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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We had parent teacher conferences today and my dd's teacher went through a checklist of skills that they work on in her Montessori. When she got to language the teacher commented that dd was coming right along with her letter sounds and that they were very happy with her learning.<br><br>
Hold the phone. Progressing with her letter sounds?<br><br>
I told her teacher in a casual tone that dd has been reading me bedtime stories for some time now.<br><br>
DD is busted. I guess she likes the easier works, it gives her more time to socialize. The girl loves to socialize, even the art she brings home is social. "This is me and Ava and Josephina." "This is me and the supermarket cashier eating suckers." "This is me and brother with measuring sticks."<br><br>
So, on my end I am responsible for getting her more social time and the teacher is going to make sure dd is doing work at her level. I tend to be a solitary kind of gal and forget about setting up playdates.<br><br>
For those of you with highly social gifted children, how do you work with your child to achieve a balance between learning and friendships?
 

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<span>Bean is one of the most ridiculously social children I've ever encountered. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I'm not great about playdates, but he spends time with the neighborhood children, his cousins, his Cub Scout den, and his classmates at ADO (Agora Days Out-- it's sort of like a homeschool co-op but it's organized through his cyber charter school). Academic work happens separately, though, except for ADO. While he's there, he works with other students enrolled in the same classes unless they're doing PE or a special project/game (last week's theme was Thanksgiving).<br><br>
As he'll socialize with anyone, having the opportunity to work with older and younger children has been a really wonderful thing for him. The older kids (by and large) set better examples of good behavior, and Bean wants to be accepted so he's better behaved when he's around them. Younger kids appreciate his energy, enthusiasm and knowledge so he comes out of interactions with them feeling really positive about himself and everyone around him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> It's pretty much win-win. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I think he's a lot more balanced than I could ever have hoped for, to be honest. I was very introverted as a child, and so was Mike. Neither of us was capable of socializing comfortably at seven; Bean really puts us to shame. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"></span>
 

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According to our M guides, the 4 year olds are incredibly social creatures in general. They are far more concerned about socializing than learning as a whole.<br><br>
We're looking forward to our little one learning some of those social skills. He wants to be friends with everyone, but doesn't understand that not everyone loves dinosaurs as much as he does, and that reciting the Dinosaur Alphabet song from Dinosaur Train is not usually the best way to make friends. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>spedteacher30</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14698084"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">According to our M guides, the 4 year olds are incredibly social creatures in general. They are far more concerned about socializing than learning as a whole.<br><br>
We're looking forward to our little one learning some of those social skills. He wants to be friends with everyone, but doesn't understand that not everyone loves dinosaurs as much as he does, and that reciting the Dinosaur Alphabet song from Dinosaur Train is not usually the best way to make friends. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"></div>
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My dd would totally love his way of making friends. She LOVES Dinosaur Train! And, I kinda like the intro song. But, don't tell anyone I walk around doing housework singing it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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Oh, that was so me when I was in school. I was put in the lowest group in reading in grade 1, even though I could already read chapter books. I loved whipping through the phonics worksheets and then had lots of time to distract everyone else . . . until the teacher complained that I was wandering around talking too much and my mom told her I could already read. I was generally happy to do more advanced work if it was given to me, but if it wasn't, I didn't really care.<br><br>
If I was with a good group of kids, I found school really fun. I spent a lot of time socializing, or reading or making puppets out of pieces of carpet . . . it wasn't so much a problem for me as it was for the teachers (not to mention some of my friends who weren't keeping up), since I was always done my work.<br><br>
I think probably just letting the teacher know where she's at, so the teacher will know how to challenge her might be enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks! It is good to hear these stories! I think we're on the right track with trying to set up more out of school playdates and having the teacher know what dd is capable of. I'm eager to see what dd's school experience is going to be over the next few weeks. Hopefully she'll be able to tell me new things she is learning, she's been coming home saying that they don't really teach her anything. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> Silly me thought that she was just being a kid and not really connecting the lessons they give with actual learning.
 
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