Mothering Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have started making butter at home from organic cream and using the jar shaking method. I do not think I got all the buttermilk out of it last time.<br><br>
For those mothers who make their own butter, about how long does it take you to knead the buttermilk out of your butter? What temperature does your kitchen sit at when you are doing this?<br><br>
Thanks for the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,777 Posts
I'm not sure -- probably not more than 10 mins of folding/mixing/kneading and changing water.<br><br>
Kitchen temp varies -- we don't have ac in the summer. I have heard that ice cubes help, though I don't know if that means ice cubes in the butter while you knead, or sitting your bowl in an ice bath.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,216 Posts
I find that a cooler kitchen makes better butter. It's easier to work the butter, gives it a better texture. If the kitchen is warm, I put the butter in the fridge for awhile before I work it (after I wash the butter in cold water).<br><br>
It takes me 10-15 min. to work the butter (folding, pressing, etc.). However, no matter how much you work the butter, you will never get all the buttermilk out of it. The only way to do that is to heat it and separate the milk solids. At that point, you have ghee, which is free of milk solids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,061 Posts
Can someone explain how you make butter? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The simple directions are:<br><br>
Take heavy cream ( I use organic whipping cream) and leave it on the counter from a few hours to 24 hours. This will let it sour and culture a little bit which makes better tasting butter.<br><br>
Fill a canning type jar about 1/3 of the way full and shake. This is actually the churning process. It can take 10 minutes to 30 minutes depending on your cream. It will lump into a light colored mass. Keep shaking until it is butter colored. Pour off the buttermilk that is left in the jar and put the butter in a bowl or on a cold stone.<br><br>
Wash with ice water and knead it through the butter with a spoon, a potato masher, or your hands. Keep pouring and rinsing until the water runs clear.<br><br>
Add a pinch of salt or to taste. That is butter.<br><br>
My husband really likes this and we have both become very sensitive to non-organic dairy as well as just wanting to do more ourselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,261 Posts
How much butter milk are you left with?<br><br>
How much butter does that make?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It is supposed to make about half the quantity of the cream you use, but I actually found that it made more then that. But I do not think we churned it enough. I had "help." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
That is what you get for having a Wolf and a Cat help you <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,777 Posts
The buttermilk is great in recipes -- makes wonderful pancakes <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yummy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yummy">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,255 Posts
It only takes me a few min. to wash the butter. I put it in a big glass measuring cup and run it under cold water, then I squish and pour the water out and repeat.<br><br>
If you want a thick store like buttermilk then try culturing the cream first. Take your heavy cream and add a few tbsp of good buttermilk. Let sit out until nice and thick. It usually takes two day for me but my house is cooler. Then put it in the fridge overnight. When you want to make the cultured butter then whip it up, but be sure to keep some of the cultured cream (cream fraiche) it's delish. Then you will have a thick cultured buttermilk when the butter is made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
dds like to make butter. I put on some loud music and let them jump and dance on the bed with baby food jars of cream. It is quite a treat LOL!<br>
The first time we did it my youngest dd was pretty young so she made her butter in one of my plastic breastmilk bottles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
I've always made it in the blender, turned on low. It usually takes about 10-12ish minutes before it seizes up and separates into definite "buttermilk" and butter itself.<br><br>
I'll rinse it a few times and spin it for a few seconds - rinse then spin.<br><br>
I usually use the "buttermilk" for the dogs' food, since we don't drink it.<br><br>
It always turns out SO good! Anyone ever mix it up a bit? We've made garlic butter and honey butter, but I'd like to try a herb-type butter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
We just bought a ton of butter in bulk, but after that's gone I am SO making fresh butter! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top