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I'm not sure if this was the right place to put this. If not I apalogise!<br><br>
I read a study several months ago about the increased complications (including death of mother and later still birth increases) in c sections compared with vaginal birth's, but it wasn't online and I don't have the source. Someone I know is deciding to have a c section or a vaginal delivery, and I'm saying to at least try the vaginal first, and another person is saying that vaginal is just as risky as c sections with the same complications.<br><br>
Can someone provide me with some links to share with them about c section vs vaginal birth complications and risks? I would totally appreciate it. Thanks so much!
 

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Here's a link to the NY Times report on the study showing the increase in infant mortality...<br><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/05/health/05birt.html?ex=1178164800&en=4b9981a2a1cd94da&ei=5070" target="_blank">http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/05/he...cd94da&ei=5070</a><br><br>
There's also one showing a triple increase in materal mortality, but CNN took my link down so I don't know where to find it ATM. Maybe someone else will have it.
 

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I did a quick search on maternal mortality and found <a href="http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/544101" target="_blank">this</a>.
 

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<a href="http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art36018.asp" target="_blank">http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art36018.asp</a><br><br><a href="http://www.motherfriendly.org/Downloads/csec-fact-sheet.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.motherfriendly.org/Downlo...fact-sheet.pdf</a>
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Infant outcomes worse with planned C-section<br>
: 6:56 p.m. EST, January 9, 2007<br>
EW YORK (Reuters) -- Newborns who are delivered via planned Caesarean section are more likely to be transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit and to experience lung disorders compared with those delivered via planned vaginal delivery, according to findings published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.<br>
"The appropriateness of the rising rate of Caesarean delivery worldwide has been debated widely," Dr. Toril Kolas, of Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway, and colleagues write.<br>
The researchers examined the outcome of deliveries during a six-month period, along with data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway on intended mode of delivery.<br>
Of the 18,653 deliveries, 17,828 were planned vaginal deliveries and 825 were planned Caesarean deliveries.<br>
Rates of transfer to the neonatal intensive care unit were 5.2 percent for planned vaginal deliveries, significantly lower than the 9.8 percent for planned Caesarean deliveries. Lung disorders were also significantly lower in the planned vaginal delivery group (0.8 percent) than in the Caesarean delivery group (1.6 percent).<br>
No significant differences were observed in the risks of low Apgar score or neurological symptoms.<br>
"For the child, the stress of vaginal delivery seems superior to elective Caesarean delivery in many situations," Kolas and colleagues conclude. "Therefore, we emphasize the importance of limiting planned Caesarean deliveries to cases with proven benefit for the mother and/or child," they write. "When a planned Caesarean delivery is chosen, the operation should be as close to term as possible."<br>
Copyright 2007 Reuters. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.<br><br><a href="http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/01/09/c.section.reut/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/01/09...eut/index.html</a></td>
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here is the posted stroy that was the CNN link.<br><br>
The link is at the bottom, but no longer active.<br><br>
I had it saved<br><br>
they may be the same study -- i am not sure<br><br>
A
 

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With a c/s, the baby doesn't get the fluid squeezed out of his lungs. Also, some of the hormonal things in the mother may not get properly triggered.
 

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<a href="http://www.childbirthconnection.org" target="_blank">www.childbirthconnection.org</a> is a great website for information in comparing c/s to vaginal birth (and may not even include the most recent studies)<br><a href="http://www.ican-online.org" target="_blank">www.ican-online.org</a> also has great information.<br><br>
A c/s is riskier for both mother and baby. I think the latest research says that a baby is three times more likely to die in the first month of life after a c-section. Also, having a c/s puts your future children at risk (increase in secondary infertility, increase in miscarriage, increase in still birth, increase in risk of having a hysterectomy as well in future pregnancies).<br><br>
I hope this person gets all their facts straight before making their choice.
 

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A c/s baby is much more likely to have extra fluid in his lungs because he wasnt squeezed through the birth canal. DS ended up in the NICU for 4 days for that and DD almost had to go. Tell your friend to imagine her hospital stay with no baby in her arms.
 

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There are some great articles on Mothering.com. Go to Pregnancy & Birth and then click on ceasaerian and VBAC.
 

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OP: Is this her first baby? Is she planning on having any more? One thing that absolutely must be considered is that a successful vaginal birth has no repercussions in subsequent pregnancies, while even a successful c-section does. Even the OBs admit that much.
 

