are outside the grocery store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
I am a Brownie Leader - I was a daisy leader last year and I preferred that because Daisies don't fund raise.


It's a tough thing to balance as a leader. i HATE HATE HATE fundraisers, and cookies are no different. BUT - I also believe that the girls should have opportunities to try different activities, and most things cost money. So, we either have to ask parents for more money, or we have to fund raise.

Our council does a fall product sale (it's worse than cookies - nuts, candy and magazine subscriptions!) and then cookies come in the winter. Sounds like we do cookies differently too - we take orders from people (instead of getting a crate of cookies and having to sell them all).

As for paying for meetings, most troops require dues of some sort. We meet every other week and charge the $10 registration fee AND $40 dues annually. It's expensive to be a girl Scout - I just bought our troop their pins and 3 try-its they have earned and that came to almost $80 for 13 girls! Nearly 1/8 of our annual budget was spent in the first few weeks on justptches! It's really tough to plan any real programs for the girls because we don't have the money for it.

When I talked to parents about fundraising, I told them that we pretty much have to particiapte as a troop - but that didn't mean every member of the troop has to sell. Some girls really like fundraising and do quite well with it. Others, like my daughter, are lucky if they can talk grandma into buy one thing. But if our troop doesn't participate in council-sponsored sales, we are not allowed to fundraise on our own.

I also told the parents that ourtroop'[s budget was dependant on fundraising to do programs - and we would either need to raise some $$$ as a troop, or assess more dues. They were all okay with that.

Some people are just making a donation to the troop rather than selling a $10 tin of nuts and seeing $.70 go to the troop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Quote:

Originally Posted by mattemma04 View Post
We just joined a troop(dd8),and would sell to grandma only.No door to door or outside a store.We might buy one or 2 as well. I bet in a short time they will start making some organic or wheat free cookies to sell.

Ot but GS related-is it common to be required to pay $$$ per meeting?

We paid the $10 to register and then are required to pay $4 for each meeting,plus take turns supplying food/drink for meetings.Just wondering if that is the norm.
The $10 goes to the the actual GS orginization. it covers things like cost of insurance if a girl or adult member gets hurt while doing GS activities, training, etc... the "dues" are for the actual troop your dd would be a part of. Before i was the leader, the girls paid 50 cents a meeting (we meet every other week)... i did a "flat-rate" due of $20 for the year. Daisies, because they are not allowed to fundraise at all, the only way the troop can have money for supplies, activities, etc is from dues.

It's terribly expensive to be in GS... and although i know my DD could do it independently - she was very much into it to meet other girls... and we have only lived in this year 1 year, so we don't know another other families yet with kids her age (meet loads with kids the same age as my 2 youngest DCs though)... so that is why i think we'll be trying 4-H
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top