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Henci Goer wrote <a href="http://www.lamaze.org/institute/advancing/docs/elective_cesarean_consequences.pdf" target="_blank">this article</a> for Lamaze about the risks of cesarean versus vaginal birth. It presents the outcomes of two hypothetical populations of women having either planned cesarean sections or planned vaginal births. I hope that helps!<br><br>
-Amy
 

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Another thing to consider is that many of the difficulties experienced after a c/s don't even count as a complication even though they affect women's bodies and lives, sometimes permanently. So studies, IMO, cannot accurately reflect the frequency of complications unless they admit the existence of problems like numbness that lasts months/years, pain experienced from adhesions even years later, negative impact on women's sex lives from a variety of c/s side effects... those things and more are never counted when "complications" are added up. I have had a recovery take many months of pain, and it was two years before I felt physically back to normal, yet nothing I was experiencing would have been considered a 'complication" the way it is currently defined. On paper my surgery and recovery are "successful". In real life, it was horrible and I know there are many women who have had it far worse.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>velcromom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8010116"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Another thing to consider is that many of the difficulties experienced after a c/s don't even count as a complication even though they affect women's bodies and lives, sometimes permanently. So studies, IMO, cannot accurately reflect the frequency of complications unless they admit the existence of problems like numbness that lasts months/years, pain experienced from adhesions even years later, negative impact on women's sex lives from a variety of c/s side effects... those things and more are never counted when "complications" are added up. I have had a recovery take many months of pain, and it was two years before I felt physically back to normal, yet nothing I was experiencing would have been considered a 'complication" the way it is currently defined. On paper my surgery and recovery are "successful". In real life, it was horrible and I know there are many women who have had it far worse.</div>
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Seriously, once upon a time the cesarean itself was considered a complication (not to mention all the stuff you talk about like post-op pain, etc)! These days some people talk about it like its just another way to give birth.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>velcromom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8010116"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Another thing to consider is that many of the difficulties experienced after a c/s don't even count as a complication even though they affect women's bodies and lives, sometimes permanently. So studies, IMO, cannot accurately reflect the frequency of complications unless they admit the existence of problems like numbness that lasts months/years, pain experienced from adhesions even years later, negative impact on women's sex lives from a variety of c/s side effects... those things and more are never counted when "complications" are added up.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:<br>
My third section was in July, 2005. I still can't feel my bladder until it's ready to burst, and a very large portion of my abdomen is still numb. Nothing like that happened with my first two, but...three strikes, yk? I also had a minor infection that probably wouldn't be counted as a complication, because it didn't require re-hospitalization. It was still a major PITA and caused me a lot of grief.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you all soooo much for all the links and help. I'll be sure to save those links and show it to her.<br><br>
And yes, it is her first baby. I think the dr. is just one of those that prefers to do c sections. I hope this info can help convince her to at least try a vaginal birth first! Thanks!
 

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I had a c-section and am glad that I did because it was the best option for the health of my baby, BUT it's been very difficult for me. I have a staph infection from the incision and was hospitalized for 48 hours to have the incision reopened and receive IV antibiotics. Now, 2 weeks later, I still have daily visits from a home nurse who packs the incision site to drain the fluid from the wound. I have no idea when this will end... the doctor and the nurse have very different opinions about how the wound is healing and what needs to happen next.<br><br>
My husband was researching what happened to me and found an article that said the infection rate in c-sections is 15-25% depending on the hospital. Yes, a lot of those infections are topical and require little more than oral antibiotics, but some are like mine and require hospitalization followed by lengthy home care.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>grniys</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7999536"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">... another person is saying that vaginal is just as risky as c sections with the same complications.</div>
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Ask that person for proof of this nonsense.<br><br>
Actually, the way the medical profession handles and views "natural birth" in the hospital, this may be true.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MommytoTwo</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8002744"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">A c/s baby is much more likely to have extra fluid in his lungs because he wasnt squeezed through the birth canal. DS ended up in the NICU for 4 days for that and DD almost had to go. Tell your friend to imagine her hospital stay with no baby in her arms.</div>
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Yes!<br><br>
Also in most hospitals it is routine to take csection babies immediately to the nursery, even if they are perfectly healthy, just as a matter of routine. I saw my son and he was held up to me briefly, then whisked away. I did not get to hold him. My arms were strapped to the surgery table and no one really cared about what I wanted anyway. The separation, even though "just a couple of hours" was completely unneccessary and caused so much emotional trauma.<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>velcromom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8010116"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Another thing to consider is that many of the difficulties experienced after a c/s don't even count as a complication even though they affect women's bodies and lives, sometimes permanently.<br><br>
On paper my surgery and recovery are "successful". In real life, it was horrible and I know there are many women who have had it far worse.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">: For every woman that had a "successful" csection, I am sure there are many, many, MANY more that did not, regardless of what any study says.
 

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I know anecdotal evidence is not necessarily helpful here, but my cousin had her elective c/s go terribly wrong. A bit of placenta was left inside and she ended up in the hospital for weeks--without her newborn--to fight the infection. When comparing that nightmare to my amazing homebirth a few months earlier, even my dad declared homebirths (and therefore natural vaginal births) must be safer! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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You had a baby at home? Why, you could have died!<br><br>
I am kidding...<br><br>
Congratulations! Well begun is half done! What a beautiful beginning!<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Also in most hospitals it is routine to take csection babies immediately to the nursery, even if they are perfectly healthy, just as a matter of routine.</td>
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How sad! A healthy baby is a healthy baby no matter how they came into this world. The fact that this remains a routine after caesarean surgery is testament to the fact that the hospitals know there is a difference between vaginally and surgically delivered babies (another thread) and that is why they continue to treat them differently.
 
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